Japanese Cakes/Wagashi 7: Creation 2/Sakura Mochi

WAGASHI-SAKURA-MOCHI-2

Sakura Mochi (桜餅) is a variety of wagashi, or Japanese confectionery consisting of a sweet pink mochi (rice cake) and red bean paste, covered with a leaf of sakura (cherry blossom).

Sakura Mochi (桜餅) or Cherry Blossom Mochi has been popular all over Japan since the beginning of gastronomy in the Land of the Rising Sun.
The style of Sakura Mochi differs from the regions in Japan.
Basically, the east of Japan such as Tokyo uses shiratama-ko (白玉粉/ rice flour) and the west side such as Kansai uses dōmyōji-ko (道明寺粉/glutinous rice flour) for “batter”.

WAGASHI-SAKURA-MOCHI
Anko is folded inside a mochi sheet and again inside an edible cherry tree leaf.

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Here the anko is inside white mochi, then folded in cherry tree leaf and topped with an edible cherry flower.

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A smaller, very cute Sakura Mochi: the coloure mochi contains anko and is presented inside an edible cherry tree leaf.

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Sakura mochi as sold over the counter in the Kansai/West Japan Region.
They are also called Sakura Dango/Cherry Balls (no comment, please!LOL)

SIMPLE RECIPE
This recipe is for making Western-style sakuramochi. Serves 8.

INGREDIENTS:
3/4 cup glutinous rice flour
1/3 cup sugar
1 cup water
3/4 cup red bean paste
red food coloring (optional)
8 sakura leaves pickled in salted water

PREPARATION:
Wash pickled sakura leaves and dry.
Boil water in a pan.
Mix glutinous flour in the water.
Cover the pan with a lid and leave it for 5 minutes.
Place a wet cloth in a steamer and put the dough on the cloth.
Steam the dough for about 20 minutes over medium heat.
Remove the steamed dough to a bowl.
Mash the dough slightly with a wooden pestle, mixing sugar into the dough.
Dissolve a little bit of red food color in some water.
Add some of the red water in the dough and mix well.
Divide the pink mochi into 8 balls.
Flat each mochi ball by hands and place red bean paste filling on the dough.
Wrap the filling with mochi and rounds by hands.
Wrap each mochi with a sakura leaf.

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3 thoughts on “Japanese Cakes/Wagashi 7: Creation 2/Sakura Mochi”

  1. Hi Robert,
    thanks so much for the fast response.
    I love japanese food and am dying to get full use out of the sakuras around melbourne, Australia.

    A little hesititant to use the sakura, but love it so much.

    thanks again.

    are you just a passionate foodist like myself? love the website.. love food.. drool!

    Like

  2. Hi,
    I’ve got a question regarding baking or using sakura leaves.

    Can you just pick them off a tree and use them in baking or will i die from them? haha!
    i love sakura, but am wanting to know how to use them… fresh!

    thanks,
    Michelle

    Like

    1. Dear Michelle!
      Greetings!
      You must pick up the leaves when they are young.
      The Japanese preserve them in salted water or sweet vinegar.
      You can pick from clean trees. Clean them first and dry them between sheets of kitchen paper.
      Flowers are also edible. The Japanese pickle them in salt.
      Cheers,
      Robert-Gilles

      Like

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