Vegan Japanese Tomato Turnips

For too long, turnips have been considered food for the poor and destitutes.
In France it is also the symbol of a bad play or movie!
Actually they make for great vegetables, cheap and easy to cook!

Here is a very simple recipe with simple cheap ingredients for “poor” vegans.
Great for kids, too!

INGREDIENTS: 1 person?

-Turnips: 2 (organic!)
-Onion: half 1 (organic!)
-Aburaage/fried tofu: 1 (sliced into 5 cm long thin strips)
-Olive oil: for frying
-Tomato juice (organic, please, or makeyour own!): 300 cc/ml
-Salt: 1 teaspoon (can be reduced, especially for kids!)
-Ground black pepper: to taste

RECIPE:

1 Cut turnips into wedges. Slice the onions thin.

2 Pour some olive oil in a fry pan. Fry sliced turnips, onions and aburaage, bearing in mind turnips become soft very quickly.

3 After frying on a medium fire for about 3 minutes, add tomato juice, salt and simmer for about 8 minutes on a low fire.
If and when the turnips are cooked, switch off fire and sprinkle with ground black pepper.

Simple, isn’t it? The point is to stew/simmer the vegetables in tomato juice. Aburaage will provide some bite!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless MamaFrank Fariello, , Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon

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Oshizushi/Pressed Sushi Techniques 3: Egg Bearing Snow Crab/Seikogani

SYNOPSIS:

Sushi exists under many forms and guises.
It is not all nigiri and (more ubiquitous) sushi rolls!
Have you ever heard of Oshizushi?

Oshizushi (押し寿司, litterally pressed sushi), is a pressed sushi from the Kansai Region, a favourite and specialty of Osaka.

Oshibako unmounted

It is made with the help of a block-shaped piece formed using a wooden mold, called an oshibako/押し箱.

Oshibako lined with toppings

The chef lines the bottom of the oshibako with the toppings, covers them with sushi rice, and then presses the lid of the mold down to create a compact, rectilinear block.

Cutting Grilled Eel Oshizushi

The block is then removed from the mold and then cut into bite-sized pieces.

It is great fun to experiment at home for large parties or the family as you can include almost anything.
Moreover, oshizuhi is easy to transport and include in bento!

The recipes and techniques I’m introducing here are professional, but with a little practice I’m sure you will become a specialist

1)Salmon Marinated in Seaweed/Sake Sushi Konbushime, 2) Seared Prime Beef/Gyuniku Aburi

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Egg Bearing Snow Crab/Seikogani

Snow Crab/Zuwagani

Seikogani is the Japanese name for the female Snow Crab or Zuwagani, when she is bearing her eggs.
Contrary to many other kinds of crabs, the female snow crabs, even when bearing eggs, lose little of their food and taste quality with the added advantage of an extra delicacy and taste. On the other hand the main food is found inside the shell instead of the legs and pincers for the males.
Therefore, if you get your hands on such a specimen, do not ignore it, even if they are noticeably smaller than their male counterparts!

Boiled snow crabs.

The best is actually to combine both male and female into a combination sushi.

Above are the shells of two snow crabs, the large male one containing white flesh and red brains from both male and female, the smaller female one containing the eggs, and the flesh taken out of the male legs after boiling and cooling.

See above picture for better view of the edible morsels: white flesh, red brains (don’t forget these!) and eggs.

As there is a danger of a general crumbling out of the ingredients, line the bottom of the oshibako/box with a good layer of light seaweed first instead of doing it after you have unloose the sushi out ofits box.
Then place legs flesh tightly parallel to each other to form as compact as possible layer. Cover the leg flesh with the eggs and red brains into a pleasing design.
Finally fill with sushi rice and press.

Unloose sushi from its box and cut to size before serving!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Sushi Nomads, Oyster Culture

Please check the new postings at:
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Japanese Vegan Avocado Pudding

The same as for shakes, vegans should not worry about ingredients when making a pudding!

Here is a very simple way to make a healthy appetizer the Japanese way!

Japanese Vegan Avocado Pudding!

INGREDIENTS: For 3~4 people

-Agar agar: 2~4 g (depending how solid you like your pudding!)
-Tofu (kinu/silk tofu): 1 standard portion~400 g
-Avocado: 1 ripe
-Very fine salt, ground white pepper: to taste and according to preferences
-Spices: if preferred

RECIPE:

-Mix the agar agar in a little water.

-In a pan drop the tofu and agar agar. Heat over a medium fire and stir into smooth paste. As soon as the agar agar has dissolved into the tofu. Switch off fire and take away the pan from the fire.

-Drop the tofu inside a food processor. Add the avocado cut into rough pieces and seasoning, and process until smooth.

-Pour the mixture inside lightly oiled molds. Let cool completely and leave inside refrigerator to chill and harden.

Great with wasabi dressing, or ponzu!
If you like your pudding solid, pour it into a rectangular mold and cut it in slices like sashimi!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless MamaFrank Fariello, , Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon

Please check the new postings at:
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Vegan & Avocado & Banana Shake

I wonder if there is a country where one cannot find some kind of shake!
But, they use ice-cream and dairy products to make them!

Well, there is a simple way to make them vegan!
How about this one:

Vegan & Avocado & Banana Shake!

INGREDIENTS: For 2 people
-Avocado: 1/2 ripe
-Soy milk: 200 cc/ml
-Banana: 1
-Lemon juice: 1 reaspoon
-Honey (liquid): 2 teaspoons
-Mint leaves: for decoration.

RECIPE:

-Leave banana and avacado in refrigeartor long enough to get them really chilled.

-Cut avocado and banana in small enough pieces.

-Put everything into blender and mix well.

-Pour in glasses and serve topped with mint leaves.

How simpler can you make it? LOL

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless MamaFrank Fariello, , Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Oshizushi/Pressed Sushi Techniques 2: Seared Prime Beef/Gyuniku Aburi

SYNOPSIS:

Sushi exists under many forms and guises.
It is not all nigiri and (more ubiquitous) sushi rolls!
Have you ever heard of Oshizushi?

Oshizushi (押し寿司, litterally pressed sushi), is a pressed sushi from the Kansai Region, a favourite and specialty of Osaka.

Oshibako unmounted

It is made with the help of a block-shaped piece formed using a wooden mold, called an oshibako/押し箱.

Oshibako lined with toppings

The chef lines the bottom of the oshibako with the toppings, covers them with sushi rice, and then presses the lid of the mold down to create a compact, rectilinear block.

Cutting Grilled Eel Oshizushi

The block is then removed from the mold and then cut into bite-sized pieces.

It is great fun to experiment at home for large parties or the family as you can include almost anything.
Moreover, oshizuhi is easy to transport and include in bento!

The recipes and techniques I’m introducing here are professional, but with a little practice I’m sure you will become a specialist

1)Salmon Marinated in Seaweed/Sake Sushi Konbushime

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Japanese prime beef has become a registered trademark all over the world be it from Kobe or other regions.
The present sushi was made with “Kuroge Gyuniku/黒毛牛肉/Black Hair Beef from animals raised to the age of 12 months in Fukui Prefecture.
Do check the origin of your beef!

When preparing this slightly extravagant sushi, choose a large slice of prime beef with plenty of “fat veins” as shown on the above picture.
Don’t choose too thick or too thin, either. Think of the proportion of the beef and rice. Bear in mind that the the seared beef will also loose some of its thickness.

Sprinkle the beef with quality ground balck pepper and salt.
Sear it or grill it lightly on both sides quickly.
This process will enhance the sweetness of the meat.

-Slice the meat into bite-sized portions as shown in above picture at a slant after having cut off the fatty extremity.

Lay the bottom of the oshibako/box with slices of beef as shown in above picture in a “staggering” fashion. If you don’t, the slices will slideaway from each other.
Cover with shiso/perilla leaves.
Cover with sushi rice and press.

Soften light seaweed in lukewarm water and spread it over a clean cloth.
Unloose the sushi out of its box.
The beef should be on top.
Spread the light seaweed over the top.
Cut to size and serve immediately for maximum enjoyment!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Sushi Nomads, Oyster Culture

Please check the new postings at:
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Taro & Macha Steamed Pound Cake

Still in my Taro/Sato Imo mood, aren’t I?
Today I would like to introduce a really simple pound cake recipe which includes taro and macha tea powder!

Taro & Macha Steamed Pound Cake!

INGREDIENTS:

-Taro/Sato imo: 200 g (peeled)
-Egg white: 1
-Sugar: 60 g
-Salt: 1/2 teaspoon
-Egg yolk: 1
-Flour: 2 teaspoons
-Water (as much as needed)
-Macha tea powder: 1/2 teaspoon
-Lime peel/zest: half a lime (finely chopped)

RECIPE:

1-Cut the taro into practical-sized pieces and boil.
Drain them thoroughly and mash into a smooth paste.

2-Beat into solid meringue the egg white, 2/3 of the sugar and the salt.

3-Add the rest (1/3) of the sugar to the mashed taro/sato imo, egg yolk and flour. Mix well. If the mixture proves a bit hard to mix, add water little by little until staifaction.

4-Add the meringue to the taro/satoimo and mix well.

5-Add the finely chopped lime zest and mix.
Pour one half into a pound cake mold lined with kitchen paper.
Add macha tea powder to the rest, mix and pour on top of the bottom layer.

6-Steam over a strong fire for 25 minutes.
Check if cooked properly by stabbing the cake with a thin wooden skewer. It should come out clean. Switch off fire and let cool down completely

Makes for a very light and healthy dessert!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon

Please check the new postings at:
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Vegan Japanese Cuisine: Taro & Bamboo Shoots in Sweet and Hot Miso

Not ready yet to give up on those simple and healthy recipes with taro, or sato imo/里芋 as they are called in Japan that should please my vegan and vegetarian friends (omnivore friends, just be a little more patient!)!

This one is called “Taro & Bamboo Shoots in Sweet and Hot Miso/里芋と竹の子の甘辛味噌煮”, or Sato Imo to Take no Ko no Amakara Miso Ni”
It is another very simple dish that should provide food with a filling sensation to vegans.

INGREDIENTS: For 2 people

-Taro/Sato imo: 3~4 middle-sized specimens
-Bamboo shoots: 1 cup (cut to size. Canned Bamboo Shoots are fine)
-Konnyaku/Devil’s Tongur Tuber: 2/3 cup (cut to size. Canned specimen are fine)
-Japanese sake: 1 tablespoon
-Mirin/Sweet sake: 1 tablespoon
-Konbu/seaweed dashi/Soup stock: enough to submerge all ingredients upon cooking
-Salt: a pinch
-Salad oil: 1 tablespoon
-Sweet Miso (red miso base): 1 tablespoon
-Yuzu koshio/Lime & Chili Pepper Paste: to taste

RECIPE:

-Peel taro/sato imo and cut into bite-sized pieces. Cut bamboo shoots in approximately size (if needed). Cut the konnyaku/devil’s tongue tuber in slightly smaller pieces.

-Boil the Taro/sato imo a little beforehand to soften them.

-In a pan drop the half cooked taro/stao imo, bamboo shoots and konnyaku. Pour dashi until dashi until it had submerged everything.
Switch on fire.

-Add sake, mirin and salt and bring to boil. Lower fire to low~medium and simmer/stew until soup/stock has disappeared.

-Once the soup has disappeared, a frying sound will be heard. At that moment add the oil and stir fry the lot.

-Once the oil has coated everything, add the miso and mix gently as the taro will be soft by then.

-Add the yuzu koshio/Lime and chili pepper mix just before serving.

NOTES:

-For variation you may use chopped lime skin/zest or/and hot chili powder

Easy once again!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless MamaFrank Fariello, , Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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日本語のブログ
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