Category Archives: Food Health

French Gastronomy: Shizuoka Prefecture Gastronomic Week Lunch at Pissenlit in Shizuoka City!

Service: Excellent and very friendly.
Facilities: Great cleanliness overall. Superb washroom (mouthwash and toothpicks provided!)!
Prices: Reasonable to slightly expensive, very good value.
Strong points: Interesting wine list. Great use of local products, especially organic vegetables and Shizuoka-bred meat.

Chef Toru Arima/有馬亨さん at Restaurant Pissenlit in Shizauok City has been designated by the Shizuoka Prefecture Government as one of the top chefs promoting the gastronomy of our Prefecture.
The same Prefecture has designated the last two weeks of Septmber as the “Shizuoka Shoku no Bu Shigotonin Week/静岡食の部仕事人ウイーク/Shizuoka Gastronomy Craftsmen Week (although it lasts two!)”

The official poster printed by the Government!
Toru therefore conceived a special full lunch course menu for the occasion for 7,000 yen/70 Euros, extremely reasonable considering the quality!

The special menu also celebrated the 4th Anniversary of the opening of Pissenlit!

The restaurant was offered some magnificent bouquets for the occasion!

Chef Toru Arima/有馬亨さん at work!

The menu!
Actually it was more of a guideline as some items were changed according to the products available that day.
In fact two friends of mine who visited the place the following week-end were served two different versions!
Lucky ones!

Chef Toru Arima/有馬亨さん also initiated a great idea by offering local tea in lieu of alcohol for people who cannot drink or may not like on that particular day!
You can either have one variety prepared in two different ways for 200 yen or the whole set of three teas for 500 yen!

The first glass of “sencha/煎茶/decocted green tea”!

Eggplant/Aubergine Mousse! The aubergine came from Hirokawa garden in Mishima City
Most other vegetables on that day were organic and grown at Kitayama Garden in Fujinomiya City!

The second glass of “sencha/煎茶/decocted green tea” prepared in a slightly different way!

Marinated rainbow trout and iwana/Japanese char bred by Kakishima Trout Farm in Fujinomiya City!

Note the iwana skin baked to a crisp and the edible perilla/shiso flowers!

From another angle to show the vegetables placed between the fish including menegi/leek sprouts!

The first glass of “fuka mushi Cha/深蒸し茶/deeply steamed tea”!

A French classic with a Japanese/Shizuoka twits: (Shizuoka-grown) buckwheat pancake/galette with Amagi Shamo chicken (Bred in Shuzenji, Izu Peninsula) liver, heart and gizzards and poached egg with Utogi wasabi leaves!

For a better view of the delicate fine pieces of liver, heart and gizzards!

The poached egg!

The wasabi leaves!

Fresh buckwheat seeds!

Itoyodori/Golden threadfin bream from Suruga Bay, poele and served atop fine mashed potato cream and served with red paprika sauce and steamed/fried organic vegetables!

The fish was caught off Sagara in the western part of the Prefecture!

Shikaku mame/Square beans are getting increasingly popular in our Prefecture!

The second glass of “fuka mushi Cha/深蒸し茶/deeply steamed tea” prepared in a slightly different way!

Amagi Shamo Chicken bred in Horie Farm in Shuzenji, Izu peninsula, prepared in three different manners!

The thigh and its skin poele and baked, served with a wine sauce!

Breast, steamed and served with an unctuous Bleu d’Auvergne cheese sauce!

Half-raw sasami/breast fillets, cooked in “tataki” style!

Earl Grey Tea jelly before the next dish!

The first glass of Hoji Cha/ほじ茶/oven-roasted tea!

The second glass of Hoji Cha/ほじ茶/oven-roasted tea prepared in a slightly different manner!

The dessert!
It is a millefeuille but the contents are quite unusual!

The red fruit in the middle is actually eggplant/aubergine cooked in red wine!
Absolutely delicious and incredibly elegant!

Creme Chantilly and custard sauce!

Peach Sorbet with its fresh organic mint!

And coffee served as it should be with its mignardises!

Someday i will have to attend one of their wine-tasting dinners!

PISSENLIT
420-0839 Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Takajo, 2-3-4
Tel.: 054-270-8768
Fax: 054-627-3868
Business hours: 11:30~14:30; 17:00~22:00
Closed on Tuesdays and Sunday evening
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)
Credit Cards OK
Entirely non-smoking!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Japanese Recipe: Sauteed Vinegared Summer Vegetables (with vegetarian/vegan versions)

Summer, and the Fall in the case of Shizuoka. means an enormous supply of fresh vegetables and it would be a shame not to make the most out of it!
The Japanese love to use vinegar, especially rice vinegar and kuro su, black rice vunegar, with many dishes. It basically replaces the role of lemon juice in western cuisines.
Here is a simple recipe that should please all members of the family and also serve as a great snack!
For vegetarians and vegans just ignore the meat!

INGREDIENTS: (For 4 persons)

Meat (pork or beef thinly sliced) 100 g
Cabbage: 4~5 leaves
Carrot: a little
Onion: 1/2
Shishito/thin green peppers: 6
Cucumber: 1 (japanese style. If not use a small one)
Egg plant: 1
Zucchini: One 6-cm long piece
Mini tomatoes: 10
Edamame: a few

Vegetables for flavoring:
Garlic: 1 clove, chopped
Fresh ginger root: One cube (2x2x2 cm), chopped
Leek: 2 tablespoons, chopped
Red chili pepper: 1~2

Others:
Sesame oil: 1 teaspoon
Vegetable oil: as much as needed for frying

Sauce:
Water: 100 ml (1/2 cup)
Soy sauce: 5 tablespoons
Black rice vinegar (“kuro su”): 1 + 1/2 tablespoons
Sugar: 3 tablespoons
Slat: 1 pinch
Cornstrach: 1 tablespoon

RECIPE:

Cut/break cabbage leaves into bite size.
Cut the carrot into strips.
Slice the shishito peppers in halves or quarters lengthwise. Discard the seeds.
Slice the onion into 1 cm thick slices.
Cut the cucumber lengthwise into four strips and slice into bite size.
Cut the eggplant lengthwise and slice into 6 mm thick slices.
Cut the zucchini into 3 mm thick half moon slices.
Cut the red chili pepper in halves. Discrad seeds.
Boil the edamame (unless you can get them in cans) and take beans out.
Slice the meat into bit size.

Bear in mind that vegetables that cook easily should be cut into bits bigger than vegetables that take more time to cook.
Prepare everything beforehand for practicality, easy access and speedy cooking!

Mix the ingredients of the sauce well beforehand.

Pour 2 tablespoons of oil in a wok. drop the finely chopped vegetables for flavoring. When smell comes starting coming out, add meat and fry (skip the meat step if you are vegan/vegetarian and proceed to next step!)

Add and fry zucchini, eggplant and carrot first. If oil becomes insufficient add a little.

Add all the other vegetables and fry.

Add the sauce (stir it again to make sure that the cornstarch has dissolved) and pour over vegetables as oon as they are cooked to your satisfaction. Stir/sautee the lot for 5 seconds. Add sesame oil and stir only once. Pour the whole into serving dish.

Enjoy this Japanese-style Chinese food!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Rainbow Trout, Iwana Trout & Sakura Trout at Kakishima Trout Farm in Fujinomiya City!

Iwana Trout!

Last Wednesday I travelled all the way up to a site 700 meters high on the slopes of Mount Fuji in Fujinomiya City to visit arguably the best Trout Farm in Japan (there are 4 more companies in Fujinomiya City alone!) in the company of Chefs and Farmers from Central Shizuoka Prefecture who have just created a group called “Wasabi No Kai” to promote good food from production to the table!

The Wasabi No Kai” group of chefs (French, Italian and Spanish gastronomy in this case) a wine shop owner and a farmer from Fujieda City in discussion with the the President of Kakishima Trout Farm.

Mrs. Izumi Iwamoto/岩本いづみ!

It was another blistering hot day even in the morning with temperatures in the middle 30’s, but it did not prevent Mrs. Izumi Iwamoto, the 2nd generation owner of Kakishima Trout Farm, to take us on a grand tour of the premises with a wealth of explanations and information!

The fish farm was established 35 years ago in Fujinomiya City (the company has two other farms in Kannami and Izu City with a total of 8 staff) in a spot located at 700 meter altitude on the slopes of Mount Fuji because of the constant access to natural water at a constant temperature around 12 degrees for an ideal environment for fish farming.

One just has to take the water from the abundant waterfalls and streams nearby!

The water is funneled into concrete open-air tanks covered with nets to protect them from birds and falling leaves in particular.

The water goes through nets at the entrance of each tank to filter any debris out.

The water is then allowed to flow constantly through the tanks.

The water is finally released back into the nature.
The water will never be used twice or allowed to stagnate, ensuring the safety of the fish and their meat.
Thanks to this constant help from the nature a great load of the work is taken off the staff’s shoulders who are constantly busy feeding the fish, repairing the nets, cleaning the tanks, clearing the surroundings and what else!

All the nature surrounding the farm is free from any agrichemicals or pesticides which might find their way into the water!

Enormous iwana up to 2 kg apiece!
It takes no less than 2 years to bring such a fish to maturity!

TKaushi Trout Farm breeds Iwana Trout/岩魚/”Rock Fish”, an indigenous Japanese branch of char, Niji Masu/虹鱒/Rainbow trout and a small number of Sakura Masu/桜鱒/Cherry Trout. The annual total production (including the other two farms) is 200 tonnes.

A 2-kg Iwana!

Rainbow trouts!

It is dawn to dusk work, even for Mrs. Iwamoto who had woken up at 5:00 a.m. to feed the fish in the company of her son before welcoming us for her interview!

Not only the fish has to be prepared for delivery (with plenty of ice in summer!) in safe packaging every day but also live to many fishing ponds all over the nation! Actually they are the only company in Japan capable to provide live fighting fish for the pleasure of anglers and gastronomes!

But for all the ideal natural environment and the daily care the main concern is feed!
And 35 years of experience and personal research were certainly not too much.
They used to produce their feed with half of it home-made and half bought, especially Peruvian anchovy.

But due to the price increase and quality decrease of the latter they decided to use Japanese meal (Yaizu bonito for example) for better and safer traceability.
Trouts are voracious fish and they have to be fed every morning!

The feed is a strict and constant mixture of higher quality fish, wheat, vitamins and natural salt.
No shortcuts like oily or fatty components are used to accelerate the growth of the fish.
From this very year all feed is completely natural, even including cocoa husks for polyphenols!
Mrs. Iwamamoto is always carrying a colormeter with her to check the color and leanness of the flesh of their fish!

But even so, nature itself can bring all these efforts to produce extravagant fish to nought: a particularly ferocious typhoon carried away or killed all the fish two years ago!

Iwana Trout at Kagetsu Restaurant in Fujinomiya City!

Kakishima Trout farm fish are gaining a greatly deserved celebrity in our Prefecture and are recognized as Shizuoka Prefecture Agricultural Products by the Government and gastronomic restaurants are hurrying to better know and acquire their fish!
Expect to find their fish in coming reports on local restaurants!

KAKISHIMA TROUT FARM Co.

Office: 419-0115, Shizuoka Prefecture, Tago Gun, Kannami Cho, Shinden, 125-1
Tel.: 055-970-3031
Fax: 055-970-3032
Mobile: 090-6942-3438 (Mrs. Izumi Iwamoto)
Mail address: izumi_iwamoto@kakishima-troutfarm.com

Main Farm: 418-0108 Shizuoka Prefecture, Fujinomiya City, Inozo, nakamura. 495-1
Tel.: 0544-52-0181
Fax: 0544-52-0216

HOMEPAGE (Japanese)

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Takuan Recipe: Japanese Cold Takuan Pasta (with Vegan Version)

Takuan in Japan is usually eaten at the end of the meal with rice and miso soup, but there are ways to accomodate it Western-style!
Here is a suggestion for a cold pasta recipe for a light refreshing dish during the summer heat.
As for a vegan version use vegan pasta!

INGREDIENTS: (for 2 people)

Pasta (or vegan pasta): 200 g
Takuan: 50 g (cut into thick filaments)
Cucumber: 100 g (cut inot thick filaments)
Salted konbu seaweed: 20 g (cut into thick filaments)
Roasted sesame seeds: A little

RECIPE:

Boil the pasta to your liking in 2 liters of water and 1 tablespoon of salt.

Prepare aside the takuan and cucumber (small and crunchy Japanese style) cut into thick filaments and salted konbu seaweed.

Transfer the boiled pasta into a bowl full of icy water.
Drain well.

In a bowl drop the pasta, takuan, cucumber and seaweed and mix well.
Note: Use your imagination if you want to add taste and seasoning but keep in mind you don’t need any more salt!
Suggestions: sesame oil, umeboshi meat, gomadare/sesame dressing, etc.

Serve in a plate and sprinkle wit roasted sesame seeds!

For more color and taste you could add thinly cut pimento!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Vegan Japanese recipe: Fried and Marinated Eggplants with Paprika

Vegan cuisine can be a very easy concept making the best out of simple and tasty ingredients!
here is another simple way to accomodate eggplants the Japanese way!

INGREDIENTS: (for 2~3 people)

Eggplants: 3^4
White wine vinegar (or Japanese rice vinegar): 1 tablespoon
Paprika powder: as much as you want!
Salt: 1/2 teaspoon

RECIPE:

Clean the eggplants. Wipe them and cut them into one bite pieces.

In a pan pour olive oil. Heat the pan over a low fire.
Throw in all the eggplants.
Fry until heat has penetrated the eggplants well. Add teh vinegar.
Cover with a lid and cook over medium fire until the greater part of water/sauce has disappeared.

Transfer into a recipient Let cool down. Keep inside therefrigerator.
Serve chilled sprinkled with plenty of paprika powder!
Naturally you can add color and taste served topped with fresh herbs!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Vegan Japanese Recipe: Japanese-style Sweet & Sour Eggplants

Eggplants or Aubergines or Nasu/茄子 in Japanese are a very popular vegetable in Japan whose people have many recipes of their own that would satisfy many vegans and vegetarians worldwide.
These recipes are simple and the ingredients should be easy to obtain!
Sweet & sour sauces basically originate from China but Japan has its own versions, albeit lighter in texture and taste!

Japanese-style Sweet & Sour Eggplants

INGREDIENTS: (for 2 people)

Eggplants: 2~3
Freshly grated ginger: 1 tablespoon
Green shiso/perilla: 5 leaves
Soy sauce: 2 tablespoons
Sugar: 1 and a half tablespoons
Salad oil: 1 large tablespoon and a little
Golden sesame seeds: as appropriate

RECIPE:

Take off stem part and cut eggplants lengthwise in four. Clean under running cold water. Wipe off all water with kitchen paper.

In a skillet pour the oil and fry the eggplants until they have attained a nice color.

In a large bowl drop the soy sauce, grated ginger and sugar. Mix well. Add the shiso leaves finely cut in thin strips. mix quickly.

Add the fried eggplants in the bowl. Stir them gently as to cover them completely. Let soak them in for at least 5 minutes. The fact that the eggplants are hot will melt the sugar and help them absorb the sauce.

Place the eggplants in a dish. Pour all the sauce on top and sprinkle sesame seeds on top.
The Japanese eat such a dish in summer at room temperature.
Great snack with beer!

Here is a variation with the same ingredients with mini tomatoes and shishito hot chilies added for more color and presentation. And taste, of course!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Vegan Japanese Dashi/Soup Stock: The Basic Recipe (re-published)

So many times have I heard my vegan and vegetarian friends complain about the fact that most dashi/soup stock is not done according to their priorities in Japan, making it impossible for them to enjoy food in this country.
Fortunately, this is a big misconception. Vegan dashi exists and is very easy to make or request.
Now, to make sure that the same friends can savour Japanese food, either at home or with friends, here is the basic ans simple recipe!
Please save or copy this recipe for future reference!

Vegan Japanese Dashi/Soup Stock

INGREDIENTS: (multiply according to demand. This is the minimum quantity!)

Konbu as sold in Japan

Konbu out of its packaging

-Konbu/dried thick dark seaweed: 5cm×5cm piece (dry)
-Water: 400cc/ml
-Japanese sake: 1 tablespoon (don’t worry, the alcohol will disappear upon heating/cooking!)
-Mirin/sweet sake (same comments as above!): 2 tablespoons
-Soy sauce: 2 and a half tablespoons

RECIPE:

Pour the water into a large pan. Drop the seaweed into the water.
Switch on the fire.
The moment bubbles appear on the surface of the konbu, the water will start sucking the its essence in.
At that time add soy sauce, sake and mirin.

Taste from time to time to decide when taste suits you best.
Switch off fire then and take konbu out.
Let cool completely, pour it inside a bottle. Seal the bottle properly and store inside refrigerator.
Use it as soon as possible.

The seaweed doesn’t have to be thrown away. It is edible as it is once cooked!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery