Tag Archives: 茸

French Cuisine: Cream Sauce Mushrooms

cream-mushrooms.gif

The mushrooms season has already started, wild ones or cultivated species. Morels for example can be found in woods in many countries of the northern Hemisphere. Mushrooms are low in calories, but high in quality, whether it concerns taste or nutrients.
But you do not have to wait till the season to appreciate them.
Deep-frozen mixed mushrooms packs are available on the internet and good supermarkets.
Here is the recipe of a dish my father enjoys ooking regularly back home in France. It can accompany any meat, especially white-flesh meat, or can be appreciated on its own as accompaniment with a solid white wine or heady Japanese sake.

INGREDIENTS: For3~4 people
-Mixed mushrooms of your choice, fresh or frozen (if frozen, let them thaw slowly inside refrigerator for a few hours and get rid of excess water): 500g
-Shallots (echalottes): 2 finely chopped
-Garlic: 2~3 cloves finely chopped (crush garlic before chopping it. Do not forget to discard cores!)
-Parsley or Italian flat parsley: half a cup finely chopped
-Fresh cream: 1 cup/200cc/ml
-Madeira wine: 1/4 cup/50cc/ml (yellow port is fine, too, as well as sweet sherry)
-Olive oil (EVA) and unsalted butter: about 2 large spoons of each
-Salt, pepper, nutmeg (to taste)

RECIPE:

-On a medium fire in large frypan melt an equal quantity of olive oil and unsalted butter (some people prefer more, some less. Experiment!). Throw in the shallots and garlic and slowly fry until shallots turn transparent. Throw in all the mushrooms and fry until they give back enough water. Add Madeira wine. Stir well. Next add fresh cream and stir until cream is perfectly blended. Add salt, peeper and nutmeg last, stir. Check taste and add more spices if needed.
-Pour the whole in a large dish and sprinkle parsley over the mushrooms before serving.
-Eat hot.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Ideal Party

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Vegetables Facts & Tips 9/1: Shiitake Mushrooms (Amended & expanded)

mushrooms-market
(Mushrooms at at a Shizuoka Supermarket)

I don’t intend to talk about wild mushrooms here as I would need a very thick book to post!
Japan is arguably the country cultivating the greatest number of varieties (new ones appear and disappear every year!), so I will limit myself to give information on at least some of them and furthermore introduce most varieties I have found in Japanese supermarkets (most of them should be available in many countries).

SHIITAKE

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FACTS:
Shiitake/Lentinula Edodes (Black Forest Mushrooms) are native to China but have been grown in both Japan and China since prehistoric times[2]. They have been cultivated for over 1000 years; the first written record of shiitake cultivation can be traced to Wu Sang Kwuang, born during the Song Dynasty (AD 960–1127). However, some documents record the uncultivated mushroom being eaten as early as AD 199.
Fresh and dried shiitake have many uses in the cuisines of East Asia. In Chinese cuisine, they are often sauteed in vegetarian dishes such as Buddha’s delight. In Japan, they are served in miso soup, used as the basis for a kind of vegetarian dashi, and also as an ingredient in many steamed and simmered dishes. In Korean cuisine, they are commonly used in dishes such as bulgogi (marinated grilled beef), jjigae (stews), and namul (sauteed vegetable dishes). In Thailand, they may be served either fried or steamed.

Shiitake are often dried and sold as preserved food in packages. These must be rehydrated by soaking in water before using. Many people prefer dried shiitake to fresh, considering that the sun-drying process draws out the umami flavour from the dried mushrooms by breaking down proteins into amino acids and transforms ergosterol to vitamin D. The stems of shiitake are rarely used in Japanese and other cuisines, primarily because the stems are harder and take longer to cook than the soft fleshy caps. The highest grade of shiitake are called donko in Japanese.
Extracts from shiitake mushrooms (such as ichtyol) have also been researched for many other immunological benefits, ranging from anti-viral properties to possible treatments for severe allergies, as well as arthritis.
The Japanese actually consume them from their raw form more than in any other country.

FACTS:

-Season: best in October~March for outdoors cultivation

-Main beneficial ingredients: Vitamin B1, B2, B6, c, N6, Ergosterol, Lentinan, Fibers, Potassium, Magensium, Phosphorus.

TIPS:

-Loosely wrap them in clean Newspaper or Kitchen Paper and store them in fridge away from the light.

-Choose specimens with unbroken “umbrella” and no black marks under.

-Fresh Shiitake are best enjoyed for their taste by keeping their cooking simple such as fry them over a grill with a dash of soy sauce and sake!

-If you want to dry them, do so under sunlight for best taste!

-Preserve dried shiitake in fridge to avoid mold and insects!

HEALTH FACTS:

-Dried shiitake contain more Vitamnin D!

-Combined with burdock root, or broccoli, or carrot, or asparaguses, helps combat cancer and helps with skin rejuvenation.

-Combined with konbu/seaweed, or spinach, or sardines, or sesame, helps combat bone diseases, activates blood circulation, helps combat nervous problems and rheumatism.

-Combined with sesame, or walnuts, or kabocha, or mayonnaise, helps combat ageing.

-Combined with celery, or cuttle fish/squid, or octopus, or mackerel, helps reinforce liver, combats high blood pressure, heart diseases and artery hardening.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Social Culinaire, Sushi Nomads, Cook, Eat & Share, Gourmet Fury, 5 Star Foodie

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Vegetables Facts and Tips (9/2): Japanese Cultivated Mushrooms

mushrooms-market

Mushrooms at Supermarket in Shizuoka City

This the second part concerning edible mushrooms in general.
Instead of going through one by one, which might turn into a boring chore, let me show what is available in Japan!

