Category Archives: Japanese Gastronomy

Oysters and Eels at Maisaka Maruma Kofukumaru in Maisaka, Hamamatsu City!

Car park for motorised visitors!

Service: shy but very welcoming and attentive
Equipment and facilities:
overall very clean if a bit rustic. Excellent washroom outside, better than expected considering their outlook.
Prices: reasonable
Strong points: top-class fresh oysters and eel! All local!

Entrance.

If you like oysters, especially fresh and eels, preferably local, Maisaka Maruma Kofukumaru (long name as they also add “Kakiya/Oyster Place” to it!) is the place!
A bit difficult to find, follow the Google Map link below for people who come by car. As for train travelers get off at Maisaka JR Station!

Mariners’ good luck charm?

The place!
It does not look much as it is owned by the local oyster and eel farmers!
Minimal decoration but scrumptious food!

The common toilets/washroom outside. Actually very clean and practical in spite of the rustic appearance!

If the place is busy (and it can be very busy on winter weekends!) a waiting room is there for you!

Very simple but very convivial!

Some customers do come after a long drive!

Interesting posters!

The official logos of the place!

Recommendations of the day!

More recommendations!

The menu, with photographs for better understanding!

Fresh oysters from nearby Hamana lake!

Actually steamed oysters are even better!

With authentic tradiitonal Japanese country food!

With light white miso and shellfish soup and Japanese pickles!

Mazegohan/mixed steamed rice!

Local eel lunch set!

Light broth soup and Japanese pickles!

Extremely reasonably priced local roiled eel on rice bowl!

Authentic. local, tasty and so healthy!
Definitely worth the long trip!

MAISAKA MARUMA KOFUKUMARU/舞阪マルマ 幸福丸

〒431-0211 Shizuoka Prefecture, hamamatsu City, Maisaka, 2621-114
Tel.: 053-592-2340
Opening hours: 10:00~16:00. Closed on Thursdays.
cash only

GOOGLE MAP
Access by train: get off at Maisaka JR Station.

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Tottori One Cup Sake Tasting 3: Chiyo Musubi Brewery-Gokuraku Oyaji Junmai/Junmai Ginjo

Tottori Prefecture is famed all over Japan for a manga called “Gegege no Kitaroo”, a story featuring all kinds of ghosts, whose first episode was pblished back on October 10th, 1967.
Although the prefecture is popular for many other reasons many a fan will visit the Prefecture to visit all the attractions based on that particular manga!

This particular one cup sake is part of a three cups set. This is the third one featuring Medama Oyaji One Eye Old Man, a frie3nd of Kitaroo, the main hero of the manga! He has the particularity to enjoy his baths inside a ramen bowl! Incidentally Gokuraku Oyaji means “Old Man having a great time”!

Rice milled down to 50%
Alcohol: 16 degrees
Bottled in December 2018

Color: light golden
Clarity : very clear
Aroma: strong and deep. Nuts, almonds.
Taste: smooth dry and woody attack warming up the palate with noticeable junmai petillant. Almost sweet almonds, dry oranges/mikan. Disappears after a while lingering on the palate.
Changes little with food but for deeper almonds and oranges.
Tends to sweeten again away from food.

Comments: solid, dependable sake.
Uncomplicated in spite of its elevated status. Very easy to drink. can be enjoyed with any type of meal or with light snacks.

Recommended pairings:: grilled meats, izakaya fare, cheese.

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Japanese Cakes/Wagashi for Vegans/Vegetarians 2: Recipe-Anko/Sweetmeats

WAGASHI-4

One main ingredients in traditional Wagashi/Japanese Cakes is “anko/餡子” (or more simply “an”) which can be translated as “sweetmeats” or “bean jam”.

Actually few people know that it was first conceived and made in a temple in Okitsu, Shimizu Ku, Shizuoka City!

I would like here to introduce a simple way to make one’s own “anko” at home:

INGREDIENTS:

Azuki/Adzuki/red beans (in Japanese: 小豆): 150 g
Sugar: 150g
Salt: a little

RECIPE:

a) Wash azuki lightly. Put in a large basin with an equal amount of water and turn on heat to high.

b) Bring to boil. If beans level is higher that of water, add water till beans are completely covered. Let simmer. Add water 2 or 3 times as soon as the water does not cover completely the beans and this until beans stop floating on water.

c) Drain beans, put them back into basin with same amount of water and turn fire to high. Repeat a) operation.

d) Cook as c) for 40~60 minutes.

e) Mash azuki beans lightly. Add sugar. Simmer and stir to mix, making sure the jam does not overboil.

f) Add a little salt (to your taste) and mix.
Let cool completely.
You can eat it as it is of course, but you will need it to make your cakes!
You can either sieve it to make it a very fine paste, sieve a part and mix it with the unsieved part, or use it as it is. In any case it will be easy to fashion!

WAGASHI-ANKO

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Japanese Cakes/Wagashi for Vegans/Vegetarians 1: Introduction

WAGASHI-1

There is a traditional way of making cakes in Japan that ought to please no end vegans, vegetarians and people allergic to wheat flour and dairy products, namely Wagashi!

Wagashi (和菓子) is a traditional Japanese confectionery which is often served with tea, especially the types made of mochi, azuki bean paste, and fruits.

Wagashi is typically made from naturally based (mainly plant) ingredients. The names used for wagashi commonly fit a formula—a natural beauty and a word from ancient literature; they are thus often written with hyōgaiji (kanji that are not commonly used or known), and are glossed with furigana (phonetic writing).

Generally, confectioneries that were introduced from the West after the Meiji Restoration (1868) are not considered wagashi. Most sorts of Okinawan confectionery and those originating in Europe or China that use ingredients alien to traditional Japanese cuisine, e.g., kasutera, are only rarely referred to as wagashi.

