Tag Archives: 焼き鳥

Yakitori-Kushiyaki Restaurant: Kushiyaki Taisho in Shizuoka City!

Service: Very friendly
Facilities & Equipment: Great overall cleanliness
Prices: Reasonable
Strong points: great variety of yakitori, kushiyaki and other izakaya-style food. Good drinks menu including local sake and wine.

Kazuo Kawasumi/川澄一雄さん is a very enterprising businessman. After opening his first two restaurants in Kofu City and Hiratsuka City, he just started his third restaurant in busy Koya-machi in Shizuoka City and is already planning to open his fourth and last one all for himself in Shimada City after having made sure his family members are taking proper care of his establishments!

The entrance is unusual for a Kushiyaki-Yakitori Restaurant! You might be excused if you mistook it for a Chinese restaurant!

it opens at 4 in the afternoon and you will be offered a complimentary glass of beer if you enter the place before 6 o’clock!

The inside decoration is in complete contrast with the outside, showing the owner’s love for the sea!

Actually, Kazuo San does manage English so don’t worry if you can’t read the menu!

Ordering sets of 5, 10 or 20 sticks can become a good bargain!

The MOH at work, always with a smile!

Great sake available as this Garyubai by Sanwa Brewery in Shimizu Ku, Shizuoka City!

Let me introduce what we sampled on that day!
Kawa negi/Chicken skin and chopped leeks.

Plenty of side dishes are on offer such as kimchi!

Sasami mentaiko (for the Missus!)/chicken fillets seasoned with spicy cod eggs.

Hon-jiri/Chicken derrieres!

Ninniku bekon/Garlic stems wrapped in bacon.

The specialty of the house: Tsukune! Minced chicken sticks!

Chicken liver in tare sauce (for me!).

Vegetables and deep-fried wantan salad.

Ebi Harumaki age/Deep-fried shrimps spring rolls!

Sasami wasabi/Chicken fillets seasoned with grated wasabi sauce!

Yakitroi/plain but beautiful chicken!

To be followed… So many more morsels to sample!

KUSHIYAKI TAISHO/串焼大将
Shizuoka CityAoi Ku, Koya Machi, 4-27, Morikawa Bldg. 1F
Tel.: 054-255-3543
Opening hours: 16:00~24:00
HOMEPAGE

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Yakitori Cutting Techniques 7: Shiri/”Hips”

Shiri is often called “hips” in Japanese language. Actually it means bottom/derriere!
I still remember my Mum reserving that morsel for herself every time she roasted a whole chicken: “le cul est pour moi! The ass is for me!” LOL
In any case a healthy chicken should have a prominent “tail”! bear in mind it is not all fat as the chicken need themuscles to strut along its tail erected!

As shown on pic above, insert the knife and cut around the small bone and the meat attached to it.

Cut the fat around the sphincter/anus and discard it together with the sphincter.

Do that operation on both sides. Look at the pic above: you will discard the pieces of fat below the cut hips.

Insert the stick/skewer in the meat passing it just under the bone.

The stick is ready. The bone is a bit hard but succulent with the fat around it.

Now, if you don’t want the bone, cut around the bone as carefully as possible laving no meat or fat with it.

When instering the stick in the cut pieces, respect the same order skin fat/meat for even cooking.

Here are the complete sticks of boneless hips.
Now bear in mind they will cook faster and look smaller!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles, Skewer It!

Please check the new postings at:
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Yakitori Cutting Techniques 6: Liver & Heart

Interestingly enough, the Japanese call Liver, “rebaa” and Heart, haarto”, which nothing less than the Japanized pronunciation of the English words!
Naturally, liver in Japanese is “kanzou” and heart “jinzou”, but this refers more to anatomy than gastronomy!

It goes without much saying that you have to use absolutely fresh ingredients!
First wash in clear running cold water.
Peel off the soft thin skin off the heart and cut/discard any veins or blood vessels.
Take off fat but only within reason as it contributes to tasty morsels!

Separate the liver lobes.
Discard veins/blood vessels if you discover them.

Cut the lobes across into pieces big/small enough for easy grilling.

Cut the hearts legthwise to two thirds of their thickness as shown on above picture.
Discard any veins/blood vessels or blood matter.

Skewer the hearts with a stick. Two of them should be enough.
It is easier than it looks.
You may skewer the livers and hearts together but you will ened up in uneven cooking. Better separate them!

Skewer the liver with a stick. Three pieces is best for balance.

Here you are!

Now, you could make the sticks longer and the pieces bigger or liver and heart whole, but personally, the smaller the yummier it looks!
These are more or less appetizers, after all!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles, Skewer It!

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Yakitori Cutting Techniques 5: Zuri/Sunazuri/Sunagimo/Gizzards

Gizzards are the two sticks in front. The back two are liver.

SYNOPSIS:

Looking at my friends Island Vittles and Skewer It! blogs on yakitori I decided to start a series on that worldwide known Japanese specialty that is “Yakitori/焼き鳥/”Grilled Chicken”.
I hope that this series of postings on various basic recipes will help her and all other foodies interested in that simple, healthy and so delicious delicacy!

This particular series will deal with the cutting techniques which should help you make your own yakitori at home!

Bear in mind than some ingredients such as skin or gizzards might not be considered proper or healthy in some cultures!

Yakitori Cutting Techniques 5: Zuri/Sunazuri/sunagimo/Gizzards:

First clean the gizzards in fresh running cold water.
Cut out the red parts on both sides, left and right as shown in picture and discard.

Cut in half as shown above.

Cut off as much as you can of the hard skin as shown above. A bit difficult, I agree, but ry to cut out and discard only the hard white part. Well, as much as you can!

Pass the stick through each cut folded in two with the white part inside as shown above. This will prevent the gizzards from folding out. Count 3 to each stick.

Here you are!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles, Skewer It!

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Yakitori Cutting Techniques 4: Kawa/Skin

SYNOPSIS:

Looking at my friends Island Vittles and Skewer It! blogs on yakitori I decided to start a series on that worldwide known Japanese specialty that is “Yakitori/焼き鳥/”Grilled Chicken”.
I hope that this series of postings on various basic recipes will help her and all other foodies interested in that simple, healthy and so delicious delicacy!

This particular series will deal with the cutting techniques which should help you make your own yakitori at home!

Yakitori Cutting Techniques 4: Kawa/Neck:

The best part for kawa/skin yakitori arguably come from the neck of the chicken (choose a large specimen with a long neck!LOL), but other parts are ok. Still, strive for quality!

Scrape most of the fat from the inside of the skin and discard. Too much fat left and the taste will drop with an increase in smoke. Still, leave a little!

This is haow it should look after scaping.

Spread the skin and cut in strips 25 mm/half an inch wide.

Stab skins with a skewer to form yakitori about 30~40 g each stick.

The finished product!

To make a single stick you will need 50 g of neck skin, fat included.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles, Skewer It!

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Yakitori Cutting Techniques 3: Negima/Neck & Leeks

SYNOPSIS:

Looking at my friends Island Vittles and Skewer It! blogs on yakitori I decided to start a series on that worldwide known Japanese specialty that is “Yakitori/焼き鳥/”Grilled Chicken”.
I hope that this series of postings on various basic recipes will help her and all other foodies interested in that simple, healthy and so delicious delicacy!

This particular series will deal with the cutting techniques which should help you make your own yakitori at home!

Yakitori Cutting Techniques 3: Negima/Neck & Leeks:

“Negima/葱真” liteerally means “leeks in between”.
It is a very popular way of preparing yakitori and provides a great nutrition balance.
Note that negima can also be written 葱鮪 which means that tuna is used instead of chicken. Some people argue that it was the original form of negima!

-One uses the neck meat from the chicken. I told you taht everything can be used. If you don’t believe me, wait until the next postings! LOL
-Choose a long and comparatively thin leek with a clear white and green part.

-Cut the leek into 25 mm/1 inch pieces.
-Keep white and green pieces separate.
-If the white part is too thick, cut in half as shown in picture.

-Cut the thick part of the neck meat into 25~40 mm/1 inch~1 inch and half long pieces.
Cut the thin part of the neck into 40~50 mm/ 1 inch and a half~2 inches long pieces.

-Skewer in this order:
1) One piece of th thin part of the neck meat
2) Green leek piece
3) One piece of the thick part of the neck meat
4) White leek piece
5) One piece of the thick part of the neck meat

This will provide even exposure to the fire/grill

As the white part of the leek is longer skewer them separately for a nice combination! That latter is called “ikada”.
One meat skewer should weigh about 30 g.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles, Skewer It!

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Yakitori Cutting Techniques 2: Breast

SYNOPSIS:

Looking at my friends Island Vittles and Skewer It! blogs on yakitori I decided to start a series on that worldwide known Japanese specialty that is “Yakitori/焼き鳥/”Grilled Chicken”.
I hope that this series of postings on various basic recipes will help her and all other foodies interested in that simple, healthy and so delicious delicacy!

This particular series will deal with the cutting techniques which should help you make your own yakitori at home!

Yakitori Cutting Techniques 2: Breast:

-If you haven’t obtained the full chicken, choose a good quality chicken breast cut with all its skin. Check that the latter is frim and fresh. Frozen skin will not achieve the best results!

-Looking at the picture above, make a “high cut”by separating the comparatively fat part (left on pic but right in reality) from the more irregular part (right on the pic, but left in reality) because it is the spot where the wing joint is found.

-Cut the wing joint part into 25 mm/1 inch square pieces.
The fat part of the breast could be cut into the same pieces, but it would be a bit of an overkill.
Better would be to grill it whole skin down until the skin has turned crispy. Do not grill on the other side. Doing so the meat will still be half rare inside,making for a “juicy and tender” morsel best enjoyed with some ponzu instead of sauce/tare!
Serve it whole or cut into thin slices.

-Insert the skewer through the pieces with the skin surface always pointing forward for even cooking!

-If you decided after all to do the same with the “fat” part, bear in mind not to overcook it! In that case larger cuts would be better. The trick would be to have all the skin parts facing down and grill them skin down only!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles, Skewer It!

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Yakitori Cutting Techniques 1: Leg

SYNOPSIS:

My friend Island Vittles has decided to start a series on that worldwide known Japanese specialty that is “Yakitori/焼き鳥/”Grilled Chicken”.
I hope that this series of postings on various basic recipes will help her and all other foodies interested in that simple, healthy and so delicious delicacy!

This particular series will deal with the cutting techniques which should help you make your own yakitori at home!

Yakitori Cutting Techniques 1: Leg:

You may of course buy legs separately, but it might prove a great idea to buy a fresh whole chicken and prepare it completely as yakitori for once!
In any case if you have only legs, here how you should go about it!

-Use the legs with their skin on if possible. It makes for so much tastier yakitori!
Separate the meat into upper leg (right) and lower leg (left).
Upper leg meat is more tender than lower leg meat because of tendons.

-Cut upper leg meat into approximately 25 mm/1 inch thick strips.
Do the same with lower leg meat.
Bear in mind that too big is better than too small! Bigger pieces will give out juicer chicken bits!

-Cut upper and lower leg meats strips into 25 mm/inch square pieces.
You may make the lowe leg meat pieces comparatively smaller as they take more time to cook.

-Insert skewers/sticks fromthe “meat end”.
Start from the smaller bits. Stab one lower leg meat piece first and then one upper leg meat piece. Repeat the same sequence.

-Leave plenty of space at the “handle” portion for better handling during the grilling.
Having an upper leg meat piece at the end will make for a greater “bite”!

-Each stick weighs approximately 40 g.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Yakitori Recipes: Tsukune 6

SYNOPSIS:

My friend Island Vittles has decided to start a series on that worldwide known Japanese specialty that is “Yakitori/焼き鳥/”Grilled Chicken”.
I hope that this series of postings on various basic recipes will help her and all other foodies interested in that simple, healthy and so delicious delicacy!

This is a new recipe for Tsukune, the 6th one!

SAUCE/TARE INGREDIENTS:

-Japanese sake: 1 tablespoon
-Japanese sweet sake/mirin: 1 tablespoon
-White wine: 2 tablespoons
-Light soy sauce: 7 tablespoons
-Thick soy sauce (tamari shoyu): 1/2 teaspoon
-Brown sugar: 7 tablespoons
-Black pepper: as appropriate
-Garlic: 3g (grated)

SAUCE/TARE RECIPE:

-In a small pan, pour the japanese sake, Japanese sweet sake/mirin, and white wine. Cook on a low fire to allow the alcohol disappear.

-Add the soy sauce, thick soy sauce, brown sugar, black pepper and garlic.

-Cook over a strong fire. As soon as bubbles appear, switch off fire.

TSUKUNE INGREDIENTS:

-Chicken breast: 218 g (skin included)
-Chicken leg: 206 g (skin included)
-Salt: 2 g
-Sugar: 1/2 teaspoon
-Soy sauce: 2 teaspoons
-Black pepper: as appropriate
-Egg: 1 large
-Large shiso leaves: 2 (finely choppd)
-Sesame oil: 2 teaspoons

RECIPE:

-Take the skin off all chicken. Cut into small enough pieces and heat in microwave for 1 minute. This will enable you to process it as a food processor cannot work with raw chicken skin. The skin has to go into the recipe for greater taste!

-Frirst drop the skins into the food processor and turn until skin has been cut into fine pieces.
-Drop in the breast meat cut into pieces and turn until the meat turns white.
-Finally drop in the leg meat cut into pieces and turn.

-This is how it should look once processed.
-Transfer the whole minced chicken into a bowl.
-Add the salt, sugar, soy sauce, black pepper, egg, shiso leaves, sesame oil and mix well.

Taht is how it should look before you shape the tsukune!

-As the tsukune/patties will be toosoft to skewer, first fry them in a non-stick pan to ensure their outside is solid enough before you pass skewers through them!

-Grill them over a low fire.
Dip (or baste with) the tuskune in sauce/tare at least three times halfway. Everytime turn them over as one side has become dry.

-Serve!
I like them served with a fresh egg yolk for further seasoning!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Yakitori Recipes: Tsukune 1~5

SYNOPSIS:

My friend Island Vittles has decided to start a series on that worldwide known Japanese specialty that is “Yakitori/焼き鳥/”Grilled Chicken”.
I hope that this series of postings on various basic recipes will help her and all other foodies interested in that simple, healthy and so delicious delicacy!

For the sake of continuity, I also decided to re-post the Tsukune Recipes I have published so far for all to refer to before I start publishing new ones.

1) Basic recipe

TSUKUNE-RECIPES-1

Apparently, yakitori and especially tsukune are very popular not only in Japan but almost everywhere in the world as they share similarities with many other countries’ specialties! After all a hamburger is nothing less than a big tsukune!LOL

Here is the first of (long) series of simple recipes that I hope will stimulate into you creating more recipes!

Tsukune Recipe 1:

INGREDIENTS: For 4 people

-High quality chicken (breast or thigh): 250 g
-Leek (long narrow one): 1
-Soy sauce + Japanese sake + mirin/sweet sake: 4 tablespoons each
-Honey: 2 teaspoons
-Fresh ginger juice (also available over the counter in Asian stores): 10 ml
-Water: 2 tablespoons
-Cornstarch: 2 tablespoons
-Salad oil: 2 tablespoons

RECIPE:

-Cut chicken and leek into rough pieces and drop them into a food processor. Add one half of the cornstarch, water, soy sauce, sake and mirin each.

-Process well until you obtain a smooth paste. Stop the food processor from time to time to move chicken from the centre with a spatula.

-Make/shape “patties”/tsukune.
Fry in oil on a frypan over a low fire on both side until you obtain a light brown colour (“foxy” in Japanese)

-Pour the rest of the soy sauce, sake, mirin, ginger juice, and cornstarch dissolved in water over the tsukune and cook until the sauce has caramelized.
Serve immediately!

NOTE:
By dividing the seasoning in two halves, the chicken will be thoroughly impregnated with the taste.
make sure you cook over a low fire all the time!
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2) Basic Recipe

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Here is the second of (long) series of simple recipes that I hope will stimulate into you creating more recipes!

INGREDIENTS:
-Minced Chicken: 400 g+
-Large shiso/perilla leaves (can be replaced with basil or other green tasty leaves): 15~20
-Salt, pepper: 1 pinc each
-Black sesame: 1 teaspoon
-Grated fresh ginger: 5×5 cm cube
-Japanese Sake: 1 teaspoon
-Cornstarch: 1 tablespoon
-Egg yolk: 1 large

-For seasoning:
Lemon juice
Yuzu koshio/lime and pepper paste

RECIPE:

TSUKUNE-RECIPES-2-b

-Chop the leaves fine as shown on above picture.

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-In a large bowl, drop in the minced chicken, salt, pepper and black sesame seeds. Mix well until it becomes a smooth paste.

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-Add egg yolk, Japanese Sake, Cornstarch and grated ginger.
Mix well.

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-Add chopped shiso (leaves) and mix well.

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-make tsukune/patties in size of your liking around a wooden stick.

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-Pour a little oil in a non-stick frypan and place tsukune as shown on picture.
Start frying.

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-When one side has reached the right colour, turn over and fry until both sides have reached the proper colour.
You may add a little more Japanese sake for seasoning.

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-Cover with large piece of foil paper and stema/fry on a small fire for a while.

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-That’s how the should look when ready!

-Serve a little lemon juice and lime and peppr paste, and plenty of beer!

NOTE:
Naturally, youi may use a sauce of your choice as well, or ponzu, or soy sauce, etc.
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3) Tofu Tsukune

TSUKUNE-TOFU

Here is the third of (long) series of simple recipes that I hope will stimulate into you creating more recipes!
The difference is that this time it is made with tofu as well!

INGREDIENTS: For 2~3 persons

-Tofu: 100 g
-Minced chicen: 300 g
-Onion, finely chopped, 1/2
-Grated fresh ginger, 3~3cm cube
-Egg: 1
-Black pepper: a pinch or two
-Cornstarch: 2 teaspoons
-Soy sauce: 2 tablespoons
-Japanese sake: 2 tablepoons
-Sugar: 2+1/2 tablespoons
-Salad oil

RECIPE:

-In a bowl mix tofu, chicken, onion, ginger, egg, pepper and cornstarch. Make patties/tsukune.

-Pour some oil in a frypan. On medium high fire fry both sides of tsukune until they have reached a nice colour. Add some water. Cover with lid and steam/cook on low fire.

-Mix soy sauce, Japanese sake and sugar in a bowl.

-Take off lid from tsukune. Turn to medium fire. Pour in the sauce and simmer until ready for serving.

NOTE:

Great served wrapped in shiso leaves!
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4) Large Tsukune

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Here is the fourth of (long) series of simple recipes that I hope will stimulate into you creating more recipes!

INGREDIENTS: For 3~4 persons

-Minced Chicken (breast or thigh): 250 g
-Leek, lon and thin type: 1
-Fresh ginger, grated, to taste
-Soy sauce: 1 tablespoon
-Salt and pepper: a little to taste
-Cornstarch: 1 tablespoon
-Sesame oil: a little to taste
-Yama Imo/Japanese glutinous yam, grated: 2 tablespoons

Tare/Sauce
-Soy sauce: 2 tablespoons
-Mirin/sweet sake: 2 tablespoons
-Water: 1 teaspoon
-Seven spices, to taste

Decoration/presentation:

-Kaiwaredaikon/Daikon sprouts: to taste
-White sesame seeds: to taste
-Grated fresh daikon: to taste

RECIPE:

-Chop leek finely. Grate the ginger. Grate the yama imo.

-In a large bowl drop the the minced chicken, soy sauce, salt & pepper, seame oil and mix quickly by hand.

-Add leek, ginger, yama imo and the cornstarch. Mix well. Let the mixture rest in the fridge for 30 minutes.

-During that time prepare the kaiwaredaikon, freshly grated daikon and sesame sesame seeds.
Prepare the tare/sauce ingredients.

-Fry the tsukune/patties after having shaped them into 3 or 4 equal sized circles with salad oil on both sides over a medium fire until they are a light brown.

-Add 2 tablespoons of water, cover with lid and steam/simmer for a while. Check if tsukune are well cooked with a thin wooden stick.

-Add the tare/sauce ingredients and cook until the tare has “caramelized”.
Serve on a plate with kaiware daikon, grated fresh daikon and white seasme seeds for the final touch.

NOTE:
Do not fry tsukune over a strong fire or they will get hard.
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5) PORK TSUKUNE

TSUKUNE-PORK

Here is the fourth of (long) series of simple recipes that I hope will stimulate into you creating more recipes!

INGREDIENTS: For 2 persons

-Minced pork: 200 g
-Thin green leeks: 4~5
-Ginger, grated: 1 piece, 5×5 cm
-Japanese sake: 2 tablespoons
-Soy sauce: 3 tablespoons
-Naga imo/glutinous Japanese yam/Chinese yam, grated: 2 tablespoons
-Cornstarch: 1 tablespoon

Tare/Sauce
-Soy sauce: 2~3 tablespoons
-Sugar: 2 teaspoons
-Mirin/sweet sake: 3 tablespoons

-Japanese sake: 2 tablespoons (for steam/fry)
-Onsen Tamago/Japanese-style poached eggs (normal poached eggs are great!)

RECIPE:

-Chop the thin leeks coarsely.
In a bowl mix minced pork, Japanese sake, soy sauce and grated ginger until smooth.

-Add grated Chinese yam and mix until smooth. It will take some time as the yam will tend to separate at first. Add cornstarch and mix until smooth.

-Add chopped leeks and mix well.

-Heat a frypan. Pour in a little oil. Make 6~7 round patties/tsukune by hand or with a mold.
Fry both sides on a medium fire.

-When “eyes” have appeared on both sides, reduce fire to small. Add sake, cover with glass lid and steam fry.

-When you are sure that the tsukune are well cooked, add soy sauce, mirin and sugar and let simmer until sauce has “caramelized” the tsukune.

-Serve with a poached egg in a separate ramequin for each person who will choose either to break it directly over the tsukune or use it as a dip (the former will be probably easier!LOL)

NOTE:
-You can increase the amount of leeks and gingeraccording to your taste.
-You may replace leeks with parsley.
-Any soy sauce is fine, although a sweet variety is recommended. Otherwise you may increase the amount of mirin.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles

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Yakitori: Tsukune-The Basics

TSUKUNE-5
Modern tsukune at Japanese Izakaya

SYNOPSIS:

My friend Island Vittles has decided to start a series on that worldwide known Japanese specialty that is “Yakitori/焼き鳥/”Grilled Chicken”.
I hope that this series of postings on various basic recipes will help her and all other foodies interested in that simple, healthy and so delicious delicacy!

For the sake of continuity, I also decided to re-post Tsukune-The Basics for all to refer to.

Yakitori is not only all parts of a chicken (or other bird, actually) on sticks or skewers.
One very popular yakitori is “Tsukune”!
Tsukune (つくね) could described as a japanese chicken meatball either on stick or completely separate.

Whereas usual yakitori requires fine products and sauce (and a cooking skills) only, tsukune calls for a real recipe.

TSUKUNE-2
Traditional tsukune serves with egg yolk and chopped leeks.

Traditional tsukune are presented as a single larger sausage-shaped “ball” grilled around a skewer and will be served with some sauce and an egg yolk (either chicken or quail). A good amount of chopped leeks is always welcome.

TSUKUNE-4

Home-made tsukune will be simpler and served as chicken meat balls with home-made or bought tare/sauce.

TSUKUNE-3

Modern tsukune seem come in many varieties all on the same plate. Actually the toppings are different but the meat balls are the same.

TSUKUNE-1

They certainly look appetizing!
Thay are fine, but as a purist I still prefer the traitional ones!

Next, I will publish a recipe!
You will find out there more ingredients included than in simple chicken balls!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Yakitori Recipes: The Basics

YAKITORI-1

SYNOPSIS:

My friend Island Vittles has decided to start a series on that worldwide known Japanese specialty that is “Yakitori/焼き鳥/”Grilled Chicken”.
I hope that this series of postings on various basic recipes will help her and all other foodies interested in that simple, healthy and so delicious delicacy!

For the sake of continuity, I decided to re-post The Basics for all to refer to.

Yakitori (焼き鳥 やきとり), or fried chicken, is a Japanese type of skewered chicken that is found everywhere in Japan and i many countries abroad.
They are served all year round and have the advantage not only to be tasty but very healthy as meat comes by.

It is made from several bite-sized pieces of chicken meat, or chicken offal, skewered on a bamboo skewer and barbecued, usually over charcoal.

Diners ordering yakitori usually have a choice of having it served with salt (and sometimes lemon juice) or with tare sauce, which is generally made up of mirin, sake, soy sauce and sugar. The sauce is applied to the skewered meat and is grilled until delicately cooked and is served with the tare sauce as a dip.

Ways of serving naturally vary with regions.

YAKITORI-MURORAN

As served in Mururoran, Hokkaido.

YAKITORI-EHIME

As served in Ehime Prefecture, Shikoku Island.

One can order for sets or individually.
In the later case, you would do weel to remember basic names:

YAKITORI-HATSU
hatsu (ハツ) or kokoro (こころ), chicken heart

YAKITORI-LIVER
rebā (レバー), liver

YAKITORI-SUNAGIMO
sunagimo (砂肝), or zuri (ずり) chicken gizzard

YAKITORI-TSUKUNE
tsukune (つくね), chicken meatballs
Great served with an egg yolk and tare!

YAKITORI-KAWA
(tori)kawa ((とり)かわ) chicken skin, grilled until crispy

YAKITORI-TABASAKI
tebasaki (手羽先), chicken wing
The same can be ordered whole.

YAKITORI-BONCHIRI
bonjiri (ぼんじり), chicken tail

YAKITORI-SHIRO
shiro (シロ), chicken small intestines

YAKITORI-NEGIMA
ikada (筏) (lit. raft), Japanese scallion, with two skewers to prevent rotation. Also called negima (ネギ間)

YAKITORI-AOTO
Aoto (青と). Here the leek/scallion is rolled insde the chicken

YAKITORI-KASHIRA
Kashira (かしら) made from the tender par of the breast.

YAKITORI-SESERI
Seseri (せせり) similar to kashira

nankotsu, chicken cartilage
toriniku, Free Range “Chicken of the Earth” (all white meat on skewer)

Common kushiyaki (non-poultry) dishes:

atsuage tofu (厚揚げとうふ, deep-fried tofu)
enoki maki (エノキ巻き, enoki mushrooms wrapped in slices of pork)
pīman (ピーマン, green pepper)
asuparabēkon (アスパラベーコン, asparagus wrapped in bacon)

YAKITORI-BUTABARA
butabara (豚ばら, pork belly)

gyutan (牛タン), ox tongue, sliced thinly

Naturally if you take purely regional specialties in account, there are many more!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Yakitori Recipes: Sauce/Tare 1~3

SYNOPSIS:

My friend Island Vittles has decided to start a series on that worldwide known Japanese specialty that is “Yakitori/焼き鳥/”Grilled Chicken”.
I hope that this series of postings on various basic recipes will help her and all other foodies interested in that simple, healthy and so delicious delicacy!

I’ve already introduced two recipes for Sasami, but I thought it was time I introduced a few easy recipes for “tare” or sauce in Japanese, before I embarked on a long article on cutting techniques to appear soon!

YAKITORI TARE 1:

INGREDIENTS:

-Soy sauce: 130 cc/ml
-Japanese sake: 100 cc/ml
-Sweet Japanese sake/mirin: 100 cc/ml

-Mizuame: 50 g (if unavailable, use corn syrup)

Mizuame (水飴) is a sweetener from Japan which is translated literally to ‘water candy’. A clear, thick, sticky liquid, it is made by converting starch to sugars. Mizuame is added to wagashi to give them a sheen, eaten in ways similar to honey and can be a main ingredient in sweets. Mizuame is produced in a very similar fashion to corn syrup and is very similar in taste.

-Sugar: 30 g
-Garlic: 1 clove (chopped)
-Fresh ginger: 5x5cm piece (Thinly sliced)

RECIPE:

-In a bowl pour the Japanese sake and mirin/sweet Japanese sake and heat to suppress the alcohol.

-Add soy sauce, mizuame (corn syrup), sugar, garlic and ginger and simmer until the mixture “glows”.

-Take the garlic and ginger out. Preserve in a securely closed jar in the fridge.

YAKITORI TARE 2

INGREDIENTS:

-Soy sauce: 50~60 cc/ml
-Sweet Japanese sake/mirin: 50 cc/ml
-Japanese sake: 50 cc/ml
-Sugar: 1 tablespoon

RECIPE:

-Pour everything into a pan and cook over medium fire until reduced to half.

-If you want to preserve it in a securely closed jar in the fridge, better prepare 2~ 4 fold!

YAKITORI TARE 3

INGREDIENTS:

-Japanese sake: 1 tablespoon
-Japanese sweet sake/mirin: 1 tablespoon
-White wine: 2 tablespoons
-Light soy sauce: 7 tablespoons
-Thick soy sauce (tamari shoyu): 1/2 teaspoon
-Brown sugar: 7 tablespoons
-Black pepper: as appropriate
-Garlic: 3g (grated)

RECIPE:

-In a small pan, pour the japanese sake, Japanese sweet sake/mirin, and white wine. Cook on a low fire to allow the alcohol disappear.

-Add the soy sauce, thick soy sauce, brown sugar, black pepper and garlic.

-Cook over a strong fire. As soon as bubbles appear, switch off fire.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Yakitori Recipes: Sasami 2

SYNOPSIS:

My friend Island Vittles has decided to start a series on that worldwide known Japanese specialty that is “Yakitori/焼き鳥/”Grilled Chicken”.
I hope that this series of postings on various basic recipes will help her and all other foodies interested in that simple, healthy and so delicious delicacy!

This is the second Recipe: Yakitori Sasami 2:

“Sasami/ささ身 or 笹身” may be roughly translated as “white light chicken meat”. It is found in the breast (see picture above) and is considered the most tender part of the chicken.

“Sasami” as sold in Japanese supermarkets.

Yakitori Sasami with Shiso & Umeboshi:

INGREDIENTS: For 3 persons

-Chicken sasami: 300 g
-Umeboshi: as appropriate
-Shiso/perilla leaves: 4
-Salt and pepper: as appropriate

RECIPE:

-Cut the sasami into bite-sized chunks and salt lightly.

-Fry the chicken chunks in a non-stick pan over a medium fire.

-Once the the chicken is cooked (do not overcook it! No “black spots”) should appear!), align them on skewers.
Mince the umeboshi flesh with a knife and paste it along the Top.
Chop the shiso leaves finely and decorate as shown on top picture.

-makes for an easy, cheap and elegant snack!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Yakitori Recipes: Sasami 1

My friend Island Vittles has decided to start a series on that worldwide known Japanese specialty that is “Yakitori/焼き鳥/”Grilled Chicken”.
I hope that this series of postings on various basic recipes will help her and all other foodies interested in that simple, healthy and so delicious delicacy!

“Sasami/ささ身 or 笹身” may be roughly translated as “white light chicken meat”. It is found in the breast (see picture above) and is considered the most tender part of the chicken.

“Sasami” as sold in Japanese supermarkets.

SASAMI RECIPES 1: Soft sasami on skewers

INGREDIENTS: For 10 sticks

-Chicken Sasami: 400 g (or 10 sasami)
-Skewers: 10
-Japanese sake: as appropriate
-Chicken soup stock (powder): 1/2 tablespoon (best is Chinese chicken bones soup stock powder)
-Sesame oil: as appropriate

RECIPE:

-Cut each sasami into 4~6 pieces for each skewer.
Drop all the cut chicken in a bowl and add just enough sake for seasoning/marinating. Add chicken soup stock powder and mix well by hand.
Let marinate for 30 minutes.

Drain chicken (throw away the “juices) with a sieve or “Zaru” (Japanese bamboo sieve). Transfer into clean bowl and add enough sesame oil to season the whole. Stir with hand for even seasoning.

-Skewer the sasami pieces.

-Grill both sides.
Don’t overgrill. No “black spots” should appear.

-Serve.
Best served with real wasabi.
You may of course serve them with a little salt, or pepper or whatever you fancy.
Have lettuce handy for a great and simple combination.
For foodies of all ages!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento. Island Vittles

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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日本語のブログ
—————————————-