Tag Archives: 豚カツ

Tonkatsu Recipes 2: Katsudon

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Katsudon is the favorite dish of famous Japanese baseball players such as the Yankees’ Hideki Matsui. In hard-boiled Japanese films, it is a dish served to villains under police interrogation!

If you have grasped the recipe for tonkatsu and oyakodon, it is pretty easy to make.

Here is a variation very popular in Japanese homesteads:

INGREDIENTS: For 4 people

-Tonkatsu:
Pork cuts: 4
Black pepper: to taste
Flour: 2~3 tablespoons
Egg: 1
Breadcrumbs/Panko: 1~2 cups
Frying oil

-Soup Stock:
Sugar: 1 tablespoon
Jaoanese sake: 50 ml
Sweet sake/Mirin: 50 ml
Soy sauce: 50 ml
Dashi (or soup stock): 100 ml

-Others:
Onion: 1 large
Sesame oil: 1 tablespoon
Steamed rice: enough for 4 servings
Eggs: 4~5
Trefoil or other leaf vegetables (including thin leeks,…): chopped, to taste
Dry seaweed/Nori: Finely cut, to taste

RECIPE:

KATSUDON-RECIPE-1

Make shallow cuts every 3~4 cm along the rim of the pork cuts (to prevent thme from bending or contracting). Sprinkle with black pepper, Roll in flour, then egg and last in breadcrumbs like in normal tonkatsu recipe.

KATSUDON-RECIPE-2

Deep-fry at 170~180 degrees Celsius.
Fry until breadcrumbs have become solid. Only then you may manipulate the tonkarsu and turn it over inside the oil.
Once cooked, cut it in serving size slices when still hot.

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Cut the onion in half first, then into about 5 mm thick slices. Fry in sesame oil until they become translucent.
During that time, pour sake and mirin in a small pan and bring to boil. Add sugar, soy sauce and dashi. Bring to boil.

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Pour soup on onion and bring to boil.
Drop in allthe cut tonkatsu and cook for a couple of minutes.

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Lower fire a little so that the soup does not boil. Pour the eggs well-beaten and add trefoil. Cover and cook on a medium fire for about a minute.
Eggs should be cooked on top but still half-cooked under. Make sure the eggs fill the spaces betwen the pork cuts.

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Fill each bowl with steamed rice and cover each with tonkatsu and omelette. Pour the left over soup over the top. Add dry seaweed on top and serve!

OTHER KATSUDON SAMPLES:

TONKATSU-KATSUDON-1

TONKATSU-KATSUDON-2

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Tonkatsu Recipes 1: Basic Recipe

TONKATSU-PH

Tonkatsu, if properly organized, is not difficult to cook or prepare.
Here is the first of a series of recipes you easily accomodate to your taste and preferences:

Tonkatsu Basic Recipe:

INGREDIENTS: For one person

-Pork cutlet: one large, 1~2 cm thick. Choose good quality with as little fat as possible, although some around the rim is welcome.
-Flour: 2 tablespoons
-Black pepper: to taste:
-Salt: to taste
-Nutmeg: a pinch (you may use other spices of course, including chili pepper!)
-Egg: 1 large
-Fresh breadcrumbs (if unavailable, use dry breadcrumbs or panko): half a cup
-Deep-fry oil (as fresh as possible!)
-Cabbage (as much as you want, finley shredded)
-Sesame powder/ground sesame seeds: 1 tablespoon
-Tonkatsu sauce: 2 large tablespoons (easily found in markets. You can of course make your own with worcestershire sauce, ketchup, mustard and so on!)

RECIPE:

TONKATSU-RECIPE-1

-Make a shallow incision across the rim every 3~4 cm. It is an important step as it will prevent the meat from contracting or bending!

TONKATSU-RECIPE-2

-In a bowl mix flour, pepper, salt and spices. One can add curry mix powder there, too!

TONKATSU-RECIPE-3

-Cover both side of the pork cut with the flour mixture. Take care not to form lumps of flour.
Trick: Try to use only one hand to come in contact with the food, while the other hand stays dry and can manipulate utensils!

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-In a different bowl beat the egg. Preferably do this ahead of everything.
Dip the floured pork cut into the beaten egg.

TONKATSU-RECIPE-5

-Pour the breadcrumbs on a plate and spread it evenly. Thisis also better done before you start anything!
Lay the pork cut on the breadcrumbs and gently press. Cover the top side with breadcrumbs, too and pat gently to help the breadcrumbs adhere. Don’t be afraid of coating with a lot of breadcrumbs!

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-Heta the oil to 170 degrees Celsius. Drop a little breadcrumb in the oil to check if it’s hot enough. It should start frying with bubbles right away. Drop the pork cut gently into the oil to avoid any accident.

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-Turn the pork cut over for even frying as it will rise to the surface. Do it as gently as possible either with long wooden chopsticks of frying tongs.

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-On a serving plate lay a bed of shredded cabbage decorated with a little parsley and a few lemon slices. Provide some strong mustard if wanted.
Take pork cut out of the oil and lay on a grill for a few seconds to take off excess oil. Transfer onto a working table and cut into strips.
Place it above or beside shredded cabbage in the right order so as to remind you of the original shape.

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Japanese Cuisine: Tonkatsu-The Basics

TONKATSU-1

Tonkatsu (豚カツ, とんかつ, or トンカツ, pork cutlet), invented in the late 19th century, is a popular dish in Japan. It consists of a breaded (breadcrums/panko), pork cutlet one to two centimeters thick first deep-fried whole then sliced into bite-sized pieces, generally served with shredded cabbage and/or miso soup. Either a pork fillet (ヒレ, hire) or pork loin (ロース, rōsu) cut may be used; the meat is usually salted, peppered and dipped in a mixture of flour, beaten egg and panko (Japanese breadcrumbs) before being deep fried.

TONKATSU-HIREKATSU
Hire Katsu or high quality pork fillet served and cut into one bite size.

It was originally considered a type of yōshoku/洋食—Japanese versions of European schnitzel invented in the late 1800s and early 1900s—and was called katsu-retto (“cutlet”) or simply katsu. Early katsu-retsu was usually beef; the pork version, similar to today’s tonkatsu, is said to have been first served in 1890 in a western food restaurant in Ginza, Tokyo. The term “tonkatsu” (“pork katsu”) was coined in the 1930s.

In Korea, this dish is known as donkkaseu (돈까스), a simple transliteration of the Japanese word to Korean.

TONKATSU-KATSUSANDO
“Katsu sando/Tonkatsu Sandwich” as served in Okinawa

Variations
Tonkatsu has Japanized over the years more so than other yōshoku and is today usually served with rice, miso soup and tsukemono/pickles in the style of washoku/和食 (traditional Japanese food) and eaten with chopsticks. Recently, some establishments have taken to serving tonkatsu with the more traditional Japanese grated daikon and ponzu instead of tonkatsu sauce.

TONKATSU-KATSUDON
Katsudon

Tonkatsu is also popular as a sandwich filling (katsu sando) or served on Japanese curry (katsu karē). It is sometimes served with egg on a big bowl of rice as katsudon—an informal one-bowl lunchtime dish.

Regardless of presentation, tonkatsu is most commonly eaten with a type of thick Japanese Worcestershire sauce that uses pureed apples as a principal ingredient and is called tonkatsu sauce (tonkatsu sōsu) (トンカツソース), often simply known as sōsu (“sauce”), and often with a bit of spicy yellow karashi (Japanese mustard) and perhaps a slice of lemon. Some people like to use soy sauce instead. In Nagoya and surrounding areas, miso katsu—tonkatsu eaten with a miso-based sauce—is a specialty.

Variations on tonkatsu may be made by sandwiching an ingredient like cheese or shiso leaf between the meat, and then breading and frying. For the calorie conscious, konnyaku is sometimes sandwiched between the meat. And in Waseda, Tokyo, a restaurant serves a tonkatsu with a bar of chocolate sandwiched inside, sometimes compared to a Western creation: the deep-fried Mars Bar.

There are several variations to tonkatsu that use alternatives to pork:

Chicken katsu (チキンカツ) is a similar dish, using chicken instead of pork. This variant often appears in Hawaiian plate lunches.
Menchi katsu is a minced meat patty, breaded and deep fried.
Hamu katsu (ハムカツ “ham katsu”), a similar dish made from ham, is usually considered a budget alternative to tonkatsu.
Gyū katsu (牛カツ “beef katsu”), also known as bīfu katsu, is popular in the Kansai region around Osaka and Kobe.
Saengseonkkaseu (생선까스 “fish katsu”) is a Korean fish-cutlet modelled on the Japanese fry[citation needed].
Prices for a tonkatsu vary from 198 yen for a pre-cooked tonkatsu from a supermarket to over 5,000 yen in an expensive restaurant. The finest tonkatsu is said[citation needed] to be made from kurobuta (black pig) from Kagoshima Prefecture in southern Japan

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