Vegan Japanese Cuisine: New Cabbage In Sweet Vinegar Marinade

New cabbages are coming to the markets in Shizuoka!
They are both juicy and crunchy and are just great raw!

Here is a simple recipe for vegans to enjoy:

New Cabbage in Sweet Vinegar Marinade!

INGREDIENTS:

-New Cabbage: 4~5 leaves
-Graound sesame seeds: 2 tablespoons
-Sugar: 1 tablespoon
-Rice vinegar: 1+1/2 tablespoons
-Light taste soy sauce: 1/2 tablespoon

RECIPE:

-Cut the cabbage leaves in 4 cm square pieces.

-Heat salted water in a pan to boiling point.

-Throw in the cabbage.

-Take cabbage out just before boiling point and set aside.

-In a large bowl, mix ll ingredients with cabbage while they are still hot.

-Let it cool down completely.

It can actually be savoured warm, lukearm or chilled, although the quicker you eat it, the better!

Add some leafy greens or sprouts for decoration!

Simple again, ain’t it? (I tend to repeat myself! LOL)

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless Mama, Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice, The French Market Maven

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

—————————————-
日本語のブログ
—————————————-

Bryan Baird’s Newsletter (2010/02/01)

Baird Beer & Taproom Events Bulletin
bryan-sayuri.gif

Dear Taproom Friend & Baird Beer Enthusiast:

Official Opening: Baird Beer Online E-Shop

Dear Taproom Friend & Baird Beer Enthusiast:

The wait is over; the Baird Beer online E-Shop is now officially open for business!

The Baird Beer E-Shop is actually two shops: one English and one Japanese (each can be accessed via the appropriate language section of our website). The Baird Beer E-Shop sells two things: (1) Baird Beer (both year-round and seasonal brands) and (2) Baird Beer accessory goods (T-shirts, glassware and posters). Delivery of beer and accessory goods is available only in Japan. Payment options available on the E-Shop are: (1) PayPal (via which you can use a credit card), (2) COD, and (3) bank wire transfer.

The impetus behind the building of a new Baird Beer E-Shop is the commitment we have to the following:

Maintenance and growth of direct sales of Baird Beer from brewery to consumer.
Offering an easy and pleasurable shopping experience to the ENTIRE Japan community through a completely bi-lingual format.
Providing consumers with purchase convenience through the selection of a diversity of simple and low-cost payment options.
Please give the new Baird Beer E-Shop a look and a try at your earliest convenience. I am sure that there remain some kinks to be worked out and we greatly appreciate both your input and understanding as we move ahead to create better and simpler access for the beer enthusiast to good craft beer in Japan.

Cheers & Yoroshiku,

Bryan Baird
Baird Brewing Company
Numazu, Japan
HOMEPAGE


The Japan Blog List

———————————
Must-see tasting websites:
-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery
——————————–
Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

—————————————-
日本語のブログ
—————————————-

Japanese Cake: Dorayaki-Basic Recipe

Dorayaki (どら焼き, どらやき, 銅鑼焼き, ドラ焼き) is a type of Japanese confection which consists of two small pancake-like patties made from castella wrapped around a filling of sweet red bean paste.

It has been made popular by the famous manga character, Doraemon.

Here is a simple recipe that will please children and adults alike!

Japanese Cake: Dorayaki!

INGREDIENTS: For 6

-Pancakes:
Eggs: 2
Sugar: 100 g
Honey: 1+1/2 tablespoons
Salad oil: 1 tablespoon
Mirin/sweet sake: 1 tablespoon
Sodium bicarbonate: 1/3 teaspoon
Flour: 150 g
Water: 40~60 cc/ml

-Salad oil for cooking

-Sweetmeats/Anko/Bean jam:
300 g: (50 g per dorayaki)Look HERE for basic recipe!

RECIPE:

-Use a hand whisker instead of an electric whisker/blender as overmixing will achieve poor results!
Respect the order of the ingredients!
Beat the eggs and add the sugar. Mix until the mixture whitens.
Add the honey and mix until it has completely nblended in.
Add oil and mix.
Add bicarbonate sodium and mix.
Add mirin and mix.

-Add half of flour and mix well.
Add other half and mix well.

-Add water and mix. The amount of water might vary with the kind of flour.
Experiment!

-Heat a frypan over a medium fire first.
take frypan off fire.
Lower fire.
Once the frypan has cooled down bring over the fire again.
Wipe it with a kitchen paper soaked with salad oil.
Wipe off excess oil if necessary.

-Pour pancake mixture. Bear in mind that the size of the panckes must be the same. The amount, whatever it is must be the same. Choose your ladle/spoon well beforehand!

-Cover with lid.

-When bubbles have appeared across the surface turn the pancake over.

-The very minimum of oil will garantee an even cooking!

-Too much oil and your pancake will have that look!

Sandwich sweetmeats/anko between two pancakes and serve hot.

Once cooled down you may deep-freeze them wrapped in cellophane paper.

A perfect look!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless Mama, Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice, The French Market Maven

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

—————————————-
日本語のブログ
—————————————-

Today’s Lunch Box/Bento (’10/07)

“You must eat more fish!” said the Missus this morning.
Alright, I love any fish as sushi or sashimi, but when it comes to cooked fish, The Japanese tend to include too much salt for my own liking with the result of emphasizing the “fishy smell and taste”.
I suppose I will have to hold myself on a leash for some time to come!LOL

The positive side of this morning’s (grumpy) conversation is that the Missus is planning to buy a cedar wood bento box for better presentation!

Today’s rice was her specialty: Steamed together with hijiki/sweet seaweed and tinned beans and their juice. It does make for good diet balance and colours.

My compulsory tamagoyaki/Japanese omelette, crucnhy sauteed renkon/lotus root and a sprig of fresh cress for the looks and Vitamin C.

Mini tomatoes for more Vitamin C, Na no Hana/Rape flowers, boiled and seasoned with sesame sauce and seeds for iron, and the fish: salted salmon the Missus fried with soy sauce and other seasoning.

And more Vitamin C with Benihoppe/red cheeks strawberry from Shizuoka and kiwi fruit.

Well-balanced bento, I agree.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

—————————————-
日本語のブログ
—————————————-