French Gastronomy on Stamps (10): Corse/Corsica

timbres-gastronomie-corse

France has issued many stamps on food (not foodstamps!) on her own gastronomy for quite some time.
A new series will be issued on April 25th and wil be printed in the form of mini-sheets dedicated to a particular region with stamps, pics and explanations.
With the tenth of these sheets I’d like to introduce is Corse.
Corse or Corsica has a long has long, rich and extremely agitated history. Even now, it “refuses” to go along any centralized authority.
It had been a haven for Moorish pirates before being possessed by various families and states from Italy. It was subsequently sold to France in the 18th Century with the remarkable consequence that its most famous/notorious son, Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte became French for the sorrow of many a family or country almost all over Europe.
Corsicans have always been resilient and self-sufficient.
On this sheet you will discover:
-Chestnuts, the bread of Corsica as islanders have always eaten more bread made from chestnut flour than wheat flour.
-Pork: sausages, of all kinds, have been a food staple.
-Donkeys who found their way onto plates in the form of succulent salamis!
-Brocchu Cheese (Goat milk), a superlative cheese served fresh or matured to various degrees.

Corse also has many a wine worth the voyage whileit seas are renown for its lobsters and Mediterranean fish!
Do you know that a railway crosses the whole island, giving access to some unforgettable views and hidden old towns?

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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