WAGASHI-2
Assortment of wagashi for a tea ceremony

During the Edo period, the production of sugarcane in Okinawa became highly productive, and low quality brown sugar as well as heavily processed white sugar became widely available. A type of sugar, wasanbon, was perfected in this period and is still used exclusively to make wagashi. Wagashi was a popular gift between samurai, in significance much like a good wine. Wagashi is served as part of a Japanese tea ceremony, and serving a good seasonal wagashi shows one’s educational background.

WAGASHI-3
Wagashi in the shape of rape flowers/Na no Hana

There are many, many kinds of Wagashi!
I will introduce them in the next postings, followed by other postings on the basic preparation.

WAGASHI-ABEKAWAMOCHI-2
Shizuoka’s Abekawa Mochi

Just know that about every region in Japan has its own traditional Wagashi!

Availability:
Wagashi is widely available in Japan, but quite rare outside it.
Minamoto Kitchoan (源 吉兆庵)
Has a varied selection, and stores in New York City (shipping throughout the US), London (shipping throughout Europe), and Singapore, in addition to Japan.
Toraya (とらや)
Has a full Paris store, stores in Japan, and sells a limited selection (yōkan only) at New York stores.
Fugetsu-do
Family owned and operated in the USA, since 1903, Fugetsu-do now ships anywhere in the USA.

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Tottori One Cup Sake Tasting 2: Chiyo Musubi Brewery-Nezumi Otoko Junmai/Junmai Ginjo

Tottori Prefecture is famed all over Japan for a manga called “Gegege no Kitaroo”, a story featuring all kinds of ghosts, whose first episode was pblished back on October 10th, 1967.
Although the prefecture is popular for many other reasons many a fan will visit the Prefecture to visit all the attractions based on that particular manga!

This particular one cup sake is part of a three cups set. This is the second one featuring Nezumi Otoko/Rat Man who happens to often antagonize Kitaroo, the main hero of the manga!

Rice milled down to 55%
Alcohol: 16.5 degrees
Bottled in Novemeber 2018

Clarity: very clear
Color: light golden
Aroma: discreet. Dry. Nuts, almonds, dry raisins.
Tasting: very dry attack. Fruity. Roasted nuts, chestnuts, raisins, dry ornages.
Disappears quickly enough warming up the palate with a lingering dry nuts note.
Changes little with food but for deeper nuts and late appearance of coffee nuts.along with deeper almonds.

Comments: Solid, reliable, uncomplicated sake with a very dry accent. Quite modest for a junmai ginjo. Easy to drink.
At its best during a meal, especially izkaya style.

Recommended pairings: cheese, oden, frilled fish, grilled shiitake, tamagoyaki.

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Shizuoka Izakaya: Dinner at Maru Ryou in Shimizu Ku, Shizuoka City!

The first starters!

Service: A bit shy but very kind and attentive
Equipment and Facilities: Overall very clean. Excellent washroom
Prices: reasonable
Strong Points: Authentic izakaya cuisine. Nice list of sake and shochu. Accent on local products, especially seasonal fish.

Superb set of local fish sashimi (part 1)!

Shimizu Ku (formerly Shimizu City before its merger with Shizuoka City) has of late been witnessing a revival of its old quarters, what with the new influx of tourists and the modernization of the access to its fishing harbor!
Get off at Shimizu JR Station, turn on the left, get down the stairs, walk on the left across a small street and continue until you find a long covered arcade on your left.
This has become the location for new izakayas, shops and bars!
You will find Maru Ryou/まる両 easily enough!

Superb set of local fish sashimi (part 2)!

I had the pleasure to discover the place thanks to a friend who happens to be a true local of this part of the city!
As we share a taste of good local food and drinks, I was sure to come to the right place!
They do have a nice list of local sake in particular, and you must try the fish as this is a major fishing town in the whole of Japan!

Fresh raw shirasu/sardine whiting, a local specialty!

As a true Japanese izakaya they will also offer all kinds of cooked various ways!
Deep-fried octopus!

Japanese chicken brochettes/yakitori!

Back to fish with another loala fish: aji tataki/horse mackerel tartare! unbeatable frshness!

A specialty of the place, a bit out the ordinary: Unagi tamago donburi/ eel and egg bowl!

And to beat the cold outside before going home: Ochazuke/rice tea soup!

Can’t to go there again, alone or in good company, whatever the time of the year!

MARU RYOU
424-0816 Shizuoka City, Shimizu Ku, Masago Cho, 2-18
Tel.: 054-364-2733
Opening hours: 16:00~21:00
Closed on Sundays
GOOGLE MAP

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Tottori One Cup Sake Tasting 1: Chiyo Musubi Brewery-Kitaroo Junmai/Junmai Ginjo

Tottori Prefecture is famed all over Japan for a manga called “Gegege no Kitaroo”, a story featuring all kinds of ghosts, whose first episode was pblished back on October 10th, 1967.
Although the prefecture is popular for many other reasons many a fan will visit the Prefecture to visit all the attractions based on that particular manga!

This particular one cup sake is part of a three cups set. This one is named Kitaroo from the main hero of the manga!

Rice milled down to 50%
Alcohol: 16 degrees
Bottled in Novemeber 2018.

Clarity: very clear
Color: light golden hue
Aroma: discreet, dry and fruity. plums, nuts.
Tasting: very dry and sharp attack. Plums, roasted nuts. Disappears slowly enough wit a strong impression left on the palate. Tastes almost like very dry sherry wit nuts added.
Changes little with food but for some petiillant on the tongue.

Comments: solid, uncompromising and uncomplcated sake to accompany heavy food , especially in winter.
Recommended pairings: potato salad, oden, grilled fish

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery