Tag Archives: Fish

Eel/Unagi: Mishima City Unagiya Association vote against using wild eels!


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(Shizuoka Shinbun, July 1st, 2008)

In an unprecedented move (apparently a first in whole Japan), the Mishima City Eel Restaurants/Unagiya Association has voted against serving wild eels, especially the variety known as “shirasu unagi”, to preserve and increase the present stocks which have fallen to an alarming all-time low.
Mishima City is celebrated all over the country as the “eel city” where you can eat the delicacy in all known forms.
Until now, the restaurants would have even accepted to prepare wild eels caught and brought by customers. As the decision has come into force the moment it was voted, do not expect anyone to break the rules!

This is a similar move to the self-imposed quotas decided by the Yui Sakura Shrimps Fishermen Association which led to increased stocks for the benefit of all.

Who said Japan is bent on fishing the oceans dry?

Japanese Foie gras: Ankimo and its preparation


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frogfish.jpg

“Ankimo” is the liver of the Frogfish (“anko”), a fish that can be found in most the Northern Hemisphere and elsewhere. Not a nicelooking fish, it is nonetheless appreciated almost everywhere.
The Japanese love it in “nabe” (Japanese-style fish pot au feu), while the French either introduce it in Bouillabaisse, or even better, baked rooled inside prime bacon.

The liver is much appreciated in some countries, especially France and Scandinavia.
In Japan they steam it in sake to make “ankimo”, which I usually introduce to neophytes as “Japanese fish foie gras”!

Pic taken at Yumeshin, Shizuoka City.
I asked for it served (it is a cold appetizer) as it is as “tsumami” (hors d’oeuvre) with “ponzu shoyu”, finely chopped thin leeks and a dash of “Momiji-oroshi” (grated daikon and chili pepper) on a shiso leaf.
It is also great in small pieces on a gunkan topped with the same as above!

As I have been asked again, here is the recipe for making “Ankimo”!
Note that sake can be replaced white wine.

Step 1:

Choose fresh ankimo. That is how it should look!

Step 2:

Take off blood vessels. Don’t worry about the nerves.

Step 3:

After taking blood vessels away it does not look pretty. Nothing to worry about actually!

Step 4:

Lightly salt all sides

Step 5:

Wrap it in cooking wrap and let rest for an hour.

Step 6:

That is how it will look after an hour.

Step 7:

Take off all water and salt with kitchen paper.
Get the teamer ready.

Step 8:

As in the picture place wrap on bamboo roll maker (use a soft plastic sheet if not available). Place the frogfish liver on third of the way as equally as possible.

Step 9:

Roll in carefully, making sure the wrap sheet does not accidentally penetrate the liver.

Step 10:

Twist both ends of the wrap sheet until there is no space left inside.

Step 11:

Cut extremities of the wrap making sure the roll does not unfold and wrap it inside another sheet.

Step 12:

Wrap inside cooking aluminum foil.

Step 13:

Twist ends to close.

Step 14-15-16:

-Put inside steamer and close.
-Cook for 30 minutes above strong heat
-Take off and let cool

Step 17:

For better consistency leave in refrigerator for a full day. Cut slices to your preferred thickness.

Step 18:

(For example) serve astride sliced cucumber, sprinkle it with a generous amount of ponzu shoyu and place half a spoon of “momiji oroshi” (grated daikon seasoned with chili pepper). Finely chopped thin leeks or shiso would make a nice finishing touch, too!

Sashimi Set at Tomii


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Was in a bit of a hurry today during my “dinner break”, but was still hungry enough to visit Tomii in Shizuoka City. Chuckeats and Very Good Food are going to wonder what such dinners consist of! LOL.
Tomii, my favourite Japanese cuisine restaurant in this Prefecture, never disappoints you, your being a gastronome or an artist. The only problem is that pictures are no easy task with a mobile phone!
Here is what I was served when I asked for “Sashimi Moriawase/Sashimi Set”:
From left to right:
Aka Ika/Red Squid, Hirame/Sole, Akami/Lean Maguro, Madai/”True” Seabream.
It was served with soy sauce for the fish and miso for the vegetables, which included Take No Ko/Bamboo Shoots from Oshika, Shizuoka City.

TOMII
Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Tokiwa-cho, 1-2-7, Tomii Bldg, 1F
Tel.: 054-274-0666
Business hours: 17:00~22:00
Closed on Sundays

KUE: Fish Stocks Replenishing Success Story


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(Courtesy of Shizuoka Shinbun, Feb 7th, 2008)

For all the battering and criticism that Japan has to endure for being the largest consumer of fish in the World (which is not. Spain is the largest fish single-country consumer, and Europe eats 40% of the World total catch, and throws away more than 5 times the same amount of dead fish back into the sea.), it is way ahead of eveyone else when it comes to preserving and repleneshing fish stocks.

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I’m proud to say that Shizuoka Prefecture happens to be the most active region in this country in that particular field. I’d certainly love to take some “people” to the Tokai Marine University Research Laboratories in Shimizu Ku, Shizuoka City! Did you know that Shizuoka Prefecture alone produces half of dried fish in Japan, including the most expensive such as “kinmeidai”, which can easily fetch over 50 US$ a piece, depending on the weight?

New Yorkers (Courtesy of Chuckeats.com) and Gastronomes all over the world, rejoice!
For the first time ever in Japan, “Kue” (Kelp Bass, Kelp Grouper, Saladfish, Epinephelus bruneus Bloch), a fish costing more than 10,000 yen (100 US $) per kilog, has been successfully bred in Omaezaki, in Western Shizuoka Prefecture!

Yesterday Governor Ishikawa (lucky one!) was offered kue sashimi and nabe yesterday by the Kue Promotion Association in Omaezaki (see pic above). About time permanent expats were allowed to run for local offices!