SHIZUOKA GOURMETS

Japanese Fast Food

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日本語のブログ
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Fast food is not an American invention. And our friends on the other side of the Pacific Ocean may not even boast the dubious title of the biggest junk food producer. The Chinese and Japanese are way ahead!

Italian “invented” slow food, but as far as as fast food is concerned, the French may claim to be the initiators when Napoleon ordered the production of the first-ever canned food in 1810!

Japan, as demonstrated in other firleds, is a living contradiction. Here you have nation which prides itself, deservedly, in creating arguably some of the best gastronomy in the World. On the other hand, it has become a paradise for junk food packet collectors!
Some establishments go as far as advertising their food as “junk food” (see pic above taken in Shizuoka City)!
An interesting twist is that the Japanese make a point of advertising their “fast food” as “instant food”!

Americans have the hamburger, which incidentally could make for a properly balanced meal if fries (don’t call them French, they are Belgian!) and soda drinks (no names here as someone might sue me!) were not adding as many calories (empty) on top of the most popular meat contraption (no names, either!) in The US and the World.

Ramen is the exact replica in Japan when it comes to unwanted salt, empty calories and what else when served at cheap food stands, or dehydrated in “convenience stores” and supermarkets.
Do not misunderstand me: ramen can make for a great meal too with the correct addition of fresh greens, fresh meat or fish!

But more dangerous, because they are the epitome of practicality, are the notorious “Cup Noodles” whose concept has been adopted under many guises all over the World, even on planes!
Next time you order or buy one cup for a quick fix, ponder a while on the amount of salt, preservatives, additives and more that you are going to inject into your system!

N.B.: Whereas I’m careful about citing American brand names, “Cup Noodles”, although a brand name, is considered as a variety of food, not a particular brand.
That is unless someone somewhere begs to differ!

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