Sushi Donburi

Sushi Donburi for Friday the 13th!

donburi-09-02-13

Yesterday I made the mistake to notify the Missus too early that I was not going out tonight as per my usual schedule.
-“Fine,” she replied, “and I expect you to cook as well!”
-“No problem!”
-“I’d better prepare a light lunch, then!”
-“….”

So as part of a “budget lunch” including salad and miso soup (and strawberries for dessert) she prepared the above donburi:
-The rice was steamed rice to which she mixed the konbu/seaweed finely cut.
-She marinated thin slices of raw tuna in ponzu, sake and what else. The leftover marinade was poured over the rice to season it before she placed the pieces of tuna on top.
-Smoked salmon with capers.
-A spoon of “tobikko/flying fish roe”
-a generous portion of locally-made (up the Abe River in Shizuoka City) “Wasabi zuke/chopped wasabi stems and flowers fermented in “sake kasu/sake white lees” (all from Shizuoka Prefecture!)

Friday the 13th it is today. Let’s hope it is my (our) lucky day!
————————
donburi-sapporo-1
From bottom, clockwise:
“Uni” (Sea Urchin), “Kani Tsume” (Crab legs), “Maguro” (Tuna), “Nanban Ebi” ( large prawn variety)

“Donburi” is a popular way to eat sushi with foreigners as it combines quality and quantity, and usually reasonable prices!
I thought a few examples might help you choose your favourites nex time you come to Japan!
The above donburi and three following were savoured in Sapporo and Otaru (Hokkaido Island).

donburi-sapporo-2
From bottom, clockwise:
A little variation from the first pic!

“Hotate” (Scallops), “Uni” (Sea urchin), “Ika” (Squid), “Kani Tsume” (Crab legs)

donburi-sapporo-3
A more extravagant sample this time:

From top middle clockwise:
“Ikura” (salmon roe), “Kazu no ko” (herring roe), “Kampachi” (Amberjack), “Tako” (octopus), “Sake” (raw salmon), “Hotate” (scallops), in the centre, “Uni” (sea urchin)

donburi-sapporo-4
This is a truly extravagant one!

From bottom, clockwise:
“Hotate” (Scallops), “Ikura” (Salmon roe), “Kazu no Ko” (Herring roe), “Kampachi” (Amberjack), “Uni” ( Sea Urchin), “Kani Tsume” (Crab leg), “Ebi” (Boiled prawn)

———————–
During a recent trip in Shiretoko, Hokkaido Island, we dropped at Ikyuya Restaurant, located in a small city called Shari (some of the place names in Hokkaido can become a real puzzle as they are mostly very local names written in Kanji that fit the pronunciation instead of the meaning!).
We (the Missus) had chosen this establishment as a representative of the local cuisine favoured by local people.

donburi-hokkaido-1

THe Missus oredered the “Oyako Don”/”Father-Mother and Son-Daughter Bowl”.
In Shizuoka it means chicken omelette (the Hen and the Egg!) spread on a bowl of rice. In Hokkaido, it stands for Shake sahimi”/salmon sashimi and “Ikura”/salmon roe spread over a bowl of rice. It must have been good as for once silence reigns around the table!

donburi-hokkaido-2

Our two friends (which included our gracious driver) opted for “Uni don”/sea urchin and chopped dry nori/seaweed spread over a bowl of rice,

donburi-hokkaido-3

“Uni to Ikura Don”/sea urchin and salmon roe spread over a bowl of rice.
Extravagance at a very reasonable rice, absolutely fresh and sweet seafood away from metropolises, what more can you ask?
Ikyuya
Hokkaido, Shari Cho, Utoro Higashi, 13 (2 minutes walk from Utoro Hotsprings Bus Terminal)
Tel.: 0152-242557
Opening hours: 11:00~18:00 (might get closed in the afternoon on busy days. Come early!)
———————–
Home-made Donburi

donburi-home

You do not have to go to a Japanese restaurant or sushi bar to eat “donburi” if you happen to have a wife who not only likes them but can also concoct them!
In short, my better (worse?) half once came up with the following for lunch:

Plain steamed rice topped with slices of “akami”/ lean tuna part, avocado salad with mayonnaise and wasabi pickles (the latter provided a nice balance with a spicy touch), boiled sirasu/whitebait sprinkled with “hijiki” seaweed and “tobikko”/flying fish roe.
The tobikko added a nice colour finish touh. It is quite cheap down here in Shizuoka City. From what I saw on Chuckeats Blog, it seems quite a treat over there in the U.S.!
I poured a little Shizuoka-made wasabi dressing on top. This dressing is a lot milder than pure grated wasabi with a little sweetness which combines well with the fish!

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