Great Pizza after a strollin at La Papi‐ge(ラ パピージェ) 藤枝 蓮華寺/

LA PAPI‐GE

Today I decided it was time to take all my courage to go out for a small walk in Renge -ji, Fujieda.

Renge-ji is is a haven of peace in Fujieda city. Since the last years it got a lot of construction works within its compound : A more wide strolling alley, a shared place for small restaurants owners, more big toboggans !

Well today is not the day for talking about Renge-ji but do not forget to come there in any seasons, you may see cherry blossoms, wisterias, autumn colors and fantastic lotus flowers.

One may take care also about the giant hornets !

LA PAPI‐GE(ラ パピージェ) 藤枝 蓮華寺 is hard to miss, as it has a wide roof dominating the intersection of two roads. The italian(hish) colors may also giving you some clue about its position ! Not so far from the Starbucks, which is also close to the huge parking space for cars.

I didn’t had time to eat slowly in the restaurant, so I choosed the take out option.

I threw myself into two pizzas : The fungi Panna Cotto mais. Do not be surprised I ordered 2 pizzas, as I shared it with my family, the new years holidays did enough damages to my belly to not try to involve it in more unnecessary feast.

The pizza menu

Menu of the day

It should also be noted that in Japan at contrary than in France, where I am from and contrary in a lot of other countries, the japanese pizzas are pretty small. I never went to Italy but it is said that it is more close to what the traditionnal pizza is.

The prices are the following :

1060 yens for the Fongi,

1180 for the Panna Cotto Mais

The Fongi

For this one I was not sure about how much I could get satisfied with it, as it seemed to have few toppings on it. I was impressed by the perfect balance between the oignons, mushrooms and the really tasty tomato sauce.

The pizza dough was thin enough to not steal the taste of all the toppings and each mushroom was crunchy enough to give you the feeling that these few toppings will satisfy your stomach and have a mouth full of ingredients every time.

The Panna Cotto Mais

This one really impressed me by the basil taste reaching instantly once you put it on your taste buds. There was few basil leaves on this one but I could fin out there potential was fully used. A technical feat considering it is the winter season !

The cheese was also tasty and the combination of the basil, oil, and cheese is in the mouth was really fulfilling.

I would suggest to go there and have a cup of red wine to enjoy at its maximum the richness of the aroma of theses pizzas.

Note that I choosed the take out menu so my pizzas where cold. I guess the hot ones are really a treat. I totally recommend this place which is also widely recommended by the local people of shizuoka prefecture.

It warmly recommend as the prices are also under average for this quality of pizzas.

1 Chome-2-19 Nyakuoji, Fujieda, Shizuoka 426-0014 or 〒426-0014 静岡県藤枝市若王子1丁目2−19

Open for lunch and diner !

I suggest to make a booking as the place maybe crowded due to the popularity of the park.

Portraits de Shizuoka #1: Marufuku Seicha /Shizuoka Portraits #1: Marufuku Seicha

Do not forget to activate the subtitles in French/English !

Greetings, everyone!

Here is the first video of our series called “Shizuoka Portraits” conceived with a will to introduce the faces of all those who work hard to make what our Prefecture is

. We endeavored to concentrate our attention more on the “people” than on their art without forgetting to extoll on the latter.

This work being totally amateur and without any financial gains, we hope you will be kind enough to forgive the eventual beginners’ mistakes we are well aware we made in this first edition (sound, background and transitions in particular) which will be corrected in the next episode. This particular video is divided into two distinct parts. The first part is a general enough introduction with a tour of Marufuku Tea factory, and the second one involves more personal points (the conditions, difficulties and personal life of an enterprise lady boss). Do not hesitate to address each part in your preferred order according to your interests.

It is of utmost importance to respect the private life and work of the people we introduce, many of whom are friends/personal acquaintances. If you wish to contact them we would be most grateful that you proceed through us first. We specialize in Shizuoka where we have lived tens of years. The local gastronomy is one of our main focuses.

We invite you to peruse the following sites to follow our reports: https://shizuokagourmet.com/ (French/English) https://saveursdujapon.me/ (French) https://www.facebook.com/Japanecdote/

We kindly remind you that this video is our sole property. We sincerely hope that it will help and please you and we are ready to welcome your comments and reply to them. We believe that because of the Covid 19 it is important to focus on our particular region which has welcomed us along the years but we do not pretend to know all its riches yet and hope you will discover and enjoy them together with us… in front of your screen or one day on site! Our most sincere thanks to you and them all!

Bonjour à tous !

Voici la première partie de notre vidéo de notre série “Portraits de Shizuoka” qui a la volonté de montrer le visage de ceux qui travaillent à rendre notre département ce qu’il est. Nous nous efforçons de nous focaliser plus sur les “gens” que sur leur art sans pour autant oublier d’en parler.

Ces vidéos sont le fruit de résidents à Shizuoka uniquement, depuis plusieurs dizaines d’années pour certains. Pour vous donner une image de notre travail… imaginez par exemples des japonais en Bourgogne et présentant les bourguignons ! C’est une démarche qui sort un peu de l’ordinaire mais nous croyons en son intérêt.

Il existe à notre connaissance peu de fournisseurs de vidéos en français sur le Japon se focalisant essentiellement sur un département, à l’heure où le Japon est de mieux en mieux connu, nous voulons parler du local, pour eux, mais aussi pour vous, pour essayer de vous dresser au fil des vidéos une idée de ce qu’est une région japonaise ainsi que ses particularités. Nous n’avons pas la prétention de couvrir le territoire japonais en entier et cela n’est pas notre but. Nous croyons qu’avec le virus, il est important de se focaliser sur la région qui nous héberge et n’avons pas la prétention d’en connaître encore toutes les richesses et espérons que vous pourrez en profiter avec nous…derrière votre écran ou un jour sur place !

Le travail étant totalement amateur, et sans contrepartie financière, j’espère que vous nous pardonnerez les erreurs de débutants dans ce premier montage dont nous avons conscience (son, décor et transitions précisément) qui seront réglées dans le prochain épisode. En ce qui concerne cette vidéo, elle est découpée en deux parties : La première est une introduction assez générale avec la présentation de l’usine à thé de Marufuku, et la deuxième aborde des points plus personnels (condition d’une femme cheffe d’entreprise, difficultés et vie personnelle), n’hésitez pas à vous reporter directement à celle-ci selon le sujet qui vous intéresse. Il est important de respecte la vie privée et le travail des gens à qui nous faisons appel, qui sont pour beaucoup des amis/connaissances. Si vous désirez rentrer en contact avec eux merci de passer par nous. Nous sommes spécialisés sur Shizuoka, et y vivons pour certains depuis plusieurs dizaines d’années.

La gastronomie locale est un de nos axes principaux, merci de vous reporter aux pages suivantes pour suivre nos articles : https://shizuokagourmet.com/ (Français/Anglais) https://saveursdujapon.me/ (Français) https://www.facebook.com/Japanecdote/ Inutile de préciser que la vidéo est la propriété de notre chaîne 🙂 Nous espérons que cela vous plaira et attendons tous vos commentaires et à y répondre. Merci à vous, merci à eux.

Lobster: Basic Sashimi Preparation/Langouste : PRéparation standard de sashimi

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To answer Christina’s question (visit her great blog at Lobster Queen!) who asked if a lobster could be eaten raw, here is the basic recipe for preparing it.
Note that lobsters are fine, but spiny lobsters are best, especially small/medium specimens!

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The lobster should be still alive before you start proceeding.
First clean the live lobster under running clear cold water.
Note that live lobsters are very “lively”!

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Use a short and sharp wide blade knife.
Maintaining the lobster securely in one hand, stab the lobster with the knife point deeply just behind the head at a slant forward.

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You should be able to easily twist the tail away from the head.

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Put the head aside (will come onto the plate later).

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Turn tail over and cut bewteen soft underbelly part and hard shell part.

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Cut along both sides.

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You should be able to easily pull out the underbelly shell. If you have problems pulling it out, insert a spoon between the shell and the flesh.
Should come out easily then.

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Pull the flesh out the shell.
Peel off the thin brown skin and discard.

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First cut tail flesh lengthwise through the middle.
Take innards out and discard.
Ten cut the flesh across into one bite size (small size by European/American standards!).

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Drop into iced water and clean off the sticky juices. As the flesh will turn white if you leave it in the water too long, this process should not last more than 1 minute!

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Take water off in kitchen paper.

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Using the shell (cleaned in cold running water and wiped), arrange sashimi as above. Very easy!
You will find out that the flesh is sweet.
A little wasabi and soy sauce (ponzu is even better) is all you need!

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On nous demande souvent si la langouste peut se déguster cru, et voici la réponse avec une recette simple !

Les homards sont utilisables pour cette recette mais les langoustes seront préférées, de petite/moyenne taille de préférence.

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La langouste doit être vivante avant de commencer le processus. D’abord commencer par laver l’animal sous de l’eau propre coulante en continu. Attention car les langoutes vivantes sont très vivaces et frétillants.

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Utilisez une lame courte et bien aiguisée et faites en sorte de bien stabiliser le homard quand vous le tenez de l’autre main, poignardez derrière la tête, celle-ci incliné vers l’avant (voir les photos).

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Avec un mouvement de torsion vous devriez être en mesure de séparer les deux morceaux.

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Mettez la tête de côté (elle servira de décoration !)

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Retournez la queue et coupez entre la partie charnue et molle et la partie dure de la carapace.

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Tranchez de tout le long.

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Vous devriez pouvoir ensuite retirer toute la carapace de la queue. Si jamais cela coinçait quelque part, s’aide d’une cuillère en la mettant entre la chair et la carapace devrait faire sortir tout ce beau monde !

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Sortez la chair, et retirer la pellicule marron et récupérez le précieux aliment 🙂

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Ensuite coupez la chair de la queue comme sur la photo dans le sens de la longueur, retirez les impuretés à l’intérieur.

Ensuite coupez les morceaux de manière à ce que cela puisse faire une bouchée…japonaise (donc petite pour les gourmands que nous sommes).

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Mettez le tout dans de l’eau gelée et nettoyez ensuite tout ce qui pourrait avoir une texture un peu collante. Comme la chair va devenir blanche si vous la laissez dans l’eau trop longtemps, tout doit être fait en une minute maximum.

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Posez le tout sur un sopalin pour absorber l’eau.

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Utiliser la carapace lavée vous permettra de présenter les choses ainsi, c’est relativement facile et en envoie plein les mirettes.

La chair obtenue est sucrée. Un peu de wasabi et de sauce soja ou ponzu permet de varier les goûts !

Bon appétit !

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Local fish: “Houbou”/Blue Fin Robin

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi
Shizuoka Pics

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A couple days ago, my good friend Patrick Harrington rightly pointed out on the importance to eat “local” as much as possible. Consequently, I will endeavour whenever possible to introduce any vegetables, dairy products, meat and fish grown, made, raised or caught in Shizuoka Prefecture (and its waters)
As for today I would like to introduce a fairly cheap and tasty fish: houbou. Its English name is quite poetic: blue fin robin (“Chelidonichthys spinosus” for the purists)
Some call it grotesque, others beautiful. It earned its name because of it darkish red colour and bluish fins.
Most of them are found in Niigata Prefecture from in Winter (30~50 cm), but they are caught in early Spring in Suruga Bay (the Shizuoka variety is smaller, up to 20 cm).

It can be prepared in many ways:

Sashimi and sushi if just caught

In “nabe” (soup pot) or as “nimono” (simmered) in Japanese-style cuisine.

Steamed and served with a sweet and sour sauce in Chinese-style food.

My preferred way is Mediterranean style (one fish per person):
Cut the side fins and scrape the scales off. Clean the insides. Make a couple of shallow incisions over each flank.
Fill the stomach with a mixture of finely chopped vegetables and herbs (leave your imagination free!).
Put it on a large sheet of olive oil coated cooking foil paper, sprinkle it with a little salt and pepper. Place vegetables cut in long strings on both sides (plenty is fine), and one or two thin lemoon slices on top. Coat it with some (not too much) extra virgin oil. As a last touch, I add some white wine and a little anise spirit (Pernod, Ricard or Absinthe).
Lossely envelop the fish with the foil paper, close both ends by twisting them around.
Place the fish in its foil paer directly on the metal plate inside an preheated at 180 degrees Celsius and cook for about 15 minutes (longer for large fish).
If you do not have an oven, steam it the Chinese way!

Il y a quelques jour, mon ami Patrick Harrington m’a indiqué avec justesse la nécessité de manger autant local que possible. Dans cette optique je vais essayer de présenter autant que possible la richesse de l’agriculture, la pisciculture et l’élevage à Shizuoka.

Pour commencer je voudrais parler du houbou, le grondin rouge, bon marché et très goûteux poisson. Certains disent qu’il est grotesque alors que d’autres le considèrent comme plutôt joli. Son nom anglais  “blue fin robin” vient de ses ailerons bleutés et sa couleur rouge foncé. La plupart d’entre eux se pêchent en hiver dans le département de Niigata (30~50 cm), mais à Shizuoka et dans la baie de Suruga, une plus petite espèce se pêche et elle mesure vers les 20 cm).

On peut le cuisiner de plusieurs façons : En sashimi si il est encore tout frais, dans un “nabe” (une sorte de pot-au-feu japonais), en “nimono” (mariné) à la japonaise. On le trouve aussi cuit vapeur avec une sauce aigre-douce de style chinois.

Je conseille personnellement la version méditerranéenne (1 poisson par personne) : Coupez les ailerons latéraux, et dépouillez le de ses écailles, retirez les entrailles et nettoyez. Incisez le ensuite sur les flancs.

Remplissez son ventre avec un mélanger de légumes hachés finement et d’herbes selon votre bon goût !

Mettez-le ensuite sur une large feuille d’aluminium recouverte d’huile d’olive, salez et poivrez-le. Découpez des légumes dans leur longueur et déposez-les aux côtés du poisson (ayez la main lourde si vous le voulez!), ajoutez aussi deux trois fines tranches de citron dessus.

Pour le final recouvrez-le d’un peu d’huile d’olive et d’alcool d’anis (Pernod, Ricard ou Absinthe).

Fermez ensuite la papillotte d’aluminium en nouant ses deux bords . Mettez le poisson au four sur une plaque de métal préchauffée à 180 degrés pendant 15 minutes (voire plus selon la taille du poisson).

Si vous n’avez pas de four je recommande alors la préparation dite “à la chinoise “!

Patisserie Noan IN YAIZU/ パティスリーノアン 焼津

Ouverte depuis le début de l’année 2019 non loin du port de Oigawa, la pâtisserie Noan est une perle qui mérite d’être découverte ! C’est plutôt le hasard qui m’a mené ici suite à la recherche d’une pâtisserie sur Google Maps alors que je faisais une activité de pêche en mer.

Open since the beginning of 2019 and not far from the port of Oigawa, the Noan pastry shop is a hidden gem that deserves to be discovered!Luck brought me there after searching for a pastry shop on Google Maps while I was doing a sea fishing activity

N’ayant jamais entendu parler de cette pâtisserie, j’ai décidé de m’y rendre poussé par les nombreux commentaires élogieux !

Having never heard of this pastry shop, I decided to go there pushed by the many positive feedbacks i read !

J’ai été amusé de voir l’ambiance familiale qui y régnait, Noan est géré efficacement de manière familiale et il n’est pas rare de voir la soeur arriver en courant pour prêter main forte en cas d’affluence ! Elle gère une petite boutique de produits de la mer à côté, l’occasion de déguster les Sakura Ebi en pleine saison (en ce moment d’ailleurs !)

I was impressed by the family teamwork, Noan is managed efficiently and it is not uncommon to see the sister running in to lend a hand in case of a rush! She runs a small seafood store next door, an it is indeed the opportunity to taste the Sakura Ebi in high season (its now, run to taste it!)

Le nom de la pâtisserie viendrait d’une ville française, je n’ai pas su la retracer mais si un de nos lecteurs se sentait l’esprit d’investigation ?! Je suppose que c’est probablement Nohant, dans le Berry, chez la bucolique George Sand et son fidèle Chopin dont la romance fait encore écho dans nos oreilles ?

The name of the pastry would come from a French city, I could not fin which one it but if one of our readers feel the spirit of investigation you are welcome to mage your suggestions ?! I guess it’s probably Nohant, in Berry, the home of the bucolic George Sand and her faithful Chopin?

Façade de la pâtisserie, froufrou et ambiance un peu rétro ! Front of the pastry shop, frilly and a little retro atmosphere !

Le nœud papillon est un peu le snacks “signature” ! Décliné sous plusieurs variations.

We can say the bow tie is the “signature” snack! Available in several variations.

Le fraisier : Très bon, et dont les fruits ont le goût de fruit !

The strawberry cake “fraisier”: Very good, and whose fruits have the taste of fruit !

Le gâteau au chocolat “Nuit”. Probablement mon préféré et celui de ma famille ! Délicieux de la tête aux pieds. On trouve d’ailleurs au pied du gâteau un biscuit au chocolat. Dans la plupart de ces gâteaux il sert de support à la structure, mais le chef a su rendre ce dernier délicieux, une prouesse !

The chocolate cake “Night”. Probably my favorite and so says my family! Delicious from head to toe. There is also a chocolate cookie at the bottom of the cake. In most of these cakes it is used as a support for the structure, but the chef knew how to make it delicious, a feat !

Prise de vue de “travers” technique de prise de photo ancestrale de mon ami Robert-Gilles. Voici le couple à l’œuvre dans les fourneaux !

Ancestral shooting technique of my friend Robert-Gilles. Here is the couple at work in the ovens : Very friendly and always welcoming people with a great smile.

Enfin image basique mais qui n’est pas des moindres ! Le chef a obtenu le second prix de la foire gastronomique de Dijon ! Prouesse si on considère son jeune âge à l’époque, probablement dans la vingtaine. Foire de haut niveau… et de mon département de naissance, raison de plus pour se sucrer l’estomac.

Last but not least, this simple image! The chef was awarded second prize at the gastronomic fair in Dijon! Miracle if we consider his young age at the time, probably in his twenties. High level fair of my my birth department, one more reason to sweeten your stomach.

Verdict : Probablement l’une des meilleurs pâtisseries de Yaizu, se trouvant là où l’on ne l’attend pas. La technique du chef est très palpable et l’on sent clairement l’influence française qui s’est effacée derrière un goût plus proche de celui que les japonais adulent. On sent un certaine exigences derrière la qualité des matériaux, ce qui se reflète aussi sur le prix qui est un tout petit plus élevé que la moyenne, mais qui l’est de manière très justifiée !

Verdict: Probably one of Yaizu’s best pastries, being where you don’t expect it. The chef’s technique is very palpable and you can clearly feel the French influence which has faded behind a taste closer to the one the Japanese love. We can feel a certain level of demand behind the quality of the materials, which is also reflected in the price which is a little higher than average, but very justified !

