Tag Archives: Oysters

Japanese Gastronomy: Oysters steamed in Rice/Kaki Meshi Recipe

Winter means a large supply of fresh oyters in Japan and many other countries! But we certainly need some fresh and simple ideas to consume them, even if raw oysters are the norm.
Oyster chowder is a traditional option for example.
Have you heard of this typical Japanese dish called “Kaki Meshi/牡蠣飯, or oysters steamed in rice?
It has the advantage of being a hearty, simple and very healthy recipe.

Here is the basic recipe. There are plenty of options open for it!

INGREDIENTS: As I often do with basic Japanese recipes, I leave it to you as for exact quantities to accomodate personal preferences and priorities.

-Oysters/蠣
-Rice/米
-Soy sauce/醤油
-Japanese sake/酒
-Dashi/Japanese soup stock/出汁
-Grated daikon/大根おろし
-Ginger/生姜/cut into very fine strips
-Lime/yuzu/柚子/grated zest
-Thin leeks/子葱/コネギ
-Trefoil/Mitsuba/三葉

RECIPE:

Oysters:
Using fresh oysters in their shells (don’t forget to take them out!LOL) is a bit too extravagant for this recipe, and hard work.
In Japan they can be found in any markets sold packed in water. This country being very strict on hygiene rules, I have no problem using them.

Rice:
Prepare the rice before opening the pack of oysters.
3 “go”, or about 540 cc (liquid measure) should be enough. Use Japanese round rice. Check if it has to be washed first or not, as both varieties are available.
(After washing the rice, if necessary) let soak the rice in clear water for 30 minutes.
Drain thoroughly.

Massaging the oysters in grated daikon:
This is a very important step which will ensure that the oysters are properly cleaned.
Prepare enough grated daikon.
If you use oysters just taken out of their shells, massaging them with salt might be better.
Wash quickly under clear clean water and drain thoroughly.

Pre-cooking the oysters:
In pan pour just enough sake and soft soy sauce variety to simmer the the oysters in for 2~3 minutes.
The more sake, the better!
Do experiment!

Sieving/filter the juices:
Take oysters out with a sieve ladle and keep aside.
Strain/filter the juices into the rice cooker.

Preparing the rice steaming liquid/soup:
Add dashi/Japanese soup stock so that the total liquid is the equivalent of the rice volume x 1.2=about 650 cc.

Steaming:
Pour the rice into the steaming liquid.
Place oysters and ginger on top.
Close rice cooker and switch on.

Wait until the rice is cooked.
DO NOT OPEN the cooker at once, but leave it closed for 10 more minutes!
Open the cooker.
Drop in 90% of the chopped thin leeks, grated yuzu zest and cut trefoil.
Mix in quickly.
Serve at once sprinkled with some more thin leeks, grated yuzu and cut trefoil.

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Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India
Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London
Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Japanese Cuisine: Kaki Dotenabe-Oysters Pot-au-feu

The Japanese are not only great producers of oysters, they also come with some both delicious and simple ways to eat them that my friend Lou-Ann would definitely try!

The following recipe makes for a great pot-au feu or potluck in cold evenings! Ingredients can be easily varied according to the seasons and avaibility, although the oysters and tofu are a must!

Kaki Dotenabe/Oysters Pot-au-feu:

INGREDIENTS: For 5 people

-Oysters: 500 g (without the shells!LOL)
-Yaki tofu/grilled tofu: 1 large block~400 g
-Chinese cabbage: as appropriate
-Mizuna/trefoil or kikuna/edible chrysanthemum leaves: as appropriate
-White leek: 1
-Mushrooms of your choice: as appropriate
-Ito konnyaku/konnyaku vermicelli: 1 standard pack
-White miso paste: 300 g
-Red miso paste: 50 g
-Mirin/sweet sake: 5~6 tablespoons
-Dashi/soupstock: 4~5 cups/800~1000ml/cc

RECIPE:

-Drop the oysters in a bowl. Sprinkle them salt. massage them carefully. Clean under running cold water. Drain well.

-Cut the block of grilled tofu into 16 pieces.

-Clean the ito konnyaku/konnyuaku vermicelli under cold runnin water. Cut into 7~8 cm long bits.

-Cut all vegetables into the same size (Bite-size)

-In a bowl mix the two miso paste well. Add mirin and mix well again.
Line the inside of the pot with the miso paste mixture. Pour the dashi/soupstock in it and place over fire.

-First drop the vegetables and tofu inside the pot. The moment they are cooked add the oysters. The oysters should come in last, otherwise they will get hard.
Scoopthe food out of the pot into your own bowl with enough soup to enjoy the whole!

-Eat with chopsticks and Chinese spoon!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat

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Okonomiyaki with Oysters

Here is a simple recipe which should please <a href="Oyster Culture“>Lou-Ann who loves her oysters!

It will also help friends who are looking for new okonomiyaki recipes!

Okonomiyaki with Oysters!

INGREDIENTS: for 2 people?

-All-purpose flour: 2 cups/400 cc
-Water: 1/2 cup/50 cc
-Egg: 1
-Lotus root: 5 cm wide slice, peeled
-Cabbage: 2~3 leaves
-Leek: 1
-Oysters: 12 large (without the shells!)
-Salt & Pepper: as appropriate

-Sauce: of your choice: Worcester sauce, Bulldog sauce, BBQ sauce or a combination of soy sauce, Worcester sauce, bulldog sauce and mustard.

-Mayonnaise: as appropriate
-Chili pepper powder: as appropriate

RECIPE:

-In a large bowl mix the flour, egg and water well first.

-Grate the lotus root and add to the batter and mix.

-Cut the cabbage leaves and leeks in 5cm long strips. Add to batter and mix well.

-Pour oil in a large frypan. Heat the oil, then reduce fire to small. Drop 3:5 of the batter in frypan. Add the oysters (clean and thoroughl drained) on top.

-Cover the oysters with the remaining 2/5 of batter.

-Cook for 8 minutes. Do not pres on top!

-Turn over and cook for 5 more minutes.

-If you are not satisfied with the colour, cook for a little while more on both sides.

-Slide okonmiyaki onto a serving dish. Brush with plenty of sauce. Top with mayonnaise and chili pepper powder!

Great with beer!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille

Please check the new postings at:
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Italian Restaurant: Dinner at Contorno

Service: excellent and very friendly
Facilities: great washroom, great cleanliness overall
Prices: very reasonable, good value.
Strong points: Very fresh local ingredients extensively used.
no-smoking-logo1 All non-smoking!

Yesterday was Friday. The university having taken a day off before the final exams, there was no lecturing duty. The weather, although a bit chilly and windy, was absolutely glorious. I did not need more reasons to get away from that computer!
Contorno Italian Restaurant stands 5 minutes walk from Mochimune Station, 2 stops away from Shizuoka City.
It became a good opportunity to take a long 2-hour stroll on my own at my pace along the shore to work up an appetite!

I did show a bit early but the owner nonetheless invited me and opened the place for me.
I rewarded his hospitality by ordering a bottle and share it ith nad his sous-chef.

FALCHINI 2007, white, Vernaccha, Di San Gimignagno

Great golden colour.
Very clear and clean.
Aroma: Muscat and raisins.
Tasting: Solid attack.
Lingered longer on than expected.
Deep muscat and raisins.
Holds well with food.
Soft but solid on the palate. Memories of oak
Overall: Very honest, solid, well-balance white wine. Eminently drinkable with any food.
Melinda and Jen are going to kill with that kind of succinct tasting report!

As for the antipasto misti, I can already hear Lou-Ann and Frank scream in the distance!
Look at these fresh oysters! They are called Ako Kaki and they come all the way from Hyogo Prefecture (near Kobe City). They are small by Japanese standards, but I can garantee you they are a mouthful. Fat but vey firm, just perfect. Notice the edible fresh seaweeds around them. These disappeared quickly, too!
The rillettes (pork) are of course home-made.
That with the Parma ham, semi-dried tomato and black olives and my appetite was really sharpened (as we say in French)!

I din’t bother looking at the menu and consulted the small blackboard on which were chalk-written the recommendations of the day.
I first opted for the Duck Breast Roast.
Served with a solid and delicious sauce made red wine and fond de veau, the duck was raosted to perfection, red and soft inside.
As for the vegetables, including yellow, red pimentoes, kabocha, brocoli, carrot, rape plant, sweet potato, string beans and red daikon, they were all organically grown in Fujinomiya City at the foot of Mount Fuji!

But my eyes (and stomach!) had noticed something else which urged me to check the blackboard again after I had finished the duck:
Shungiku Risotto Kaki Soroe: “Shungiku” is a variety of chrysanthemum grown for its edible leaves, “kaki” means “oyster” and “sore” means “topped with”.

One enormous sauteed Ako Oyster on top of the risotto (sorry for the fuzzy picture, butI was desperate!)!
Perfectly balanced risotto, sublime simplicity and that oyster again!
Italian Cuisine with Japanese finesse!

And the dessert!
Shizuoka (Most famous area for strawberries in Japan!) straberry tart conceived on a marzipan base. A real red fruit sauce concocted with red wine, fruit coulis, lemon juice and real red fruit.
Once again sublime simplicity, great balance and perfect volume!

I will have a hard time explaining the Missus what I wa doing in Mochimune! LOL

CONTORNO
421-0122, Shizuoka City, Suruga Ku, Mochimune, 5-1-10, Sunrise Mochimune (5 minutes walk from Mochimune JR Station. Second stop after Shizuoka)
Tel.: 054-2565877
Business hours: 11:30~14:30, 17:00~21:30
Closed on Wednesdays

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Bread + Butter, Comestilblog, Greedy Girl, Bouchon For 2, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Mangantayon, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles, Lexi, Culinary Musings, Eats and Everything, Bite Me New England, Heather Sweet, Warren Bobrow, 5 Star Foodie, Frank Fariello, Oyster Culture, Ramendo, Alchemist Chef, Ochikeron, Mrs. Lavendula, The Gipsy Chef, Spirited Miu Flavor, Wheeling Gourmet, Chef de Plunge, Sushi Nomads, Island Vittles, The French Market Maven

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi,
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日本語のブログ
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Japanese Cuisine: Oysters steamed in Rice/Kaki Meshi

Winter means a large supply of fresh oyters in Japan and many other countries! But we certainly need some fresh and simple ideas to consume them, even if raw oysters are the norm.
Oyster chowder is a traditionla option for example.
Have you heard of this typical Japanese dish called “Kaki Meshi/牡蠣飯, or oysters steamed in rice?
It has the advantage of beiing a hearty, simple and very healthy recipe.

Here is the basic recipe. There are plenty of options open for it!

INGREDIENTS: As I often do with basic Japanese recipes, I leave it to you as for exact quantities to accomodate personal preferences and priorities.

-Oysters/蠣
-Rice/米
-Soy sauce/醤油
-Japanese sake/酒
-Dashi/Japanese soup stock/出汁
-Grated daikon/大根おろし
-Ginger/生姜/cut into very fine strips
-Lime/yuzu/柚子/grated zest
-Thin leeks/子葱/コネギ
-Trefoil/Mitsuba/三葉

RECIPE:

Oysters:
Using fresh oysters in their shells (don’t forget to take them out!LOL) is a bit too extravagant for this recipe, and hard work.
In Japan they can be found in any markets sold packed in water. This country being very strict on hygiene rules, I have no problem using them.

Rice:
Prepare the rice before opening the pack of oysters.
3 “go”, or about 540 cc (liquid measure) should be enough. Use Japanese round rice. Check if it has to be washed first or not, as both varieties are available.
(After washed the rice, if necessary) let soak the rice in clear water for 30 minutes.
Drain thoroughly.

Massaging the oyters in grated daikon:
This is a very important step which will ensure that the oysters are properly cleaned.
Prepare enough grated daikon.
If you use oysters just taken out of their shells, massaging them with salt might be better.
Wash quickly under clear clean water and drain thoroughly.

Pre-cooking the oysters:
In pan pour just enough sake and soft soy sauce variety to simmer the the oysters in for 2~3 minutes.
The more sake, the better!
Do experiment!

Sieving/filter the juices:
Take oysters out with a sieve ladle and keep aside.
Strain/filter the juices into the rice cooker.

Preparing the rice steaming liquid/soup:
Add dashi/Japanese soup stock so that the total liquid is the equivalent of the rice volume x 1.2=about 650 cc.

Steaming:
Pour the rice into the steaming liquid.
Place oysters and ginger on top.
Close rice cooker and switch on.

Wait until the rice is cooked.
DO NOT OPEN the cooker at once, but leave it closed for 10 more minutes!
Open the cooker.
Drop in 90% of thechopped thin leeks, grated yuzu zest and cut trefoil.
Mix in quickly.
Serve at once sprinkled with some more thin leeks, grated yuzu and cut trefoil.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Bread + Butter, Comestilblog, Greedy Girl, Bouchon For 2, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Mangantayon, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles, Lexi, Culinary Musings, Eats and Everything, Bite Me New England, Heather Sweet, Warren Bobrow, 5 Star Foodie, Frank Fariello, Oyster Culture, Ramendo, Alchemist Chef, Ochikeron, Mrs. Lavendula, The Gipsy Chef, Spirited Miu Flavor, Wheeling Gourmet, Chef de Plunge, Sushi Nomads, Island Vittles, The French Market Maven

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi,
—————————————-
日本語のブログ
—————————————-

Shellfish Species 3: Oysters/Kaki

Oysters! One would be hard put to find a produce from the sea more internationally recognized as a gourmet’s choice! Moreover, it is the only shellfish you coul survive on if you get marrooned on a desert island! It is a complete food in irself if consumed raw.
For a long time (that is before coming to Japan), I had thought that my country, France, was the place to eat them. Well, I must admit it was a little pretentious from me, especially in the light that more than half of the oysters consumed back at home originated from Japan!

Now the Japanese has come with many ways of appreciating them:
-As in the picture above they would eat them as sashimi with a dash of wasabi and soy sauce.

-Or just a little lemon juice as in Euope, Americas or Oceania.

-Or in another japanese fashion, with ponzu and momijioroshi (succulent!)

-Or, and here Japanese and foreigners are simply crazy about them, as “kakifrai”, deep-fried oysters in batter and breadcrumbs with a nice tartare sauce!

-Or finally, and I would recommend the experience to all foreigners, as “kaki-gohan”, either with oysters steamed together with the rice, or cooked apart in light broth poured over a bowl of freshly steamed rice!

Of course, any good sushi restaurants will serve oysters as nigiri or gunkan!

In Japan, oysters come from various areas, mainly Hiroshima, Iwate and so on.
As for Shizuoka Prefecture, oysters mainly come from Hamanako inland sallted lake near Hamamatsu City.

————————-
Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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日本語のブログ
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Japanese Oysters


The Japan Blog List

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

—————————————-

Oysters! One would be hard put to find a produce from the sea more internationally recognized as a gourmet’s choice! Moreover, it is the only shellfish you could survive on if you get marrooned on a desert island! It is a complete food in irself if consumed raw.
For a long time (that is before coming to Japan), I had thought that my country, France, was the place to eat them. Well, I must admit that it was a little pretentious from me, especially in the light that more than half of the oysters consumed back at home originated from Japan!

Now the Japanese have come with many ways of appreciating them:
-As in the picture above they would eat them as sashimi with a dash of wasabi and soy sauce.

-Or just a little lemon juice as in Europe, Americas or Oceania.

-Or in another Japanese fashion, with ponzu and momijioroshi (fresh grated daikon mixed with chili pepper. Succulent!)

-Or, and here Japanese and foreigners are simply crazy about them, as “kakifrai”, deep-fried oysters in batter and breadcrumbs with a nice tartare sauce!

-Or finally, and I would recommend the experience to all foreigners, as “kaki-gohan”, either with oysters steamed together with the rice, or cooked apart in light broth poured over a bowl of freshly steamed rice!

kaki-nigiri kakigunkan

Of course, any good sushi restaurants will serve oysters as nigiri or gunkan!

In Japan, oysters come from various areas, mainly Hiroshima, Iwate and so on.
As for Shizuoka Prefecture, oysters mainly come from Hamanako inland salted lake near Hamamatsu City.