Tag Archives: キャベツ

Vegan Treats at Yasaitei

Once I explained the notion of “Jooren” or “regular customer” in Japan.
Whereas in many other countries patronizing the same establishment on a regular basis might be considered at best as an ostentatious show, and a disreputable habit at worst, eating and drinking out in Japan is a sine qua non prerequisite to a successful life, both professional and social. Therefore it always is a good idea to ptronize a few etablishments even if it is for a quick drink or snack.
It also makes conversation so much easier and the visits more welcome as it provides a pleasant break from the usual coded life of the Japanese.

good Japanese chefs will always tackle the challenge to satisfy culinary priorities, including vegetarianism and veganism. After all, most omnivores’ food is over 80% vegetarian. Don’t be afraid to ask for precise explanations of your food!

This “o-toshi”/snack served with first drink consists of komatsuna/Japanese Mustard Spinach, enoki mushrooms, mitsuba/trefoil and nameko mushrooms prepared in o-hitashi style/slightly boiled and cooled down before being served in their own juices.

As for drinks, do not worry as Japanese sake and shochu are vegan.
This particular shochu is a bit extravagant. It was distilled by Takashima Brewery in Numazu City, Shizuoka, from the white lees of supelative sake before being matured for a couple of years in sherry barrels imported from Sapin!
Tastes like a soft flowery whisky!

vegerables are plentuful in Japan, and especially in Shizuoka.
They make for beautiful presentation with a minimum of care and improvisation.
Back home, first choose a nice tray to present to your friend or family!
The concept is almost like a flower arrangement!

The best “sauce” for such a vegan sashimi is a mixture (according to your preferences) of sesame oil, sea salt and dark miso!

Wherever you are, I’m sure you will find plenty of vegetables to work with:
In our case,we have form the left: Myoga ginger sprouts, Ice plant, Ameera/very sweet tomato and young ginger roots. It is the season for the laterr and they are so tender that they make a very tasty, crucnhy, raw treat!

Daikon (choose the upper part, as the pointed end is a bit too strong!) on a leaf of shiso/perilla and thinly sliced Spring onions from Shizuoka, radish, kiirokyo ninjin/Yellow Kyoto carrot and those crunchy Japanese cucumbers!

A “side view” to help you understand the presentation!

And another one from the other end!

I sincerely hope this will have given you a few ideas!

YASAITEI
Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Tokiwa-Cho, 1-6-2 Green Heights Wamon 1-C
Tel.: 054-2543277
Business hours: 17:30~22:00
Closed on Sundays
Reservations highly recommended
Seating: 6 at counter + 20 at tables
Set Courses: 3,000, 4,000, 5,000 yen
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless Mama, Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice, The French Market Maven

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Vegan Sashimi at Yasaitei (again!/10-02-15)

How many times have I written about Yasaitei? LOl
And I don’t think I will ever tire of it! Well, if it can help my vegan and vegetarian friends, so much the better. As an omnivore I feel the urge to lend a hand and help them enjoy life in this great country.
I’m actually preparing an article on vegan life in Japan for later in the day to as much information as possible into one posting.

Before I describe the vegan sashimi plate, let me introduce what came with my glass of shochu (vegan alcoholic drink, by the way): mozuku.
Mozuku/モズク is Nemacystus decipiens in Latin.
It is a seaweed that is collected in many areas of Japan and the two main varieties are Okinawa Mozuku/オキナワモズク Cladosiphon okamuranus (Latin) and Ishi Mozuku/Rock Mozukuイシモズク Sphaerotrichia divaricata (Latin). They are usually served in amazu/甘酢/sweet vinegar. At Yasaitei, they come topped with a few sesame seeds and kawaire daikon sprouts/かわいれ大根.
It almost tastes like a dessert.
I shall also write a long article on seaweed, the vegetable of the oceans later in the day!

Alright, now for the description of the plate:
Ameera (sweet) tomatoes from Western Shizuoka, fat celery stem bottoms, firm and so sweet, my favourite green, ice plant, also crunchy, soft and sweet, myoga ginger hid behind, and Spring cabbage. The latter also has a nice bite, is very soft, almost sweet in taste.

Shiso/perilla leaf on a bed of sliced Winter onion is hidden behind the cabbage. Red radish, crucnhy and very soft, and those Japanese cucumbers, gorged with water under a crunchy skin.

For a “side view” to help you understand the presentation.
Simple and so extravagant at the same time!

YASAITEI
Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Tokiwa-Cho, 1-6-2 Green Heights Wamon 1-C
Tel.: 054-2543277
Business hours: 17:30~22:00
Closed on Sundays
Reservations highly recommended
Seating: 6 at counter + 20 at tables
Set Courses: 3,000, 4,000, 5,000 yen
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless Mama, Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice, The French Market Maven

Please check the new postings at:
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Vegetables Facts & Tips 18: Cabbage

The cabbage is a popular cultivar of the species Brassica oleracea Linne (Capitata Group) of the Family Brassicaceae (or Cruciferae), and is used as a leafy green vegetable. It is a herbaceous, biennial, dicotyledonous flowering plant distinguished by a short stem upon which is crowded a mass of leaves, usually green but in some varieties red or purplish, which while immature form a characteristic compact, globular cluster (cabbagehead).

The plant is also called head cabbage or heading cabbage, and in Scotland a bowkail, from its rounded shape. The Scots call its stalk a castock, and the British occasionally call its head a loaf.

Cabbage leaves often display a delicate, powdery, waxy coating called bloom. The sharp or bitter taste sometimes present in cabbage is due to glucosinolate(s).

The cultivated cabbage is derived from a leafy plant called the wild mustard plant, native to the Mediterranean region, where it is common along the seacoast. Also called sea cabbage and wild cabbage, it was known to the ancient Greeks and Romans. The English name derives from the Normanno-Picard caboche (head), perhaps from boche (swelling, bump).

That for the Wikipedia definition.

FACTS:

-Cabbages are also a good source of riboflavin.
-Cabbages are an excellent source of vitamins A, C, and K. It also contains significant amounts of glutamine, an amino acid which has anti-inflammatory properties.

-It is a source of indole-3-carbinol, or I3C, a compound used as an adjuvant therapy for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, a disease of the head and neck caused by human papillomavirus (usually types 6 and 11) that causes growths in the airway that can lead to death.

-It also contains a marked amount of Calcium, Amino Acids, Potassium and Magnesium.

-The best season from January to May, and June to July.

VARIETIES:

Japan is the World’s No 5 cabbage grower, and so many varieties are available here:

“Haru Kabetsu/Haru Tama” or Spring Cabbage.
Planted in the Fall and harvested in Spring.
The inside is yellow and soft. Can be eaten raw.

“Fuyu Kabetsu/Kantam” or Winter Cabbage.
Planted in Summer and harvested in Winter.
Large number of leaves make it a very dense cabbage.
Great for stews as the shape will hold.

“Kougen Kabetsu” or Plateau Cabbage.
Planted at high altitude in Nagano and Gunma Prefectures in Spring and harvested in Summer and Fall.
Very cold-resistant.

“Petit-Vert”
Very rich in Vitamin C and carotenes, as well as many other nutrients, it is becoming increasingly popular as an organic vegetable both in homes and restaurants. Its small size and tenderness make it easy to use both as decoration and vegetable dish.

“Green Ball”.
Very popular raw in salads or pickled.

“Saboi Kabetsu”/Savoy Cabbage.
Prized for its eleganat looks.
It originated from French Savoie.
Very popular in stews.

“Murasaki kabetsu”/Violet or Red Cabbage.
Not to be confused with the Italian Trevise.
Natural colour.
Very popular raw in salads or pickled.

“Takenoko Kabetsu” or Bamboo Shoot Cabbage.
Popular for its shape. Very soft, great raw in salads.

“Me Kabetsu” or Brussels Sprouts.
Contains 4 times as many Vitamin C as other cabbage varieties.
Very popular in Japanese gastronomy thanks to its small size and taste.

“Kuro Kabstu” or Black Cabbage (Carboronero).
Actually of a very dark green colour.
High in fibers and rich in flavour, popular in stews.

“Keeru Kabetsu” or Kale Cabbage.
High in Vitamin C and carotenes.
Popular as vegetable juice and in stews.

“Afurika Kabetsu”, or African Cabbage.
Also called by its Swahili name, Skumaiki.
has been called the Super Cabbage for its high contents in nutrients.

TIPS:

-To preserve it cut, wrap it tightly in xellophane paper as not to allow any air between the leaves before you stor it in the fridge.

-Choose specimens with thick outer leaves.

-After cutting it. sprinkle with water as it will be easily absorbed by the leaves, amking easier to eat, but do it quickly!

-Choose specimens that feel heavy and tight.

HEALTH FACTS:

-Combined withbasket clams, or cockles, or liver, or vegetal oil, helps combat anemia and ageing, reinforces the digestive system and general health.

-Combined with lemon, or orange, or grapefruit, ortangerines, helps combat artery hardening and stress, helps blood circulation and skin rejuvenatin.

-Combined with spinach, or eel, or carrot, or Chinese chives, helps combat common colds and canacer, promotes virility.

-Combined with Cashew nuts, or vegetal oil, or peanuts, or cod roe, helps combat stress and ageing, and promotes memory.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless Mama, Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice, The French Market Maven, Fuji Mama, Great Teacher Sato, Peas Love Carrots

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Vegan Japanese Cuisine: New Cabbage In Sweet Vinegar Marinade

New cabbages are coming to the markets in Shizuoka!
They are both juicy and crunchy and are just great raw!

Here is a simple recipe for vegans to enjoy:

New Cabbage in Sweet Vinegar Marinade!

INGREDIENTS:

-New Cabbage: 4~5 leaves
-Graound sesame seeds: 2 tablespoons
-Sugar: 1 tablespoon
-Rice vinegar: 1+1/2 tablespoons
-Light taste soy sauce: 1/2 tablespoon

RECIPE:

-Cut the cabbage leaves in 4 cm square pieces.

-Heat salted water in a pan to boiling point.

-Throw in the cabbage.

-Take cabbage out just before boiling point and set aside.

-In a large bowl, mix ll ingredients with cabbage while they are still hot.

-Let it cool down completely.

It can actually be savoured warm, lukearm or chilled, although the quicker you eat it, the better!

Add some leafy greens or sprouts for decoration!

Simple again, ain’t it? (I tend to repeat myself! LOL)

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless Mama, Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice, The French Market Maven

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Non-Mayonnaise Avocado and Soy Beans Coleslaw

AVOCADO-CLOESLAW-1

Here is a simple coleslaw recipe that vegans, vegetarians and omnivores alike can enjoy in Summer:
Non-Mayonnaise Avocado and Soy Beans Coleslaw!

INGREDIENTS: For 4 people
-Cabbage: 4~5 leaves
-Onion: half a large one, shredded, washed in cold water and drained before usage
-Avocado: 1 large
-Lemon Juice (or apple vinegar): 1 large Tablespoon
-Soybeans: 100 g. Boiled in water, cooled and drained (if uanavailable, can be replaced with any kinds of beans or chick peas)
-Salt and Pepper: to taste

RECIPE:
Cut the cabbage in vey thin strips (chopped). Drop into a large bowl. add a little salt. Mix and little while.
As explained above, mince onion, washi in clear cold water and drain thoroughly to take off the onion acidity.

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Once the cabbage has become softer, mix with onion, cut avocado and lemon juice. Mix the whole, crushing/mashing the avocado in at the same time.

Once mixed to you liking, add soy beans and check taste. Rectify if necessary.

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Note: Put chopped onion inside a stocking-style fined netting piece. Keeping it close with your hand, dip it in cold clear water for a while, then take out and press water out. If you do it stongly enough, no need to waste kitchen paper!
Careful about the amount of salt added to the cabbage. Too much and the cabbage will become soggy. If there is too much salt, watch it with clean cold water. The cabbage will taste and feel better if still a little crunchy.
Serve inside a half avocado “skin” (keep some sprinkled with a little lemon juice and securely closed inside a Tuperware box in side the fridge until usage).

Please check the new postings at:
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