Nous n’avons pu parler des Kakigori (glace pillée japonaise) qui sont de véritable chef d’oeuvre, je vous invite à vérifier par vous même leur facebook !

We could not talk about the Kakigori (Japanese shaved ice cream) which are real masterpieces, I invite you to check by yourself their facebook!

J’apprécie aussi particulièrement la mise à jour régulière de leur line-up, très régulière.

I also particularly appreciate the regular update of their line-up, very regular.

N’hésitez pas à venir vous installer et déguster même sur place, Noan n’a rien à envier aux pâtisseries Tokyoïtes.

Don’t hesitate to come and settle down for eating on the spot, Noan has nothing to envy to the pastries of Tokyo.

Adresse/Adress : 吉永1423-3 Yaizu, Préfecture de Shizuoka, Japon 421-0211

Tél : 054-659-7737

Ouvert de 10H00 à 19 heures sauf le mercredi

Open from 10H00am to pm except wednesday

Possibilité de faire des gâteaux sur mesure pour anniversaires et avec créativité !

Possibility to make custom birthday cakes with creativity!

Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/patisserienoan/about/

Site internet/Website : https://noan2019.on.omisenomikata.jp/

Takuan/Japanese Pickled Daikon: Basic Recipe/ Pickle de radis japonais : Takuan !

French version down

Takuan (沢庵), also known as takuwan or takuan-zuke, is a popular traditional Japanese pickle. It is made from daikon radish. In addition to being served alongside other types of tsukemono/Japanese-style pickles in traditional Japanese cuisine, takuan is also enjoyed at the end of meals as it is thought to aid digestion.

Takuan is made by first hanging a daikon radish in the sun for a few weeks until it becomes flexible. Next, the daikon is placed in a pickling crock and covered with a mix of salt, rice bran, optionally sugar, daikon greens, kombu/Dry seaweed, and perhaps chilli pepper and/or dried persimmon peels/even flowers for colouring. A weight is then placed on top of the crock, and the daikon is allowed to pickle for several months. The finished takuan is usually yellow in colour, although most mass-produced takuan rely on food coloring for this effect.

Takuan is popular also in South Korea, and is called danmuji (단무지). It is used as a filling for gimbap, or as an accompaniment to Korean dishes, typically jajangmyeon.

Here is a simple basic recipe to make when you get hold of plenty cheap daikon. Since it is vegan in nature, it shoild please everyone!
Check the extra recipe for ideas!

INGREDIENTS: Bear in mind that the bigger the batch, the better!

-Daikon: 10~15 with their leaves!
-Rice bran: 15 % of the dried daikon weight
-Salt: 6% of the dried daikon weight
-Brown Sugar: half a tablespoon
-Chili pepper: half one, chopped, fresh
-Konbu/dry seaweed: 3~5 cm piece chopped thin
-Fruit peel (persimmon, orange according to colour): 2 fruits
-White sugar: 1 tablespoon per daikon

FIRST RECIPE:

Wash the daikon with their leaves. It is important to dry them with their leaves as to prevent a loos in quality. Place them to dry in a spot well exposed to the sun and wind. Let them dry for 1~2 weeks. Bring them inside at night if you think morning dew will come on them!
They will be ready the moment they bend easily.

-Wipe daikon with a clean towel.
Weight the daikon then and prepare rice bran (15% of daikon weight) and salt (6% of daikon weight).

-Cut the leaves with the end of the daikon. Cut enough of the daikon so that the leaves hold together. Put leaves aside. You will use them later!

-Put each daikon (work on one at a time) on a working table. Roll it by solidly pressing your palms on the daikon all along its length to soften evental hard spots and even the humidity inside.

-In a separate bowl pour in the rice bran, salt, brown sugar, chopped konbu/seaweed, chopped chili pepper and white sugar. Mix well.

-Use a large pickles jar/bucket.
First line the bottom with some of the pickle mixture.
Line a first layer of daikon, leaving as little sapce between as possible.
Sprinkle with pickle mixture.
Fill any space left with the daikon leaves.
Repeat same procedure with the rest of the daikon.

-Line the top with the remaining daikon leaves.
Press down with your hands, putting all your weight behind your hands.
Sprinkle some extra salt over the top to prevent mold from forming.

You can use a special pickle vat as in picture above and screw down the lid for maximum pressure.
If you uve a normal vat, plce a clean wooden or plastic circle on top of the daikon and lay a weight/stone at least 3 times the weight of the daikon.
In the latter case cover with newspaper and a lid to prevent any dust insid.e

-Pickle for 4 weeks in winter, or 3 weeks in summer.
Clean them quickly in clean cold running water before cutting and serving them!

SECOND RECIPE: Traditional but the process is the same!

INGREDIENTS:

-1) Dried daikon: 12 kg
-2) Rice bran: 1.5 kg
-3) Salt: 720 g
-4) Kaki/Persimmon (frozen): 5~6
-Chili peppers: 10 (cut in halves9
-Konbu/seaweed: 40 cm (to be chopped)

Look at the pictures, the process is the same!

Drying

Soft enough to bend

Cutting the leaves away

Pickle mixture

Pickle mixture added with kobu, chili peppers and persimmons

Fitting the daikon in tightly

Covering with the pickle mixture

Covering with the leaves

Putting the weights on top!

Two months later.

Washed, cut and served!

Le Takuan (沢庵), aussi appelé takuwan ou takuan-zuke est un pickle traditionnel japonais courant ! Il est fait à partir de radis japonais daikon et est servi avec d’autres légumes vinaigrés dans les plats traditionnels japonais. On peut aussi le consomme en fin de repas étant donné qu’il est réputé pour favoriser la digestion !

Tout d’abord il vous faudra suspendre le radis au soleil pendant quelques semaines pour qu’il soit plus maléable, ensuite il faudra le placé dans un pot de fermentation recouvert d’un mélange de sel, de son de riz, et à votre goût du sucre, d’algue kombu ou autre algue séchée ou du piment, de la peau de kaki et même des fleurs qui donneront de la couleur à votre ouvrage ! La plupart des takuan utilisent la couleur comme argument de vente !

On trouve le Takuan en Corée du Sud sous le nom de danmuji (단무지) souvent utilisé comme garniture pour le gimbap ou en accompagnement d’autres plats tels que le jajangmyeon.

Voici une recette simple et utile si vous mettez la main sur plein de daikon, ou alors les obtenez à bon prix !. Une recette végétarienne qui devrait vous donner des idées.

INGREDIENTS: Gardez à l’esprit que plus c’est gros, mieux c’est !

-Daikon: 10~15 avec leurs feuilles!
-Son de riz: 15 % du poids des daikon
-Sel: 6% du poids des daikon secs
-Sucre brun: la moitié d’une cuillère à soupe
-Piment: Une demi piment frais et haché
-Konbu/algue sèche: 3~5 cm haché finement
-Peua de fruits : (selon la couleur que vous voudrez, kaki ou orange): 2 fruits
-Sucre blanc: 1 cuillère à soupe par légume

Première recette :

Lavez le daikon avec ses feuilles. Il est important qu’ils soient séchés avec le feuilles pour ne pas qu’ils perdent en qualité. Mettez-les dans un un endroit sec et bien exposé au soleil et au vent. Laissez les sécher pendant une ou deux semaines. Ramnez les dans l’intérieur de la maison pendant la nuit si vous pensez que la rosée va les endommager ! Ils seront considérés comme prêts une fois que vous pourrez les plier facilement.

Essuyez-les avec un linge propre et pesez-le pour faire en sorte que le son de riz en pèse 15 pour cent et 6 pour cent de sel.

Coupez les feuilles à l’extrémitié du daikon. Coupez-le assez pour que les feuilles restent liées entre elles et gardez-les de côté pour une utilisation ultérieure.

Mettez chaque daikon (maniez-en un seul à la fois) sur un plan de travail. Roulez-le fermement avec vos paumes et sur toute sa longueur pour ramollir les nœuds un peu trop durs et en retirer l’humidité.

Dans un récipient séparé, mettez le son de riz, le sucre brun, les algues hachées finement, les piments et le sucre blanc. Mélangez bien.

Prenez ensuite un gros récipient, et au premier étage mettez vos pickles en faisant en sorte que ce premier étage ait peut d’espace entre ses pickles. Saupoudrez-le avec la mixture et remplissez les espaces avec les feuilles. Refaire cette procédure avec tous les daikons que vous avez sous la main.

Couvrez le dessus avec le reste de vos feuilles de daiko, et appuyez de tout votre poids. Saupoudrez de sel pour éviter la moisissure.

Vous pouvez utiliser un accessoir pour pickles comme celui ci-dessus pour un maximum de pression, il suffira de placer un bout de bois propre ou de plastique au dessus des daikons ainsi qu’une pierre d’environs trois fois le poids des radis japonais ! Dans ce cas il faudra couvrir avec des journaux pour bloquer l’entrée de particules étrangères.

-Pickle for 4 weeks in winter, or 3 weeks in summer.
Clean them quickly in clean cold running water before cutting and serving them!

Laissez fermenter tout ce beau monde 4 semaines en hiver et 3 en été. Nettoyez les ensuite rapidement avec de l’eau froide avant de les couper et les servir.

Deuxième recette: La méthode à l’ancienne, mais qui suit un peu le même processus !

INGREDIENTS:

-Son de riz: 1,5 kg
-Sel: 720grammes
 Piment: Une dizaine coupés en moitié
-Konbu/algue sèche:  40 cm à hacher
– Kaki (congelés) : 5 ou 

Séchage

On vérifie la flexibilité !

On coupe les feuilles !

La mixture à pickles!

Avec les algues, les kakis et les piments.

On serre les daikons !

On couvre le tout avec la mixture !

Puis les feuilles !

On met un peu de poids là dessus.

Et voici après deux mois.

Le festin après lavage !

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Bread + Butter, Comestilblog, Greedy Girl, Bouchon For 2, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Mangantayon, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles, Lexi, Culinary Musings, Eats and Everything, Bite Me New England, Heather Sweet, Warren Bobrow, 5 Star Foodie, Frank Fariello, Oyster Culture, Ramendo, Alchemist Chef, Ochikeron, Mrs. Lavendula, The Gipsy Chef, Spirited Miu Flavor, Wheeling Gourmet, Chef de Plunge, Sushi Nomads, Island Vittles, The French Market Maven, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glas, Palate To Pen, Tokyo Foodcast, Good Beer & Country Boys, Tokyo Terrace, Think Twice, Jefferson’s Table, While mY Sautoir Gently Weeps

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Tofu Recipe: Aburaage/ Recette de Tofu : Aburaage

ABURAAGE-1
(Aburaage Soup)

Aburaage is basically a deep-fried thin slice of tofu.
It does offer a very versatile option as it can be used as it is, or open as a pouch it becomes the base for inari sushi and many other variations!

Here is a simple recipe:

INGREDIENTS:
Tofu (firm Momen tofu type): 1 large piece/block (Icho in Japanese)
Thick Towel
Cellophane paper
Long wooden disposable chopsticks (wari-bashi)
“Piano string”, or the equivalent
Water drainer
Oil
Oil thermometer (up to 200 degrees Celsius)

RECIPE:

ABURAAGE-2
Make identations or marks on the chopsticks every 5 mm up to the height of the tofu block.

ABURAAGE-3
Tie “piano string” around chopsticks as shown on pic first at 10 mm height (or higher up to 15 mm if you wish), and cut tofu by sliding chopsticks along the cutting table (it should easy, but make sure you cut tofu evenly!)

ABURAAGE-4
Tofu being soft, it is not easy to manipulate.
Later, when you will manipulate it, the best way is to first turn over the whole onto your open palm and have each slice slide away.

ABURAAGE-6
Before manipulating the tofu, first put a 500g weight (anything over a thin wooden plank if you don’t have asushi weight) on top of the tofu for 2 hours to get as much water off as possible.
Transfer slices onto thick towel and leave them there for an hour.

ABURAAGE-7
First frying step: fry tofu slice at 130 degrees Celsius (make sure to keep the temperature constant!) for 6 minutes. This will allow for a uniform heating.

ABURAAGE-8
Second frying step: bring oil temperature to 160 degrees Celsius.
If tofu contains too much water or if you fry in a single step, it will fail to achieve the right shape and quality.

ABURAAGE-9
Aburaage will usually be a bit hard upon frying.

ABURAAGE-10
To make it soft, wrap it in cellophane paper and and heat inside electric oven. As soon as water comes out of aburaage inside the cellopahne paper, take the whole out and unwrap aburaage.

ABURAAGE-11
The aburaage should be soft by then.

ABURAAGE-12
Check if the aburaage needs a second frying (according to your liking).
if you fry it at 130 degrees, it will reduce as the one on the right in the picture.
If you fry it at 160 degrees you will obtain an aburaage like the left one on the picture (longer one).

ABURAAGE-13
To properly open it, cut in half, and then cut inside to form a pouch!

Recette de Tofu frit : Aburaage

ABURAAGE-1
(Soupe de Aburaage )

L’aburaage est un une fine tranche de tofu que l’on fait frire. C’est une met assez polyvalent, car il peut être dégusté tel quel (recouvert de sauce soja, et de gingembre en le faisant un peu griller par exemple), en soupe, ou alors devenir l’enveloppe d’inari sushi.

Je vous donne une recette simple mais il en existe bien d’autres, notamment on peut jouer sur l’épaisseur du tofu frit.

:

INGREDIENTS:
Tofu (type momen) :  1 bloc (Icho en japonais)

Une serviette épaisse
Du film célophane
Des baguettes longues (wari-bashi)
Une corde de piano, ou quelque chose équivalent
Un égouttoir
De l’huile
Et un thermomètre qui peut monter jusqu’à 200 degrés.

RECETTE:

ABURAAGE-2

Faire des marques tous les 5mm le long de la hauteur du bloc (Cela représente la future hauteur découpée). Vous pouvez aussi enrouler la corde de piano le long des baquettes que vous aurez aussi marquées tous les 5 millimètres.

ABURAAGE-3

Enrouler la corde de piano comme ci-dessus le long des baguettes. Commencez à partir de 10mm en haut, voire 15 si vous voulez et coupez le tofu en faisant glisser les baguette le long de la planche à découper. Ce n’est pas compliqué mais soyez sûr d’être bien droits.

ABURAAGE-4

Le tofu même quand il est en bloc n’est pas facile à manipuler, alors les tranches, je vous laisse imaginer. L’idéal est quand vous le manipuler de toujours saisir ses tranches dans l’intégralité de la paume de votre main.

ABURAAGE-6

Avant de commencer, mettez un poids de 500g sur le tofu, de quoi faire pression pour en évacuer l’eau. Cela prendra deux heures. Ensuite posez-le sur une serviette pour extraire encore plus d’eau.

ABURAAGE-7

Première friture : Il faut le chauffer à 130 degrés, et que cette température ne varie pas pendant 6 minutes. L’uniformité de la cuisson est indispensable.

ABURAAGE-8
Deuxième friture: On monte à 160 degrés. Si vous avez trop d’eau dans votre tofu, et si vous ne respectez pas les étapes, vous allez le rater.

ABURAAGE-9
L’aburaage est un peu dur une fois la cuisson terminée.

ABURAAGE-10

Pour le rendre plus mou, il faut le mettre dans du papier cellophane et le chauffer au four électrique. Quand l’eau s’échappe de l’aburaage il se ramollira.

ABURAAGE-11
Vous devez obtenir ce résultat.

ABURAAGE-12

Vérifiez si vous avez besoin de faire une deuxième friture, selon votre goût. 130 degrés vous donnerons le résultat de droite sur la photos du dessus, 160 celui de gauche (plus long).

ABURAAGE-13
En général quand vous le coupez en deux, vous voyez si vous avez réussi… ou pas !

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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[French/Japanese] Portraits de Shizuoka #3: Aizome, teinture à l’indigo

Bonjour à tous ! Aujourd’hui nous vous présentons un atelier de teinture à l’Indigo à Shizuoka, depuis 8 générations.

Nous croyons qu’avec le virus, il est important de se focaliser sur la région qui nous héberge et n’avons pas la prétention d’en connaître encore toutes les richesses et espérons que vous pourrez en profiter avec nous…derrière votre écran ou un jour sur place ! Il est nécessaire de respecter la vie privée et le travail des gens à qui nous faisons appel, qui sont pour beaucoup des amis/connaissances. Si vous désirez rentrer en contact avec eux merci de passer par nous. Nous sommes spécialisés sur Shizuoka, et y vivons pour certains depuis plusieurs dizaines d’années. La gastronomie locale est un de nos axes principaux, merci de vous reporter aux pages suivantes pour suivre nos articles :

https://shizuokagourmet.com/ (Français/Anglais) https://saveursdujapon.me/ (Français) https://www.facebook.com/Japanecdote/

Inutile de préciser que la vidéo est la propriété de notre chaîne 🙂 Nous espérons que cela vous plaira et attendons tous vos commentaires. Merci à vous.

[English/Japanese] Portraits of Shizuoka #3 : Aizome, Indigo Dyeing

Greetings everyone Today we will talk about the Shizuoka traditionnal dyeing : Aizome

It is of utmost importance to respect the private life and work of the people we introduce, many of whom are friends/personal acquaintances. If you wish to contact them we would be most grateful that you proceed through us first.

We specialize in Shizuoka where we have lived tens of years. The local gastronomy is one of our main focuses. We invite you to peruse the following sites to follow our reports:

https://shizuokagourmet.com/ (French/English) https://saveursdujapon.me/ (French) https://www.facebook.com/Japanecdote

e kindly remind you that this video is our sole property. We believe that because of the Covid 19 it is important to focus on our particular region which has welcomed us along the years but we do not pretend to know all its richness yet and hope you will discover and enjoy them together with us… in front of your screen or one day on site! Our most sincere thanks to you and them all!

Portraits of Shizuoka #2: MIZUTORI, Original Japanese Geta (FRENCH/ENGLISH/JAPANESE)

Greetings everyone !(EN/FR CAPTION AVALAIBLE) Today we will introduce an other video about Shizuoka Prefecture and its craftsmen. In this movie we will interview an international couple Canadian/Japanese who took the head of the family company, making traditional Japanese Geta (wooden shoes).

Bonjour à tous ! (SOUS-TITRES FR/EN) Aujourd’hui nous vous présentons une autre vidéo sur la préfecture de Shizuoka et ses artisans. Dans cette vidéo nous nous intéresserons à un couple international Canado/Japonais qui ont hérite de l’entreprise familiale de fabrication de Geta, les sandales en bois traditionnelles japonaises.

Shizuoka Prefecture Patisserie: Jour Du Muguet with Toshiyuki Nakanishi in Okabe, Fujieda City!

Toshiyuki and kazumi Nakanishi!

Toshiyuki Nakanishi had a lot of courage when he decided to open his own patisserie quite a few years ago in Okabe, Fujieda City with his wife Kazumi whi hais from the same place.
But it handsomely paid off because of the dearth of good cakes in this seemingly off the beaten tracks village part of Fujieda City.

The patisserie looks like a small shop in the French countryside!

Truth to tell, Toshiyuki had already made his name before moving to his wife’s home village, including a winter stint at Chez Allex, a patisserie which earned no less than two MOF in Chalon sur saone, Bourgogne, France!

“Jour Du Muguet” means “Lily of the Valley day”, a celebrated family festival day back in France!

In fact the choice of Okabe proved to be a weapon in disguise as the shop is located near a main thoroughfare and a regular bus station, and has its own car park, meaning that the locals are very happy to ride, walk, drive there to buy cakes they would have to travel far to find the same quality!

The small kids playplace seen from outside1

Although the shop itself is barely bigger than the kitchen, it is big enough even including a small shelf with toys for kids to play with!
And of course it is spotless clean!
Kazumi lokks after the shop while Toshiyuki keeps busy in kitchen!

Note that the place is closed on Tuesdays and on the 3rd or 4th Monday.
Come early as cakes disappear quickly!

half of the fresh cakes are seasonal although they include permanent features such rolled cakes and succuent petit choux/chou cream (definitely for adults)!

Interestingly enough there quite a few expats with a sweet tooth living in the area and don’t be surprised if you suddenly discover a loud speaking Ozzie there!

Classic macarons!

More cakes!

And more cakes!

For the kids while their mothers are having a hard time choosing their cakes!

Toshiyuki’s cakes are simply put first class but a big bonus comes with his bicuits, pound cakes and what other delicacies, either sold individually,…

or in nice wrappings for presents!

And Toshiyuki has the great merit to advertise and sell local products of great quality and originality!

Every visit is definitely worth the long way (in my case, especially!) and I know so many people, Japanese or expats, who agree!

JOUR DU MUGUET

〒421-1131 Shizuoka Prefecture, Fujieda City, Okabe, Uchigaya, 900-4
Tel: 054-667-5104
Opening hours: 10:00~19:00
Closed on Tuesdays and 3rd or 4th Monday
Car Park available
Custom-made cakes orders welcome!

GOOGLE MAP

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

BON APPETIT TOKYO
So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Shizuoka Sake Tasting: Hamamatsu Brewery Shussejo Tokubetsu Junmai Homarefuji

The other day I had with my good Quebcquois friend, Jonathan Barnabe, to taste a brew by one of my favorite breweries in Shizuoka Prefecture, namely Hamamatsu Brewery!
Shussejo Tokubetsu Junmai Homarefuji!

I bought it for a few reasons:
It is so easy to find it in Shizuoka City.
The brewmaster is a lady!
It was a practical 300ml bottle, perfect for tasting together with a friend!

Rice: Homarefuji (Shizuoka Prefecture) 100%
Rice milled down to 60%
Alcohol: 15~16 degrees
Bottled in February 2020

Clarity: very clear
Color: almost transparent
Aroma: dry, fruity, complex. pineapple, vanilla, wheat, flowers, almonds.
Tasting: slightly sirupy. dry and smooth attack. Very easy on the palate.
Complex. Plums, almonds, roasted nuts.
Lingers for a while before ending on a drier note with faint coffee beans.
Turns sllghtly drier with food.
Goes back quickly to initial state once away from food although mikan make an appearance.

Comments: both elegant and strong-minded sake! definitely for both genders who will have a great time opposing their views!
Great on its own. I actually tasted with my good friend in the afternoon!
dangerous as it disappears quickly! LOL

Recommended pairings: chocolate, cheese, fried potatoes.

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

West Coast Brewing Beer Bar “12” in Shizuoka City!

From outside!

From the standing bar!

Service: very friendly and informative,. English and Spanish speaking staff on hand.
Equipment & Facilities: Spotless clean. Superb gender separated washrooms. Completely non-smoking.
Prices: reasonable to slightly expensive (Craft beers are never cheap! LOL)
Strong points: Own craft beers, regular and limited editions. Collaboration beers from time to time. Great craft beer explanations on hand! Beer bar food well above average.

“12”, the leading West Coast Brewing (Mochimune, Suruga Ku, Shizuoka City) bar was moved to a new address on March 12th, 2020, to accommodate more faithful customers in a more spacious multi purpose locale almost next door to the smaller original bar behind Ogushi Shrine, not far from Shuzoka JR station in Koyamachi!

Friends of mine sitting at one of the live evenings space tables!

The present concept is vastly different and the accent is on space and comfort for all tastes!
There is a very long counter for those who prefer to stand and move according to the presence of friends!
There are tables of different sizes with comfortable sitting for more sedentary customers.

Plenty of sitting space in front of large bay windows which be left open in the better season!

A very long standing bar by Shizuoka City Standards!

And a luxury in Shizuoka City: an open air veranda!
You can be sure that for all my love of standing bars I will grab a seat there in the hotter season!

Big screens advertising beers on the taps!

For the canned beer lovers there is plenty to choose among beers and ciders from Seattle!

Do not worry, for the non beer drinking customers/friends there plenty indicated on a very practical menu book!

The craft beer part makes for great reading!
below is a sample of the craft beers i have recently tasted!

Star Watcher IPA!

White Wizard!

White Wizard explained!

Not Enough Bass!

Not Enough Bass explained!

Don’t worry, when I have more time I will come up with tasting article1

Now, when it comes to food, it is definitely well above average!
make sure to read the bilingual menu!

A favorite of mine: Fish and Chips with real fresh cod!

Between you and me, better than in Great Britain!

And from April top-class hamburger!
But this is for the next article!

Until then Cheers/Sante/Salute/Kampai!

“12” by WEST COAST BREWING

420-0852 Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Koyamachi, 7-14,, Ogushi Bldg dai 2-102, 1F
Tel.: 054-2048188
Opening hours: 11:00~24:00 (Tuesday~Saturday), 11:00~2000 (Sunday)
Closed on Mondays
Free live concerts on Saturdays (note that they will be resumed after the Coronavirus Epidemics)
Credit Cards Ok
Parties welcome

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Shizuoka Sake Tasting: Eikun Brewery (Yui) Junmai Ginjo Muroka Nama Genshu (conducted at la Sommeliere in Shizuoka City)

I have said it time and again, when it comes to tasting local sake I often do it In La Sommeliere in Shizuoka City in the company of Hiromi Hasegawa as it is cheaper and certainly more entertaining! That is at least for only a part of the vast array of nectars being brewed in this Prefecture! LOL

This time I tasted an Eikun Brewery (Shizuoka City, Shimizu Ku, Yui) sake with a very long name!
Eikun Junmai Ginjo Muroka nama Genshu, meaning a junmai ginjo which went through no modification ever!

Rice: Bizen Omachi (Okayama Prefecture)
Rice milled down to 55%
Yeast: Shizuoka yeast
Alcohol: ;17 degrees
Dryness: -2
Amino acids: 1.7
Bottled in March 2020

Clarity: very clear
Color: faint golden hue
Aroma: discreet, dry fruity.
Green apple, flowers, pineapple

Tasting: Very fruity attack. Complex. Plums, raisins, flowers, almonds.
Very soft on the tongue in spite of its high alcohol contents. Stays longer on palate and tongue than usual. Finishes on a sweeter note with the appearance of melons.
Tends to turn drier with food with appearance of mikan, grapefruit and tamagoyaki.
Very complex, probably because of its nama/unpasteurized and muroka/unfiltered status.

Comments: very elegant, notwithstanding the fact it is nama genshu/unpasturized and no water blended.
Very easy to drink. Should please both genders at any time of afternoon or evening.
Might be best appreciated as a digetsif.

Recommended pairings: cheese, chocolate, marinated foods.

LA SOMMELIERE

420-0857 Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Miyuki Cho, 7-5, Aiseido Bldg, 1F
Tel. & Fax: 054-266-5085
Opening hours: 11:00~22:00, 12:00~18:00 on Sundays & National Holidays
FACEBOOK (Japanese)
Entirely non-smoking!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Shizuoka Shochu Tasting: Fuji takasago Brewery (Fujinomiya City) Coffee Spirits Takasago

Fuji Takasago Brewery in Fujinomiya City has for some time now venturing in making shochu out of the ordinary!

Their latest creation is anlend of fine rice lees and rice shochu and high quality coffee called Coffee spirits Takasago!

ingredients: rice shochu, rice lees shochu, coffee
Alcohol: 255
Contents: 500m
No 1302 (very limited edition!)

Tasting: strong and pleasant alcohol attack. beautiful dark black coffee.Roasted coffee beans, almost expresso coffee.
Alcohol pleasantly lingering on tongue and back of the mouth.
Tends to somewhat sweeten with the second sip.
lingers for a while before disappearing with a strong and pleasant dark coffee note at the back of the palate.
Strong and dry coffee attack with every new sip.

Comments: very dangerous shochu as it constantly invites/entices you to the next sip making you forget this is indeed a strong spirit!
Best appreciated on the rocks, but still very pleasant on its own at room temperature!
Easily becomes a bad habit. Can actually make for the perfct disgestif without a push coffee!

Recommended pairings: cheese, choclate, ice creams.

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Shizuoka Sake Tasting: Hatsukame Brewery (Okabe, Fujieda City) Daiginjo!

The other day I had the pleasure to be offered a bottle of rare and expensive sake by Hatsukame Brewery in Okabe, Fujieda City!
Hatsukame Daiginjo!

Rice: Yamada Nishiki (Hyogo Prefecture)
Rice milled down to 45%
Alcohol: 16 degrees
Dryness: +5
Amino acids: 1.3
Bottled in March 2019

Clarity: very clear
Color: very faint golden hue
Aroma: discreet, dry, fruity. Faint pineapple, vanilla, melon, traces of nuts.
Tasting: Dry and fruity attack with strong alcohol backup.
pineapple, vanilla.
Lingers longe rthan expected on the palate before disappearing on a drier note.
Very elusive and elegant.
takes on a drier note with food with the appearance of nuts while staying very dry and probably disappearing faster than when drunk on its own.

Comments: extravagant! The more for it that despite its very elevated status beautifully accompanies food, a rarity for daiginjo!
Constantly calls for another sip while staying silky smooth on the tongue and palate.
A dangerous feeling as it can be appreciated at any time away from or with food!
Makes for the perfect aperitif as well as a enticing nightcap!

Recommended pairings: although it should marry well with more foods and dishes than expected , I particularly appreciated it with tomato salad, oysters, cold pasta and steamed fish.

A hint! The drink to enjoy with the perfect companion or on your own away from it all!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

American Bar Restaurant: Lunch at Paradiso in Minato Yokocho, Mochimune, Shizuoka Ciy!

Minato Yokocho front!

Service: kind and attentive if a bit shy (at first!)
Equipment & facilities: overall very clean. Shared but very clean and complete washroom.
Prices: reasonable
Strong points: Great open hamburgers (“hambaagu” in Japanese!). Craft beers (although they tend to disappear quickly!)

Picture of the old Minato Yokocho!

Some time ago, CSA Real estate Co., actually based in Mochimune, among other projects took on to renew completely the old derelict Minato/harbor Yokocho/Alley to invite existing and new tenants to provide a much needed food and drinks site to the ever increasing number of tourists. Moreover, since bathers are rarer and rarer on the beach most shacks and bars have disappeared from the sea front it has become a natural spot to patronize as it caters for so many tastes and priorities!
I have already visited and written about a few places and will continue for some time!

This time I visited Paradiso!

Take your time and have a good look at the menu boards outside since it includes good pictures!
Lunch sets are a good bet and very reasonable!

Very simple but very clean settings including seats at tables and counter bar!

Craft beers on offer but they tend to change and disappear quickly! LOL
Night owls will find it very practical, too!

It was our first visit and that at lunch so we opted for almost the same set lunch!
Above is the Missus’ order: Wagyu (yes, you read it!) hambaaguu (Japanese style open hamburger)!
Ridiculously reasonable price at 1080 yen!

My own version!

But with two deep-fried prawns! For 1380 yen!

But don’t overlook the Kuroge/black hair wagyu gyusuji/tendon curry, the tako/octopus rice and fried food set lunch including prawns, oysters and fish! All accompanied with a small salad!

Can you guess what I will have next time? LOL

PARADISO

〒421-0122 shizuoka City, Suruga Ku, Mochimune, 2-17-2, inside Minato Yokocho
Tel.: 090-5038-3479
Opening hours: 11:00~12:00, 17:00~22:00, closed on Mondays
Credit cards ok

GOOGLE MAP

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery