Tag Archives: レシピ

Today’s Bento/Lunch Box (7)


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For once the Missus had to bring my Tuesday’s bento to my office before she went to work as I had to leave very early to attend a Primary School Graduation Ceremony away along Abe River.
It was quite a hearty one I must say!
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The “Salad” part consisted of fresh cabbage, cress, tomato and “Tori no Tsukune”/Sauteed Chicken Balls wrapped in shiso/perilla leaves. All vegetables are locally grown.
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The “Rice” part consisted of Maki/Rolls made of sushi rice mixed with “Tobiko”/Flying Fish Roe contained smoked salmon with thin leeks and wrapped in lettuce. I’m sure Allison will be interested! “Kamaboko Dango”/balls of fish paste (steamed and filled with tuna or cheese bought at the supermarket) and pickled cucumber and “Gobo”/Burdock Roots we bought in Kyoto last Friday.

I can tell you I was full and happy!

Ekiben/Station Bento (1): Minato Aji Zushi


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“Ekiben” is the abreviation for “Eki”/Railway Station and “Ben”/Bento-Lunch box.
These packed lunches are extremely popular in Japan (I counted more than 90 in Shizuoka Prefecture alone!), as not only they make for a very satisfying lunch during a long trip, but they are usually made up with local ingredients, thus offering a good idea of what is eaten in the particular region you are visiting or going through!

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I found this limited seasonal (Spring only) ekiben at Mishima JR Station Shinkasen Platform.
It is actually made in nearby Numazu City, one of the major fishing harbours in Japan (it does have a JR Station, but no Shinkasen stops there), and consists of Aji (sebream) sushi.
The lunch includes three types of sushi: nigiri (a piece of fish atop a ball of rice) secured by a band of pickled cherry tree leaf, another nigiri made up of a ball of rice mixed with the same fish inside a pouch made of pickled cherry tree leaf and a sushi maki also envelopped in pickled cherry tree leaf instead of the usual “nori”/seaweed. The fish is caught and pickled in Numazu City, therefore absolutely safe for consumption.

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The beauty is that we are provided with a piece of real fresh Wasabi (from Amagi Plateau in Izu Peninsula) with a grater and soy sauce!
You could not find something more typical of Shizuoka Prefecture!

Today’s Bento/Lunch Box (6)


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Today’s bento, what with all the eating and drinking during the week-end, was a light affair.
It turned out to be of the “expat” (European/American) style and could well appeal to Rowena, Allison and Biggie!

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I wonder how I could call those “nigiri/rice balls”. They are of the “loose/soft” variety, made with “shari/sushi rice” mixed with chopped Japanese green cucumber pickles and “tobikko/flying fish roe” with a slice of French cucmber pickle and tartare sauce in its core and pieces of smoked salmon, seasoned with lemon juice and capers, randomly inserted. The nigiri are served in lettuce for easy eating as they tend to crumble away easily.

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The salad consisted of semi-soft-boiled eggs, greens, plum tomatoes and pieces of Shizuoka-made Gouda cheese.

Problem is that my (?) half forgot to include some dressing I had to buy in a local shop! LOL

Today’s Bento/Lunch Box (5)


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Usually, on Monday, my bento/lunch box consist of (home-made) sandwiches and I do not bother to describe them. But today, the Missus reverted back to normal Bento. I hope Rubber Slippers In Italy will like it!
DeLuscious Life might also be tempted for its balance!

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Rice came under the form of three “nigiri/rice balls” of rice mixed with “umeboshi/Japanese pickkled plums” and “goma/sesame” partially envelopped in “shiso/perilla” leaves and accompanied by three kinds of “tsukemono/pickles”: home-made wasabi stems and leaves pickles, red daikon pickles, and home-made “asabata” daikon pickles

As for the “garnish”
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(From left to right), potato, cucumber and pepper ham salad, deep-fried cuttle fish dumplings wrapped in lettuce, boiled mini asparaguses and mini corn, cherry tomatoes.

All meade from “leftovers”!

Vegetarian Cuisine: Tempura (3)


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Last night, not only did we enjoy great sashimi ( see earlier article ) at Bu-Ichi, but also savoured some beautiful tempura that would have vegetarinas come running!

From top to bottom, left to right:
“Fuki no To”/Butterbur, Brocoli.
“Renkon”/ Lotus roots, Asparaguses.
“Maitake” Mushrooms, Shiitake mushrooms,
“Satsuma Imo”/Yam.

Served with salt and pepper. No need for sauce!

BU ICHI
Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Ryogae-cho, 1-6-10, Dai Ni Matsunaga Bldg., 2F
Tel.: 054-2521166
Business hours: 17:30~23:00
Closed on Wednesdays

Today’s Bento/Lunch Box (4)


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Tuesday is basically the day when my better half (I’d better say not my worse, or Rubber Slippers in Italy will clobber me!) is preparing me a solid rice-based bento. She tries to keep it both balanced and hearty as it is a long day until dinner.

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So she concocted three “nigiri/rice balls” of steamed rice mixed with finely chopped Japanese green cucumber pickles topped with pitted “umeboshi/pickled Japanese plums” of the sweet variety, or I shall end with too much salt, as it was accompanied by French pickles/cornichons, home-made red turnip pickles and Kyoto-style “shibazuke/pickled cucumbers”. “Pickled Cucumbers” uber alles, as you can see!
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The fare to accompany the rice consisted of “kara-age”/deep-fried chicken. This is one dish whose secret my wife has always steadfastly refused to reveal. The only thing I know is that it involves a two-step frying process… Lettuce and plum-tomato grown in Shizuoka Prefecture, a medium soft boiled egg and some potato and broad bean salad. I was given a few “mikan”/mandarines for dessert and needed vitamin C.

By the way, I’d like to take this opportunity to introduce a lady from the States who lived quite a few years in Japan before going back home and devising a professional Bento Website called Lunch in a Box! You will find all you need to know there to prepare lunch for your own and loved ones!

Home-style Donburi


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You do not have to go to a Japanese restaurant or sushi bar to eat “donburi” if you happen to have a wife who not only likes them but can also concoct them!
In short, my better (worse?) half came up with following for lunch:

Plain steamed rice topped with slices of “akami”/ lean tuna part, avocado salad with mayonnaise and wasabi pickles (the latter provided a nice balance with a spicy touch), boiled sirasu/whitebait sprinkled with “hijiki” seaweed and “tobikko”/flying fish roe.
The tobikko added a nice colour finish touh. It is quite cheap down here in Shizuoka City. From I saw on Chuckeats Blog, it seems quite a treat over there in the U.S.!
I poured a little Shizuoka-made wasabi dressing on top. This dressing is a lot milder than pure grated wasabi with a little sweetness which combines well with the fish!

Today’s Bento/Lunch Box (3)


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When I talked about today’s bento/lunch box with my better (worse?) half last night I “ordered” plenty of vegetables to help me recuperate from the usual heavy toll my body takes on week-ends.
Here what she came up with:
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Three “nigiri” rice balls, left with “hijiki” seaweed and amatare/sweet sauce, centre with “umeboshi”/salted Japanese plum and right, with “hujiki” seaweed and sesame seeds.
A piece of processed cheese, French pickles and homemade Japanese pickles.
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Boiled brocoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, white sausage from Fukuroi City and chorizo sausages. Dressing came apart.
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Boiled eggs mimosa-style on a two-tiered vegetable bed of beans and small greens, boiled mini asparaguses and cherry tomatoes. Dressing served apart.
A few biscuits for dessert to go with coffee. Et voila!

Today’s Bento/Lunch Box (2)

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Tuesday is one of my “regular bento day”!
Well, today my better (worse?) half happened to have some fresh “anago”/conger eel ready.
She concocted “Anago Kabayaki Shirashizushi”
She first prepared sushi rice that she mixed later with some finely chopped cold Japanese pickles.
She then cooked sweet Japanese-style scrambled eggs she spread over the rice after they had cooled off.
She then made Anago Kamayaki. This usually done over a grill, but she cut the fish into appropriate pieces and fried with Japanese seasoning. Once cooked she mixed them with Tare/Japanese sauce in a bowl and placed them over the rice. The last touch was Italian parsley leaves on top of each fish piece:

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As for the salad to go with it (Vitamins C…), she used already greens topped with cheese, pickles and boiled baby corn. The dressing was added separately for later seasoning!

Today’s Bento/Lunch Box (1)

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It seems that lunch boxes, bento in Japanese, are increasingly becoming popular with foreigners, not only in Japan but with a lot of former of expats who spread the word back home.
Since my better (worse?) half does have to prepare a bento for me at least three times a week, It is only doing justice to her to introduce what she concocts (I will ot impose the sandwiches I sometimes “order”!) with a lot of care, I must admit.

Today’s fare was “hijiki gohan”, rice steamed with hijiki seaweed, carrots, soy sauce, sake and I do not know what else, with some homemade Japanese pickles. The accompanying “dish” is from bttom to top, left to right, “kamaboko/fish paste” inserted with Shizuoka-made “wasabizuke/pickled wasabi”, boiled eggs, sweet violet yams dessert stew/”murasaki satsuma imo ni”, fresh plum tomatoes, roast pork and sauce, French pickles/”cornichons”, lettuce and greens!

A complete lunch as you can se!
Look forward to the next posting!

Shizuoka Hotsprings: Atagawa Dai-Ichi Hotel

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Report and pictures courtesy of Patrick Harrington

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Atagawa Dai Ichi Hotel
413-0302, Kamo Gun, Higashi Izu Machi, Naramoto, 1267-2, Izu Atagawa Hotsprings
Tel.: 0557-23-2200
Prices: 10,500~16,800 per person per night, breakfast and dinner included.

You might think that a visit to Atagawa in East Izu City would be solely for the delights of a hot spring soak. But the Atagawa Daichi Hotel is no one-trick pony. Indeed it has its indoor and outdoor spas, complete with scenic views of the sea below. But we had read from customers’ comments that the food in this mid-priced hotel was surprisingly good.
And it was.

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Everything was served together. Two bowls were heated by wax candles, and as these simmered away we tucked into the multitude of dishes on offer.
In one bowl were some skewered gingko nuts with azuki beans. In another were some chunks of radish and carrot in a soy marinade. My favourite was a very small dish containing some fresh seaweed with grated yuzu.
And the chawamushi was full of beans, chicken, and some tasty green leaves.
To be honest, even though there was an enormous array of dishes this kind of meal can be had in any number of decent hotel restaurants in Shizuoka and other prefectures.
Indeed the centrepiece, the sashimi platter, contained only three kinds of sushi: tuna, squid and mackerel. However the sashimi was just about perfect, firm but tender, smooth yet tasty. And this was true throughout the meal, everything was so fresh and carefully cooked.
Then we tried the hot plates that were now ready. in one was juicy pork with cabbage, in the other kinmedai fish, a local speciality, which was so tender, with thin noodles, Chinese cabbage, large mushrooms and assorted vegetables. A complimentary glass of local strawberry wine was also provided.
With unlimited rice there was no room for dessert which was just as well, since there wasn’t any, except a ponkan!

After the meal, which was served in our room, we sat by the window and watched the Christmas firework display, which reminded me of my taste buds.

Takoyaki: Yokoyama

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On Chritsmas Eve, of all dates, I paid a visit to an old favourite, Yokoyama.
This is the only place serving not only delicious, but authentic “takoyaki”.
“Takoyaki” are dumplings filled with boiled octopus cooked on a hot plate and later served with sauce and dry bonito shavings/katsuo bushi.
Yokoyama, an unpretentious minuscule shop, has a history dating back to the first days after WWII when they first offered “daigakuimo”. I cannot recall when they changed their prices, a sure sign of their popularity. At 420 yen a plate (a dozen dumplings), they do make for a great body-warming lunch or snack for anyone, Japanese or expat.
Now, people usually buy them as takeout, but I would definitely advise you to eat them freshly cooked and hot from the grill. You will have the opportunity to smear them them with plenty of their delicious home-made sauce. The owner told me he has to fence off insistent questions and queries on a daily basis about their sauce from people coming as far as Tokyo. It is and will be a well-kept secret.

Yokoyama
Address: Shizuoka Shi, Koya-machi, 13-1, Yokoyama Bldg, 1F
Tel.: 054-2520312
Opening hours: 10:00~20:00.
Closed on Mondays and third Tuesday.
Takoyaki, 420 yen. Daigakuimo, 210 yen. Kaki Koori (Crushed ice flavoured with syrup in Summer only), 320~470 yen.

Simple Recipes: Bonito Sushi

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My better (worse?) half came up with this idea after she got hold of quality “katsuo tataki” (slightly grilled bonito).
She prepared the sushi rice balls according to tradition with the addition of fine pieces of pickled fresh ginger (as this is the season rigt now).

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She then placed a slice of bonito seasoned with ponzu with more thin sliced pickled ginger, “tobikko” (flying fish roe) and finley chopped thin leeks>

Great with sake!