I don’t intend to talk about wild mushrooms here as I would need a very thick book to post!

Japan is arguably the country cultivating the greatest number of varieties (new ones appear and disappear every year!), so I will limit myself to give information on the varieties I have found so far in Japanese supermarkets (most of them should be available in many countries.
Note that the names are in Japanese as most are marketed this way abroad.

ERINGE or ERINGI
mushrooms-eringe-2

Very interesting mushrooms as they keep firm and lose only some of their volumes. Vegetarians can prepare them suteed like scallops!

mushrooms-eringe-1
As sold in the supermarkets

TAMOGITAKE
tamogitake1
As found in the nature

efbd94efbd81efbd8defbd8fefbd87efbd89efbd94efbd81efbd8befbd85efbc92
As human-grown.

tamogitake3
As sold in the supermarkets
Very elegant small mushroom

KIKURAGE

kikurage
Called Judas Ear, as sold in the supermarkets.

BUNAPII

mushrooms-hara
As found in the supermarkets. A rcent variety!

BROWN MUSHROOM

mushrooms-brown
Brown Mushrooms are called so in Japan. Ther are a variety of Agaricus originall imported from Canada.
As found in the supermarkets.

TAMPA SHIMEJI

mushrooms-tampa
A variety of Shimeji.
As foundin the Supermarkets.

HON-SHIMEJI

mushrooms-honshimeji
“True” Shimeji as found in the supermarkets.

PORTOBELLA MUSHROOM

portobella-mushroom
A universally loved mushroom.
As found in the supermarkets.

mushrooms-portobella-sugimoto-3
Before being cooked!

mushrooms-portobella-sugimoto-21
As prepared by Tetsuya Sugimoto!

NAMEKO

nameko1
As found in nature.

nameko2pholiota_nameko
As sold in the supermarkets.

efbd8eefbd81efbd8defbd85efbd8befbd8fefbc91
Grown in earthenware bottles.

BUNA-SHIMEJI

bunashimeji-hypsizygus_marmoreus
As found in nature.

bunashimejihypsizygus_tessellatus03
Human-grown ans as sold in the supermarkets.

ENOKITAKE

efbd85efbd8eefbd8fefbd8befbd89efbd94efbd81efbd8befbd85-flammulina_velutipes
As found in nature.

efbd85efbd8eefbd8fefbd8befbd89efbd94efbd81efbd8befbd85efbc91
As fully human-grown.

enokitakejapanesemushroom
As very youn human-grown and usually sold in the supermarkets. Very popular in soups, nabe and sukiyaki.

HIRATAKE

hiratake2
Also called Oyster Mushrooms as found in nature.

hiratake1
Human-grown.

MUKITAKE

mukitake
As found in nature.

Will keep looking for more!

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Vegetables Facts and Tips (9/1): Mushrooms/Shitake

mushrooms-market
(Mushrooms at at a Shizuoka Supermarket)

I don’t intend to talk about wild mushrooms here as I would need a very thick book to post!
Japan is arguably the country cultivating the greatest number of varieties ( new ones appear and disappear every year!), so I will limit myself to give information on at least four of them and furthermore introduce most varieties I have found in Japanese supermarkets (most of them should be available in many countries.

SHIITAKE

efbd93efbd88efbd89efbd89efbd94efbd81efbd8befbd85

FACTS:
Shiitake/Lentinula Edodes (Black Forest Mushrooms) are native to China but have been grown in both Japan and China since prehistoric times[2]. They have been cultivated for over 1000 years; the first written record of shiitake cultivation can be traced to Wu Sang Kwuang, born during the Song Dynasty (AD 960–1127). However, some documents record the uncultivated mushroom being eaten as early as AD 199.
Fresh and dried shiitake have many uses in the cuisines of East Asia. In Chinese cuisine, they are often sauteed in vegetarian dishes such as Buddha’s delight. In Japan, they are served in miso soup, used as the basis for a kind of vegetarian dashi, and also as an ingredient in many steamed and simmered dishes. In Korean cuisine, they are commonly used in dishes such as bulgogi (marinated grilled beef), jjigae (stews), and namul (sauteed vegetable dishes). In Thailand, they may be served either fried or steamed.

Shiitake are often dried and sold as preserved food in packages. These must be rehydrated by soaking in water before using. Many people prefer dried shiitake to fresh, considering that the sun-drying process draws out the umami flavour from the dried mushrooms by breaking down proteins into amino acids and transforms ergosterol to vitamin D. The stems of shiitake are rarely used in Japanese and other cuisines, primarily because the stems are harder and take longer to cook than the soft fleshy caps. The highest grade of shiitake are called donko in Japanese.
Extracts from shiitake mushrooms (such as ichtyol) have also been researched for many other immunological benefits, ranging from anti-viral properties to possible treatments for severe allergies, as well as arthritis.
The Japanese actually consume them from their raw form more than in any other country.

-Season: best in October~March for outdoors cultivation
-Main beneficial ingredients: Vitamin B1, B2, N6, Ergosterol, Lentinan, Fibers.

TIPS:

-Loosely wrap them in clean Newspaper or Kitchen Paper and store them in fridge away from the light.
-Choose specimens with unbroken “umbrella” and no black marks under.
-Fresh Shiitake are best enjoyed for their taste by keeping their cooking simple such as frying them over a grill with a dash of soy sauce and sake!

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

—————————————-
日本語のブログ
—————————————-