Tag Archives: Japanese Gastronomy

Oysters and Eels at Maisaka Maruma Kofukumaru in Maisaka, Hamamatsu City!

Car park for motorised visitors!

Service: shy but very welcoming and attentive
Equipment and facilities:
overall very clean if a bit rustic. Excellent washroom outside, better than expected considering their outlook.
Prices: reasonable
Strong points: top-class fresh oysters and eel! All local!

Entrance.

If you like oysters, especially fresh and eels, preferably local, Maisaka Maruma Kofukumaru (long name as they also add “Kakiya/Oyster Place” to it!) is the place!
A bit difficult to find, follow the Google Map link below for people who come by car. As for train travelers get off at Maisaka JR Station!

Mariners’ good luck charm?

The place!
It does not look much as it is owned by the local oyster and eel farmers!
Minimal decoration but scrumptious food!

The common toilets/washroom outside. Actually very clean and practical in spite of the rustic appearance!

If the place is busy (and it can be very busy on winter weekends!) a waiting room is there for you!

Very simple but very convivial!

Some customers do come after a long drive!

Interesting posters!

The official logos of the place!

Recommendations of the day!

More recommendations!

The menu, with photographs for better understanding!

Fresh oysters from nearby Hamana lake!

Actually steamed oysters are even better!

With authentic tradiitonal Japanese country food!

With light white miso and shellfish soup and Japanese pickles!

Mazegohan/mixed steamed rice!

Local eel lunch set!

Light broth soup and Japanese pickles!

Extremely reasonably priced local roiled eel on rice bowl!

Authentic. local, tasty and so healthy!
Definitely worth the long trip!

MAISAKA MARUMA KOFUKUMARU/舞阪マルマ 幸福丸

〒431-0211 Shizuoka Prefecture, hamamatsu City, Maisaka, 2621-114
Tel.: 053-592-2340
Opening hours: 10:00~16:00. Closed on Thursdays.
cash only

GOOGLE MAP
Access by train: get off at Maisaka JR Station.

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Japanese Cakes/Wagashi for Vegans/Vegetarians 2: Recipe-Anko/Sweetmeats

WAGASHI-4

One main ingredients in traditional Wagashi/Japanese Cakes is “anko/餡子” (or more simply “an”) which can be translated as “sweetmeats” or “bean jam”.

Actually few people know that it was first conceived and made in a temple in Okitsu, Shimizu Ku, Shizuoka City!

I would like here to introduce a simple way to make one’s own “anko” at home:

INGREDIENTS:

Azuki/Adzuki/red beans (in Japanese: 小豆): 150 g
Sugar: 150g
Salt: a little

RECIPE:

a) Wash azuki lightly. Put in a large basin with an equal amount of water and turn on heat to high.

b) Bring to boil. If beans level is higher that of water, add water till beans are completely covered. Let simmer. Add water 2 or 3 times as soon as the water does not cover completely the beans and this until beans stop floating on water.

c) Drain beans, put them back into basin with same amount of water and turn fire to high. Repeat a) operation.

d) Cook as c) for 40~60 minutes.

e) Mash azuki beans lightly. Add sugar. Simmer and stir to mix, making sure the jam does not overboil.

f) Add a little salt (to your taste) and mix.
Let cool completely.
You can eat it as it is of course, but you will need it to make your cakes!
You can either sieve it to make it a very fine paste, sieve a part and mix it with the unsieved part, or use it as it is. In any case it will be easy to fashion!

WAGASHI-ANKO

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Japanese Cakes/Wagashi for Vegans/Vegetarians 1: Introduction

WAGASHI-1

There is a traditional way of making cakes in Japan that ought to please no end vegans, vegetarians and people allergic to wheat flour and dairy products, namely Wagashi!

Wagashi (和菓子) is a traditional Japanese confectionery which is often served with tea, especially the types made of mochi, azuki bean paste, and fruits.

Wagashi is typically made from naturally based (mainly plant) ingredients. The names used for wagashi commonly fit a formula—a natural beauty and a word from ancient literature; they are thus often written with hyōgaiji (kanji that are not commonly used or known), and are glossed with furigana (phonetic writing).

Generally, confectioneries that were introduced from the West after the Meiji Restoration (1868) are not considered wagashi. Most sorts of Okinawan confectionery and those originating in Europe or China that use ingredients alien to traditional Japanese cuisine, e.g., kasutera, are only rarely referred to as wagashi.

WAGASHI-2
Assortment of wagashi for a tea ceremony

During the Edo period, the production of sugarcane in Okinawa became highly productive, and low quality brown sugar as well as heavily processed white sugar became widely available. A type of sugar, wasanbon, was perfected in this period and is still used exclusively to make wagashi. Wagashi was a popular gift between samurai, in significance much like a good wine. Wagashi is served as part of a Japanese tea ceremony, and serving a good seasonal wagashi shows one’s educational background.

WAGASHI-3
Wagashi in the shape of rape flowers/Na no Hana

There are many, many kinds of Wagashi!
I will introduce them in the next postings, followed by other postings on the basic preparation.

WAGASHI-ABEKAWAMOCHI-2
Shizuoka’s Abekawa Mochi

Just know that about every region in Japan has its own traditional Wagashi!

Availability:
Wagashi is widely available in Japan, but quite rare outside it.
Minamoto Kitchoan (源 吉兆庵)
Has a varied selection, and stores in New York City (shipping throughout the US), London (shipping throughout Europe), and Singapore, in addition to Japan.
Toraya (とらや)
Has a full Paris store, stores in Japan, and sells a limited selection (yōkan only) at New York stores.
Fugetsu-do
Family owned and operated in the USA, since 1903, Fugetsu-do now ships anywhere in the USA.

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Tottori One Cup Sake Tasting 2: Chiyo Musubi Brewery-Nezumi Otoko Junmai/Junmai Ginjo

Tottori Prefecture is famed all over Japan for a manga called “Gegege no Kitaroo”, a story featuring all kinds of ghosts, whose first episode was pblished back on October 10th, 1967.
Although the prefecture is popular for many other reasons many a fan will visit the Prefecture to visit all the attractions based on that particular manga!

This particular one cup sake is part of a three cups set. This is the second one featuring Nezumi Otoko/Rat Man who happens to often antagonize Kitaroo, the main hero of the manga!

Rice milled down to 55%
Alcohol: 16.5 degrees
Bottled in Novemeber 2018

Clarity: very clear
Color: light golden
Aroma: discreet. Dry. Nuts, almonds, dry raisins.
Tasting: very dry attack. Fruity. Roasted nuts, chestnuts, raisins, dry ornages.
Disappears quickly enough warming up the palate with a lingering dry nuts note.
Changes little with food but for deeper nuts and late appearance of coffee nuts.along with deeper almonds.

Comments: Solid, reliable, uncomplicated sake with a very dry accent. Quite modest for a junmai ginjo. Easy to drink.
At its best during a meal, especially izkaya style.

Recommended pairings: cheese, oden, frilled fish, grilled shiitake, tamagoyaki.

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Tottori One Cup Sake Tasting 1: Chiyo Musubi Brewery-Kitaroo Junmai/Junmai Ginjo

Tottori Prefecture is famed all over Japan for a manga called “Gegege no Kitaroo”, a story featuring all kinds of ghosts, whose first episode was pblished back on October 10th, 1967.
Although the prefecture is popular for many other reasons many a fan will visit the Prefecture to visit all the attractions based on that particular manga!

This particular one cup sake is part of a three cups set. This one is named Kitaroo from the main hero of the manga!

Rice milled down to 50%
Alcohol: 16 degrees
Bottled in Novemeber 2018.

Clarity: very clear
Color: light golden hue
Aroma: discreet, dry and fruity. plums, nuts.
Tasting: very dry and sharp attack. Plums, roasted nuts. Disappears slowly enough wit a strong impression left on the palate. Tastes almost like very dry sherry wit nuts added.
Changes little with food but for some petiillant on the tongue.

Comments: solid, uncompromising and uncomplcated sake to accompany heavy food , especially in winter.
Recommended pairings: potato salad, oden, grilled fish

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Soba, Tempura & Local Products at Yuriyama in Ikumi, Shimada City, Shizuoka Prefecture!

Service: Shy but very kind and attentive
Equipment: Overall very clean. excellent washroom
Prices: Reasonable
Strong points: Home-made soba/buckwheta noodles, tempura, and local farmers’ products

The other day a good friend of mine, Mayumi, owner of the Flower Shop Pepiement in Shimada City, was kind enough to drive (look at bus access below) drive me to an authentic local farmers restaurant and shop called Yamayuri/Mountain Lily up the road leading to Ikumi in the northern part of Shimada City. I already had the occasion to use this same bus twice up to its final stop and I would definitely suggest anyone to take and discover the true back country of japan with all kind of quaint sites!

The shop alone is worth the trip!
Better come early to pick the best choice of local seasonal vegetables and fruit!

And don’t miss all the home-made jams, preserves, pickles and discover the tastes of real rural Japan!

The restaurant is just left past the entrance!

Place the orders before entering the restaurant! Even you do not understand Japanese the menus are explained with pictures. Just point and pay beforehaand!

The local vegetables used in the dishes of the day!

The restaurant includes a soba classroom!
Even if you only wish to eat there taking pictures is welcome!

More pictures depicting the activities of the day inside the restaurant!

Hot soba!
Of course the soba are made afresh every day!

Cold soba!

I could not resist their gyoza!
Actually excellent and light and tasty!

Cold soba mounted with fresh hot tempura!

The tempura might look rough (don’t forget this farmer’s wife cooking!) but you can’t beat the taste of fresh local vegetables! A delicacy for vegetarians!

If you have a day off do combine the restaurant and shop with a slow trip in the midst of rural Japan!

Address: 427-0232 Shizuoka Prefefecture, Shimada City, Ikumi, 5202 (access by car or Ikumi Sem Midosawa Yuki/伊久身線御堂沢行き community bus line every hour from Shimada Station north exit. Get off at Yamayuri/やまゆり bus stop. First bus leaving at 7:00, last at 20:00, return bus first at 6:14, last at 18:54. Count 40 minutes trip. Only 8 buses a day!)
Tel.: 0547-39-0193
Opening hours: 10:00~16:00 (better check on the phone first!)
Closed on Thursdays and Fridays (open on Fridays in August)
Soba/Buckwheat noodles preparation classes, Table BBQ, Ground Golf, Farmer’s wife cooking class, etc.
GOOGLE MAP
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)
FACEBOOK
CHECK IKUMI’S FACEBOOK!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Hokkaido One Cup Sake Tasting 1: Nihon Seishu Brewery Chitose Branch-Chitosetsuru Hakodate Gagyuzan

i found this one cup sake the other day during my visit in Hakodate, Hokkaido Island!

Although this label is usually sold in Hakodate only the Brewery is actually from Sapporo, namely the Nihon Seishu Brewery but this particular brand, ChitoseTsuru is brewed in their branch brewery in Chitose, not far from the Chitose International airport!

The label depicts Gyaguzan, one of the most, if not most famous night view in Hakodate City!

Rice: various rice from Japan
Dryness: + 1
Acidity: 1.3
Alcohol: 15~16 degrees
Bottled in June 2019

Clarity: very clear
Color: light golden hue
Aroma: strong. plums
Body: fluid
Taste: dry and smooth attack. Drier than expected. Plums, persimmons, nuts. Lingers for a while on the tongue and palate Does not noticeably change with food but for a little more acidity. Tends to finish on drier note.
Overall: Straightforward sake. Not a premium but quite enjoyable actually if you like solid uncomplicaed brews.
Recommended pairings: Izakaya fare, heavy foods, BBQ, grilled fish.

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Italian/French Gastronomy: Dinner at Kuraya Kato in Mochimune, Shizuoka City!

Service: Shy but very kind and attentive
Equipment and facilities: Overall extremely clean. Superb washroom. Entirely non-smoking
Prices: reasonable
Strong points: superlative Italian/cuisine making use of many local products!
Short but excellent wine lists at reasonable prices.

The name Kuraya Kato means that the restaurant was created by his owner/che3f, Mr. Kato, inside an ancient “kura/Japanese storehouse”, probably one of the biggest still existing in Shizuoka Prefecture!
It is actually of rare dimensions and the inside is simply spacious and beautifully redecorated conserving as much its original cachet as possible with all amenities, all wood and white walls. A very special place whose atmosphere is enough to invite you ther anytime. But the cuisine is simply extravagant, although at very reasonable prices!

Great attention to the olive oil and butter!
The table service is beautiful in its seemingly simplicity and helps you relax from the very moment you sit down at your table.
Bear in mind that all meals must be reserved in advance, but the place will open even for a single guest!

So comfortable in soft light surrounded by real wood!

A lot of attention attached to small details, making the difference!
Menus (to be decided on the phone or else while reserving) are based on full courses at varying prices. We opted for the 6,000 yen dinner, but you can require for more, citing your likes or dislikes!

Since Mochimune is a noted fishing harbor famous all over Japan expect some great fish for the starters!

Excellent sparkling wine for the occasion!

All bread is baked onsite!

Second starters!

Beautiful and elegant pasta (remember it is a starter back in Italy!)!

Unusual, reasonable and delicious red wine!

More home-baked bread!

First main dish: Shizuoka seabream sauteed with basil sauce, Italian style!

Second main dish: Shizuoka wagyu steak! No need to comment!

Beautiful classic dessert assortment combining French and Italian cuisines!

And coffee served as it should be!

Definitely among the very best in Shizuoka Prefecture!

KURAYA KATO
421-0122, Shizuoka City, Suruga Ku, Mochimune, 3-5-33 (ten minutes walk from Mochimune JR Station
Tel. 054-260-44959
HOMEPAGE
Lunches o reservations only only 11:00 am on the day
Dinners on reservations only minimum 24 hours in advance
Credit cards ok

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Dinner at Numazu Uogashi Nagare Sushi, Shizuoka Parche Restaurant

Service: Shy but kind and attentive
Equipment: Overall very clean. Excellent washroom. Entirely non-smoking
Prices: reasonable
Strong points: Very fresh fish, mainly local. Excellent cooked fish and seafood. many local sake!

Numazu Uogashi restaurants are so called because they originate from a company based in Nymazu City in the eastern part of Shizuoka Prefecture which is connected with the fishing harbour and its trade.
This very placelocated on the first floor of Parche Department Store (Inside Shizuoka JR Station) just in front of Associa Hotel used to be a conveyor-style sushi restaurant but it was recencently converted into a “nagare Sushi restaurant”, a system invented by this very company!

Each table or seat has its own computer panel to choose and order food from. You can browse the whole at ease, choose or modify your order until you confirm it. Then it will reach you through a special rolling floor to be diverted at the last second to your seat only!

That is what we ordered on that particular day!
Katsuo/bonito sashimi!

Steamed oysters! Enormous!

They also serve izakaya style dishes: tukune/minced chicken brochettes!

One of the evry good local sake after the initial beer! They also have wine on the menu!

Enormous multiple seafood gunkan sushi!

Closer view!

Deep-fried globe fish on the bone! To eat with your fingers!

Stir-fried tuna!

Local seafood sushi nigiri set!

And asari/cockles miso soup to washi all down!
Perfect for limited purses!

Numazu Uogashi Nagare Sushi, Shizuoka Parche Restaurant

420-0551 Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Kurogane Cho, 49, Parche, 1F, Shizuoka JR Station
Tel.: 054-251-6116
Opening hours: 11:00~22:00
Credit cards OK

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

Shioya Kichie Wasabi Farm in Izu City, Shizuoka Prefecture!

The other day I had the opportunity to visit Shioya Kichie Wasabi Farm deep inside Izu Peninsula in Shizuoka Prefecture!
We met at Shuzenji Station, the last station along the Izu-Hakone private railway line joining Mishima City andd Shuzenji.
From there it was a fairly long trip by car deep into the Amagi Mountains to Kichie’s Farm before boarding a lighter car to manage the narrow roads to his fields located at about 300 meter altitude.
It is still much lower than Utogi, the birthplace of wasabi, meaning different condtions in cultivation and maintenace!

Higher temperatures and lower altitude mean that utmost care must be given to a regular water flow, most of it coming from natural sources and the cleanliness of the soil made mainly of sand and fine gravel which must be regularly tilled in between new transplanting occuring in a staggered fashion to ensure a constant harvest all year round although quality and quantiry will evidently differ depending on the sseason!

All this means no holidays for the growers as they must chack daily on the possibility of natural disease and pests proliferation!
They do have techniques to prevent the latter far different from those used in Utogi. Generally speaking wasabi cultivation in Izu Peninsula is still recent going back only to three geanerations or so!

Water must funneled out of each water field along channels to prevent impurities from one field to accumuate inside another one! Of course the water running in the chunnels must be controlled and the chunnels regularly cleaned!

We did have to trudge along in between the water fields and it does demand some good athletic skills! no wonder Mr. Shioya is so thin and fleet-footed!

Roots are cleaned with water sprays instead of brushes which harm the skin! before that secondary rhizomes/subroots will be taken out for replanting!

Wasabi flowering occurs there more than a month before Utogi! Of course they are edible!

A beautful “mazuma” cultivar wasabi root Mr. Shioya took home to have us taste it!

The light lunch prepared for us by Mrs. Shioya!

Wasabi potato salad, wasabi and cheese, wasabi stem pickles!

Succulent sushi rolls!

With fresh wasabi root grated by Kichie!

And wasabi leaf tempura for dessert!
Talk about Japanese hospitality!

Kichie Shioya Wasabi Farm/塩谷吉栄山葵農園 (producer and seller)
410-2516 Shizuoka Prefecture, Izu Shi, Ikanaba, 35
Tel.: 0558-83-0136

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

Shizuoka Cycling Gourmet Ride 1: Shimada JR Station North Exit Area

Cycling has many advantages when searching nice places both on and off the beaten tracks!
You can stop anywhere, any time while moving at an easy pace faster than on foot and with much less strain. Moreover it is a very healthy way to eliminate the extra calories you have been enjoying on the way!
Moreover, cycling is a joy in Shizuoka Prefecture thanks to its mild climate allowing for long sorties any time of the year!
Shimada City is a location rapidly gaining recognition, what with the nearby international airport and the ever increasing influx of tourists, so shall we start by getting off or meeting at the north exit of Shimada JR Station!

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B Cafe is a nice little cafe cum bar very close to the station but along a side street away from the traffic.
The cakes there are all made on site and although food generally is yummy this is my favorite spot for a quiet drip coffee and one of those succulent cheese cakes!

427–0022 Shimada City, Hontori, 1-9-10
Tel.: 0547-35-6538
Opening hours: 10:00 am~~
Closed on Wednesdays, 1st & 3rd Sundays
Entirely non-smoking!
Check the opening hours and other offerings on AYANO ASAOKA on FACEBOOK!

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Tonbo/とんぼ is a real find when it comes to takoyaki/octopus dumplings, a favorite among tourists and Japanese alike!
This is the genuine article in Osaka-style fashion cooked in front of your very eyes!
And don’t forget the succulent hot plate cooked okonmiyaki, soba Modan and pork egg roll, the whole accompanied by a local Oomuraya Brewery sake!

427-0029 Shimada City, Hinode-Cho, 1-1 ( few minutes’ walk straight from Shimada JR Station North exit)
Tel.: 0547-35-7635
Opening hours: 17:00~22:00
Closed on Sundays and national Holidays.
Orders on the phone and take-out OK!

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SETSUGEKKA/雪月花 is not only a way above average soba/buckwheat noodles restaurant but an establishment specializing in exquisite tempura, all at reasonable prices, served with rare sake from the neighboring oomuraya sake Brewery!
Come early as it tends to be full quickly!

Shimada City, Hontouri, 2-3-4
Tel.: 0547-35-5241
Opening hours: 11:30~14:30, 17:00~22:00
Closed on Monday and third Tuesday
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)
Entirely non-smoking for lunch!

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HIZUKI/ひづき for such a “country city” is just extravagant while very reasonably priced. A French/Japanese style Izakaya, it offers all the classic in a modern manner from juicy chicken karaage to butter-fried scallops and shrimps!
A place to take your “special one” to!

Chef/owner: Akimasa Ooishi/大石明昌さん
Shizuoka Prefecture, Shimada City, Hon Toori, 1 Chome, 9-19
Tel.: 0547-54-5860
Opening hours:17:30~23:30
Closed on Wednesdays

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OKONOMIYAKI SAKURAI/お好み焼桜井 is also another favorite both with locals and visitors for serving authentic Hiroshima-style okonomiyaki and this in enormous and reasonbly-priced portions! Take-outs ok!
Satisfaction guaranteed!

Shimada City, Ougi Cho, 11-14
Tel.: 0547-37-6777
Opening hours: 11:30~13:30, 16:30~20:30. 11:30~20:00 on Sundays
Closed on Wednesdays
Take-outs can be ordered on the phone
Parties welcome!

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din/g.place is another cafe tucked away from the main street but definitely worth a visit, especially in the afternoon if you have a sweet tooth! Enormous dessert plates and fine coffee!

Shimada City, Hon Toori, 1-1-10, Miyanokomichi Passage
Tel.: 0547-35-5005
Opening hours: 11:00~18:00, 08:30~18:00 on week ends. 17:00~21:00 on reservation only (from 5 guests~)
Closed on Mondays
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)
FACEBOOK

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And don’t forget OOMURAYA BREWERY
Sakes internationally recognized and be always on the lookout for extravagant and rare nectars!

Oomuraya Brewery (Wakatake, Onigoroshi, Onna Nakase)
Shimada City, Hontoori, 1-1-8
tel.: 0547-37-3058

Now, this is only a fraction of a discovery, but I am sure you will a special pleasure adding to it!
Until then, good cycling and appetite!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Vegetarian (& Vegan) Sushi: It exists in Shizuoka!

“But it is all fish!”

Well, Shizuoka City and Prefecture, being the region in Japan where the largest number of vegetable varieties is grown it is almost too easy to reassure our vegetarian (& vegan, and naturally omnivorous) friends.

With a little research you will discover more than one chef willing to tackle the challenge of a client eager to eat sushi but not fish or meat. I have introduced one of them at end of this article, but I am sure your japanese friends will come up with more!

For a start let me introduce vegetarian ( I am not but I love vegetables!) let me introduce some of the possibilities I have tasted myself!

Daikon rolls!

These rolls were made with thin wide strips of Daikon  quickly marinated in lemon water to be used instead of dry nori/seaweed.
The daikon was rolled around  sushi rice (shari) with trefoil stems, umeboshi/pickled Japanese plum meat (sorry for the unintended joke!) and shiso/perilla leaves!

The three nigiri coming with the rolls are:

Buckwheat sprouts/Hime Soba Me/姫蕎麦芽 Nigiri!

Thin leek sprouts/Me Negi/芽葱 Nigiri!

Trefoil/Mitsuba/三つ葉 Nigiri!

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Another assortment of vegetarian sushi nigiri!

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Himenegi/young thin leeks reminiscent of French ciboulette.

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Kaiwaredaikon/Japanese radish sprout, lightly boiled and topped with some umeboshi/Japanese pickled plum.

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Betarazuke/daikon lightly pickled in sweet vinegar. In this case served with a piece of shiso/perilla leaf between the shari/sushi rice and the neta/topping. Some lime skin was grated o top making for a sweet sophisticated taste!

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Mitsuba/Trefoil: the stems and leaves were slightly boiled and separated, making for a bicolour combination accentuated by finely cut kyuri/cucumber!

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Let us continue with another assortment!
Can you guess the vegetables?

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Another Himenegi/芽葱young thin leek topped with umeboshi!

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Slightly seared green peppers nigiri!

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My favorite natto/fermented beans roll!
Natto, Ume, Shiso Maki/梅紫蘇納豆巻! fermented beans, pickled Japanese plum and perilla roll!

And for dessert: Kampyou Maki?かんぴょうまき/Dry gourd shavings (recooked) Roll!

Of course this is only a start!
Depending on the season you could ask for seared mushrooms, pickled eggplants, cooked burdock root, boiled spinach, boiled rape seed flower, green or violet mizuna, salad celery, pickled radishes, etc. And for not so strict vegetarians, tamagoyaki/卵焼き?Japanese omelet!

A great time to have, surely!

Recommended Sushi Restaurant:
SUSHI SHOKUNIN BIRUKAWA/鮨職人 びる川

420-0037 Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Hitoyado-Cho, 2-5-8
Tel.: 054-251-9787
Opening hours: 17:00~23:00
Closed on Wednesdays
Reservations highly recommended
Credit cards OK
Google Map

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Vegan & Vegetarian Sushi Bento

Although I’m not a vegetarian I’ve wanted for a long time the Missus to concoct me an entirely vegetarian bento. Not only she complied, but she made it a sushi as well!

She first steamed the rice and prepared it as sushi rice (blending it a little salt, sugar and rice vinegar) before mixing plenty of sesame seeds in.
She then proceeded to cover the lot with vegetables.

She fried sliced lotus roots in spices for a hot addition to the plain boiled green peas in their pods (“snap endo” in Japanese).

Then, keeping in mind the color arrangement and the whole balance, she first added a shredded carrot salad seasoned with gomadare/sesame dressing and crushed peanuts, and next gobo kinpira/stir-fried spicy burdock root (seasoned with chili pepper and black sesame seeds). She finally topped the whole with some sliced plum tomato.

For salad and dessert she prepared a vegan/vegetarian kabocha and black beans salad to which she added fresh lettuce and Akihime strawberries from Shizuoka!

I don’t plan to be a vegan or vegetarian but my sometimes tired body can really appreciate the cuisine now and then! At least this could give good ideas to my vegetarian/vegan friends!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Shizuoka Gastronomy on Manhole Covers!

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Yaizu City is the most famous Bonito/Katsuo fishing harbor city in Japan!

Japan is increasingly becoming known all over the world for its gastronomy and more recently for its unequaled manhole covers. Shizuoka prefecture is no exception when it comes to either, or even better, to a combination of the two!

Shizuoka Prefecture has a lot to offer when it comes to gastronomy and is certainly above all when it comes to variety, be it vegetables, fruit or meat when it comes to land and a bounty of seafood when it comes to sea!

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Yaizu City has no less than three different manhole covers depicting Katsuo/Bonito for the simple reason it is the most important fishing harbor in Japan as far as bonito is concerned!

Hirame/Soles or Flounders in Hamamatsu City!

But when it comes to seafood, Yaizu City is only a portion of it all!
Come to Hamamatsu City for example. They managed to make a pun out of their own manhole covers! In Sakana, an area in downtown Hamamatsu City they have no less than four covers representing fish because “sakana” written with a different kanji/Japanese character means “fish”!

“Tara” or Cod!

Another “Hirame”/sole or Flounder!

And “Maguro”/Tuna!

Shall we continue with seafood?
Hatsushima Island is one of the few islands administered by Shizuoka Prefecture. It can be easily reached by ferry boat from Atami City.
It is celebrated for its “Iseebi”/Spiny lobster and “Sazae”/Turbo shell!

Izu Inatori fishing harbor in south west Izu Peninsula is celebrated all over Japan for its “Kinmedai”/Splendid Alfonsino!

At the very tip of Izu Peninsula Minami Izu is also proud of its “Iseebi”?Spiny lobsters!

Heda, in North eastern Izu Peninsula, now part of Numazu City, is known for “Takahashigani”/Japanese Giant Crab, the largest crab in the World!

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And to conclude with seafoods one must visit Yui, Shimizu Ward, Shizuoka City, known all over japan for its “Sakuarebi”/Cherry Shrimps. Actually there two more tiny covers depicting this little gastronomic treasure!

It is about time to switch to land products, and one cannot overlook green tea! Introduced to Shizuoka Prefecture more than 800 years ago, we are still the biggest producer in Japan. Interestingly enough, covers depicting tea are to be found only (that is, for the present!) in Kikugawa City with two different types, one of them representing the “Cha Musume”/Tea leaves handpicking girl/lady!

Shizuoka Prefecture is also renown for its strawberries and one can find them on covers in Nirayama, Izu City, also famous for World Heritage Hansharo and its beautiful views of Mount Fuji!

Hamamatsu City is not only famous for its fish, eels in particular, or oysters, but also for its oranges to be found in Mikkabi!

And we can conclude (that is, for the moment, as there must be others to come in the future, what with the booming tourism!) with a lesser known piece of gastronomy: back to the beginning of the 17th Century when Shogun Tokugawa Ieayasu retired to Sumpu (present Shizuoka City) he discovered “nasu”/egg plants exclusively grown in the Orito area (prensently Shimizu Ward, Shizuoka City) and grew so fond of them that he awarded them the appellation of “Orito Nasu”/Orito eggplants. These are still grown there and are a rare vegetable searched by all sorts of renown chefs!
Can you see it at the bottom right of the manhole cover?

Good search and bon appetit!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Sushi: Japanese~English Lexicon (latest amended in October 2017, including history)

I thought that such a lexicon would become handy both for English-speaking newcomers and long term residents!

I wrote the Japanese pronunciation first, the Chinese (Japanese kanji) characters and the English translations.

Bear in mind that many varieties of sushi have many names depending on the Japanese region. These are the common names.
If you have a question I will be glad to investigate!

By sushi I meant everything used in making it, be it omnivorous or vegetarian!
As for name of fish and seafood see separate articles!Sushi

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Traditional Japanese Fish & Seafood Classification

Akami/赤身: red-fleshed fish (tuna, bonito, etc)
Ebi-Kani:海老・蟹: crustaceans (shrimps, crabs, etc)
Gyoran/魚卵: Fish roe (salmon roe, etc)
Hikarimono/光り物: “shining fish” (scabbard fish, etc.)
Ika-Tako/烏賊・鮹: Squids (cuttlefish) and octopuses
Kai/貝: shellfish
Nagamono/長もの: “long fish” (eels, etc.)
Others/その他: squilla and sea urchins, sea slug (sea cucumber),seaweed, tamagoyaki, vegetables, etc.
Saamon/サーモン: salmons
Shiromi/白身: white-fleshed fish (sole, etc.)

Sushi History

Although “sushi” is presently written “寿司”, it is only a modern way of writing it (“ateji/当て字”, onomatopoetic writing).
The real kanji caharacters for “sushi” are “鮓”, that is the combination of “sakana/魚/fish” and “su/酢/vinegar”.
One can also find “sushi” written as “鮨”, a combination of “sakana/魚/fish” and “abura/脂/animal fat”, but it is actually the original word for “shokara/塩辛/salted fish or squid
Actually “sushi” is the abbreviation of “sppashi” which meant “sour”!
Sushi chronologically appeared as such:
-Narezushi /熟れ鮨 (Nara and Heian Eras, 710~1185), when it was introduced from Soth East Asia. Its mst famous representatives (still found in Japan) are: funazushi/鮒ずし/Crucian Carp fermented with rice in Shiga Prefecture, sabanarezushi/鯖なれずし/mackerel fermented in rice also in Shiga Prefecture (also called sabazushi/鯖ずし) and sanmanamanarezushi/さんまなまなれずし/fermented Pacific saury/sanma/秋刀魚 traditionally presented with three slices of fish (Mie Prefecture).
Note: Narezushi is the abbreviation of Namarezushi. The concept of sushi was then completed different of modern day sushi as such sushi was only to accompany freshly steamed rice or rice balls at meals. Sushi in those times were the equivalent of modern pickles.
-During the Heian and Kamakura Eras (epecially during the 12th=14th Centuries) appeared the single word “sushi” which meant “hanzushi飯ずし/steamed rice sushi” aand “Tsukemonozushi/漬物ずし/Pickled sushi”. A typicla Hanzushi was Hokkaido salmon sushi called “Sake no hanzushi/鮭の飯ずし”, Ishikawa Prefecture “Kaburazushi/かぶらずし” made with buri/鰤/yellowtail-Japanese amberjack and Osaka “Osakazushi” made with mackerel.
-The present Osaka Style sushi, Hakozushi/箱ずし also called “Oshizushi/押しずし” or sushi pressed inside a box and cut in rectangular or square pieces appeared durin the Muromachi Era (14th~16th Centuries).
At the same time appeared the “Bozushi/棒ずし/sushi in the shape of a log”, notably in Ehime Prefecture, although the fish was then fermented together with rice. Nowadays the whole fish is pressed above normal sushi rice.
Steamed rice blended with vinegar in particular as the base for sushi appeared in the middle of Edo area (18th Century then). Its best example was the “Sasamaki tenuke zushi/笹巻き手抜きずし”, when pickled seafood and else were laid on longish ric”stickks” and left to pickle for a short time rolled inside leaves.
-The modern form of sushi appeeared in Edo (presently Tokyo) under the name of Edomaezushi/Edomaenigirizushi/江戸前ずし・江戸前握りずし/finger pressed sushi (around 1820), but stayed confined to the Tokyo area for a long time before getting known all over Japan after the Great Kanto Earthquake in 1923. But sushi was almost exclusively using pickled or marinated “neta/topping” until the end of WWII. modern times with the advent of better refrigerated and preserved fresh food witnessed more and more fresh raw fish used in the making of sushi. Edomaezushi is still popular in Tokyo but foreign visitors in particular should realize it has become only a small part of the sushi world and remember that any of the 47 Japanese Prefectures has its own particular sushi and neta/topping to boast! Therefore nowadays sushi is more of a whole country gastronomic adventure!

Sushi presentations

Ankimo/安肝: frogfish/monkfish liver steamed in sake and served as firm paste. Also nicknamed “Japanese Foie gras”!
Bara sushi/ばら寿司(also called Gomoku sushi/五目寿司, Tekone zushi/手こね寿司): A simple form of Chirashi zushi
Battera Sushi/バッテラ寿司: from “bateira” in Portuguese.Traditional sushi made with spotted gizzard shad
Bougata/Bougata Sushi/棒型寿司 (also called Bou Suhi/棒寿司: Fish wholly placed onto a long rice ball or whole fish pressed over pressed rice/oshi zushi. Served whole or cut.
California Roll/カリフォルニアロル: Californian style sushi roll including at least some avocado. Can be presented rolled with the dry seaweed outside or inside (often sprinkled with roasted black sesame seeds in the latter case)
Chirashizushi/散らし寿司: “Decoration Sushi”. Usually home-made style sushi consisting of a large dish, wooden vessel filled with sushi rice and topped with all kinds of ingredients
Dashimaki/だし巻き: a variety of Japanese omelet served as a roll
Donburi/Sushi Donburi/丼, 丼寿司: Sushi served as bowl full of sushi rice topped with a single or many toppings
Edomaezushi/Edomaenigirizushi/江戸前ずし・江戸前握りずし: traditional Tokyo-style sushi which first appeared around 1820. The present form was born in 1947
Funa Zushi/鮒寿司: Pickled crucian carp sushi (one of the traditional Narezushi/熟れ鮨)
Futo Maki/Futo Maki Sushi/太巻, 太巻き寿司: Large sushi roll, traditionally including at least seven ingredients rolled inside. Served cut into thin slices.
Gomoku sushi/五目寿司 (also called Bara sushi/ばら寿司, Tekone zushi/手こね寿司): A simple form of Chirashi zushi
Gunkan/Gunkan Nigiri/Gunkan Nigiri Sushi/軍艦, 軍艦握り, 軍艦握り寿司: “mother Ship style sushi. The rice ball is wrapped with a narrow band of dry seaweed slightly higher than the rice ball to allow space for ingredients otherwise difficult to present as simple nigiri sushi.
Hanzushi/飯ずし: traditional sushi in Heian Era (794 to 1185 A.D)
Hoso maki/Hoso maki Sushi/細巻, 細巻き寿司: long and thin sushi roll, usually served cut, unless requested otherwise
Inari/Inari zushi/稲荷, 稲荷寿司: traditional sushi presentation where a pouch made of fried tofu is filled with sushi rice alone or mixed with finely cut ingredients to resemble a traditional rice pack
Kaburazusi/かぶらずし: Traditional sushi prepared in Ishikawa and Toyama Prefectures
Kaki no Ha Sushi/柿の葉寿司: traditional pressed sushi enveloped inside persimmon leaves
Kanpyou Maki/干瓢巻: traditional dry gourd shavings sushi roll
Kappa Maki/河童巻: cucumber sushi roll (Kappa/Water goblin are supposed to be fond of cucumbers!)
Ko Donburi/Sushi Ko Donburi/子丼, 寿司子丼: small donburi/sushi bowl, popular with ladies
Maki/maki Sushi/巻き, 巻き寿司: sushi roll
Matsumae Sushi/松前寿司: traditional mackerel sushi presented in Bogata style
Mehari sushi/めはり寿司: traditional sushi balls enveloped inside pickled leaves
Millefeuille/ミルフィーユ: A modern sushi style reminiscent of a French mllefeuille
Miso Shiru/味噌汁: miso soup
Namarezushi/なまれずし: traditional sushi form in from Heian and Muromachi Eras ( 13th~14th century)
Narezushi/熟れ鮨: Original form of sushi imported from South eastern Asia (710~). Pickled fish was wrapped around sushi rice for transport away from the sea.
Negitoro Maki/ネギトロ巻き: sushi roll containing grated tuna fat belly flesh
Nigiri/Nigiri sushi/握り, 握り寿司: sushi made with a hand-made ball of sushi rice topped with any ingredient
Oshi Sushi/押し寿司: type of sushi popular in the Kansai region where the sushi rice and toppings are tightly pressed inside a mold instead of being manually pressed rice balls.
Piri Kara Hotate Maki/ピリ辛ホタテ巻き: sushi roll containing scallops in a spicy mayonnaise
Sabanarezushi/鯖熟れ鮨: Pickled mackerel carp sushi (one of the traditional Narezushi/熟れ鮨)
Saimaki/最巻: a traditional presentation for shrimp sushi
Rainbow Maki/レーンボー巻: a modern form of Futo maki/太巻/large roll containing seven ingredients rolled inside. Served in slices.
Sake/shake hanzushi/鮭飯ずし: traditional salmon sushi made in Hokkaido
Sanma namarezushi/秋刀魚なまれずし: traditional sushi made with fermented mackerel pike im Mie and Wakayama Prefectures
Sasamaki tenuke sushi/笹巻き手抜きすし: traditional form of sushi dating back from the beginning of the 18th Century
Shiba ebi no suruimi ire tamagoyaki/芝海老のすり身入れたmご焼き:Japanese omelet containing striped shrimp paste
Shiyokara/塩辛: salted fish or squid
Tekka Maki/鉄火巻き: tuna sushi roll
Tekone zushi/手こね寿司 (also called Bara sushi/ばら寿司, Gomoku sushi/五目寿司): A simple form of Chirashi zushi
Te-Maki/Te-Maki sushi/手巻き, 手巻き寿司: hand-rolled sushi, usually in the shape of a cone
Te-mari Zushi/手毬寿司: Sushi presented in small round balls, especially popular with ladies
Tamagoyaki/卵焼き: traditional Japanese omelet

Sashimi presentations

Moriawase/盛り合わせ: large assortment
O-Makase/お任せ: Chef7s choice
O-Tsukuri/お作り: Sashimi plate
Sukeroku Zushi/助六寿司: traditional combination of Inari sushi and Futo maki
Tataki/叩き: 1) sashimi served finely cut like a tartar style
2) the fish fillet, especially bonito, is first seared over a charcoal or straw fire, then plunged into cold water before being served sliced

Ingredients (other than fish and seafood)

Baniku/馬肉 (also called Sakura/桜): horsemeat
Goma/胡麻: Sesame seeds, golden or black, both roasted
Gomatare/胡麻たれ/: sesame seeds dressing
Kanpyou/干瓢: died gourd shavings
Kome/米: rice
Momiji/紅葉(also called Shikaniku/鹿肉): venison
Miso/味噌: fermented soy bean paste
Niika/煎烏賊: simmered squid
Nori/海苔: seaweed, dry seaweed
Sakura/桜(also called Baniku/馬肉): horsemeat
Satou/砂糖: sugar
Shouyu/醤油: soy sauce
Shikaniku/鹿肉 (also called Momiji/紅葉): venison
Su/酢: vinegar: rice vinegar
Tamago/卵: egg
Uzura no tamago/鶉の卵: quail eggs
Yasai/野菜: vegetables (s)
Wagyu/和牛: wagyu beef
Wasabi/山葵

Technical terms

Bettarazuke/べったら漬: a traditional sweet pickled daikon
Dashi/出し: Japanese-style soupstock (also called dashi Jiru/だし汁)
Gari/ガリ: pickled ginger
Konbujime/昆布締め: raw fish pickled between fresh seaweed sheets
Neta/ネタ: sushi balls/nigiri toppings
Shari/シャリ: the ball of rice in a nigiri sushi
Zuke/漬け: pickled or marinated

Vegetarian Sushi/Vegan Sushi Ingredients ( also see “Algae/Seaweed” below!)

Daikon/大根: Japanese large radish
Gobou/牛蒡 (includes Yama Gobou/山牛蒡): burdock root
Goma/胡麻: sesame seeds
Goya/ゴーヤ (also called Niga uri/苦瓜 ): bitter gourd/ goya
Himesoba/姫蕎麦 (also called Soba no Me/蕎麦の芽): buckwheat sprouts
Kaiware daikon/カイワレ大根: daikon sprouts
Kanpyou/干瓢: dried gourd shavings
Kappa Maki/河童巻: cucumber sushi roll
Kinoko/茸:mushroom (s)
Kyuuri/胡瓜: cucumber
Matsutake/松茸: matsutake mushroom
Me/芽: Sprouts
Menegi/目ネギ: leek sprouts
Miso/味噌: fermented soy bean paste
Mitsuba/三つ葉: a trefoil
Myouga/茗荷: myoga ginger
Nameko: 滑子: nameko mushroom(s)
Nattou/納豆: fermented soy beans
Negi/葱: leek
Niga uri/苦瓜 (also called Goya/ゴーヤ): bitter gourd/ goya
Shiitake/椎茸: shiitake mushroom
Shyouga/生姜: ginger
Soba no Me/蕎麦の芽 (also called Himesoba/姫蕎麦): buckwheat sprouts
Takuan/沢庵: traditional pickled Japanese radish
Ume/梅: Japanese plum. Can be eaten only processed, not raw
Umeboshi/梅干: pickled (salt-pickled) Japanese plums
Ume Natto/梅納豆: a traditional combination of pickled Japanese plum and fermented soy beans
Wasabi/山葵
Yasai/野菜: vegetable(s)

Algae/Seaweed

BROWN ALGAE:
-Konbu/昆布, or Laminariaceae Bory (Latin), comprises many varieties, some of them regional: Makonbu or Saccharina japonica(真昆布), Onikonbu or Laminaria diabolica(羅臼昆布), Rishiri Konbu or Laminaria ochotensis(利尻昆布), Hosome Konbu or Laminaria religiosa(細目昆布), Hitaka or Mitsuishi Konbu or Laminaria angustata(日高昆布、三石昆布), Naga or Hamanaka Konbu or Laminaria longissima(長昆布、浜中昆布), and Kagome or Kjellmaniella crassifolia(籠目昆布).
-Hijiki or hiziki (ヒジキ, 鹿尾菜 or 羊栖菜, hijiki) (Sargassum fusiforme, or Hizikia fusiformis) is a brown sea vegetable growing wild on rocky coastlines around Japan, Korea, and China. Its two names mean deer-tail grass and sheep-nest grass respectively.
-Hibatama or Fucus, a genus of brown alga in the Class Phaeophyceae to be found in the intertidal zones of rocky seashores almost everywhere in the world.
-Hondawara or ホンダワラ(馬尾藻、神馬藻 (Sargassum fulvellum)
-Mozuku, or Cladosiphon okamuranus (水雲; 藻付; 海蘊; 海雲) , a type of edible seaweed in the genus Cladosiphon, naturally found in Okinawa, Japan. Most of the mozuku now is farmed by locals, and sold to processing factories. The main use of mozuku is as food, and as source of one type of sulfated polysaccharide called Fucoidan to be used in cancer treatment aid health supplements.
-Wakame (ワカメ), Undaria pinnatifida, a sea vegetable, or edible seaweed. In Japan it is most widely used in miso soup.

VIOLET ALGAE:
-Asakusa Nori, or アサクサノリ(浅草海苔 (Porphyra tenera).
-Tengusa/天草, which gives agar agar, a gelatinous substance. Historically and in a modern context, it is chiefly used as an ingredient in desserts throughout Japan, but also as solid jelly used as decoration in salads and others.
GREEN ALGAE:
-Aosa/碧草 or sea lettuce comprising comprise the genus Ulva, a group of edible green algae that are widely distributed along the coasts of the world’s oceans.
-Aonori /青海苔 ,アオノリ, “blue seaweed” or “green seaweed”), also known as green laver, a type of edible green seaweed, including species from the genera Monostroma and Enteromorpha of Ulvaceae. It is commercially cultivated in some bay areas in Japan, such as Ise Bay. It contains rich minerals such as calcium, magnesium, lithium, vitamins, and amino acids such as methionine.
-Umibudou/海葡萄: or sea grapes from Okinawa, a delicacy of its own!
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RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents
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