Tag Archives: Daikon

Indecent (Well-Hung?) Daikon!

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No, I didn’t make up this photograph!
I found this interesting daikon at Akutsu Organic Food Store!
This often happens in Organic culture, especially when water is lacking, forcing the daikon to grow more roots!

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As you can his friends do not stand the comparison!
All were grown organically in Ishigami Garden, Suruga Ku, Shizuoka City!

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Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

Japanese Vegan Recipe: Simmered Daikon with Miso Sauce-Furofuki Daikon-風呂吹き大根

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I’m no vegan and never will be, but many of my friends are!

Now, daikon, or Japanese radish, has become a universal vegetable and recipes to accommodate it are innumerable!
The Japanese, especially in winter, have a very interesting way to cook it and serve it with a miso-based sauce, which even me, a meat eater, just can keep my fingers away from: furofuki daikon!
It si served in many restaurants from modest ones to very expensive establishments who keep their recipes secret, although there is very little to hide!

Here is a basic recipe that will allow you plenty of leeway.
bear in mind that this the basic recipe. I will leave precise proportions to your skills and priorities!

INGREDIENTS:

Daikon
Rice: a few grams
Konbu/seaweed
Irigoma/ground sesame seeds
Daikon leaves

Sauce:
White miso
Red miso
Mirin
sake
Sugar
Konbu Dashi/Seaweed soupstock

RECIPE:

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Cut the daikon into round slices about 4~5 cm thick.

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Peel the daikon slices.
Do not throw the peeled skin away. You can cut it fine and use it in many recipes such kinpira!

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Cut away the sharp edges. This will prevent the daikon to break into pieces during the cooking!

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Make a cross shallow cut on both sides. There are many reasons for doin this!

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Fill a large pot with enough water to cover the daikon. Add konbu/seweed. drop the daikon in water.
Let simmer over a light fire for about an hour or until the daikon ha become soft. If daikon emerge because of insufficient water, add hot wter (cold would stop the cooking!) so as to cover the daikon.

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Adding rice to the daikon (form the start) will sweeten it and also help whiten it.

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While the daikon is simmering prepare the sauce with white miso, red miso, mirin, sugar, sake and konbu dashi soup stock.
This is when your taste preferences can be taken into account!

Cook all the ingredients together in pan stirring all the time with wooden spoon.
Cook until you obtain a thick paste.

Serve the daikon topped with sauce and sprinkled with ground sesame (irigoma). sesame seeds can be served whole, too, naturally!
Serve it together with its steamed leaves!

It can served hot in winter or cold in summer!
Enjoy!

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Shop with Intent by Debbie
BULA KANA in Fiji
Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

Vegan Japanese Recipe: Daikon Leaves, Imo and Miso Stew

Here is another simple Japanese recipe to satisfy hungry vegans and vegetarians which also has the merit to be ecological and nutritious!

INGREDIENTS: for 4 people

-Daion leaves: all the leaves of 1 large daikon
-Taro, sato imo/里芋 (frozen or fresh and pre-boiled) 8~10 (peeled)
-Aburaage/fried tofu sheet: 1
-Miso paste (of your choice): 4 tablespoons
-Sugar: 4 tablespoons
-Sesame oil: a little
-Cornstarch: as appropriate

RECIPE:

Cut the daikon leaves and aburaage finely and frt in sesame oil until satsifactory.

Add enough water to dissolve the miso into a proper miso soup. Add imo.

Once the imo are cooked to satisfaction add miso paste, sugar. mix. last add cornstarch to attain the appropiate consistency.

So easy!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Vegan Japanese Recupe: Daikon Leaves and Ginger Furikake

As I said many times it is a shame to throw perfectly edible and delicious fresh daikon leaves when you happen to find them!
Now if you also happen to have ginger roots, soft and fresh, you can produce an even better furikake/”sprinkle” for accompany any dish or use a great snack with beer or sake!
Bear in mind that the recipe can be adapted to any root vegetable leaves (if edible!)!

INGREDIENTS: for 4 people

Daikon leaves of one daikon
Ginger root: a small cube, 3x3x3 cm
Mirin/Sweet Japanese sake: 3 tablespoons
Soy sauce: 3 tablespoons
Sesame oil: 1~3 tablespoons
Sesame seeds (grilled): as appropriate according to preference

RECIPE

-Chop daikon leaves and ginger root finely.

-Pour sesame oil in a frypan and stir-fry ginger a little first.

-Add daikon leaves, mirin, and soy sauce and stir-fry over medium-strong fire until all juices have evaporated.

-Add sesame seeds and serve!

Easy, healthy and very tasty!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Vegan Japanese Recipe: Daikon Leaves Appetizer

Too many people often discard the leaves of fresh daikon they buy at the market and it is a shame as they are a great source of healthy ingredients.
Here is one simple way to prepare them as an appetizer for all priorities! The recipe can be applied to all kinds of vegetable leaves!

INGREDIENTS

-Daikon leaves: 1 daikon
-Garlic: 2 cloves/sliced
-Aburaage/Japanese fried tofu: 2
-Olive oil: 1 tablespoon

-Soy sauce: 1 tablespoon
-Mirin/sweet Japanese sake: 1 tablespoon
-Japanese sake (if not available, dry white wine): 1 tablespoon
-Rayu/Hot sesame oil: 1 teaspoon

RECIPE

Cook the daikon leaves in boiling water till they are ready to your liking. Take out the leaves and drop into cold water to stop the cooking and cool them down completeley.

Drain as much as you can. Press water out if necessary.

Slice the garlic cloves.
Cut the aburaage across into strips 1 cm wide.
Cut the daikon leaves into strips 1 cm wide.

Heat olive oil and fry the whole rapidly and not too long.
Add soy sauce, mirin, Japanese sake, rayu and stir fry a couple of times and serve!

So simple and great with a beer!
The point is that you will make use of a great ingredient that is usually thrown away. Cooked this way the daikon leaves will not emit any sour taste!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Food Humor: Boomerang Daikon et al!

As I going down the stairs of my apartment this morning to dispose of our rubbish I noticed our dear neighbor, Mr. Yoshizo Sugiyama, washing the daikon he had just pulled out of his big garden.
Nothing much to comment about that, except that some of the daikon were of a farout shape!

Apparently the sudden changes of temperature last summer affected the drainage forcing the daikon in “searching for water.

A “twisting ballet dancer”?

That one really tried to swim into two different directions at the same time! LOL

Looking for more!

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Please check the new postings at:
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As I going down the stairs of my appartment this morning to get rid of our rubbish, I noticed my dear neighbour, Mr. Yoshizo Sugiyama, washing daikon he has jest pulled out of his graden.
Nothing to talk about in itself, bu the shapes of some daikon were a different matter!

Due to the great sudden changes of temperature this summer and drainage being consequently affected, the daikon had to “search” their water, hence the strange shapes!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Chrisoscope

Please check the new postings at:
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Vegan Japanese Cuisine: Daikon & Dried Persimmon Salad

Persimmon can be enjoyed all year round if you dry them.
Now, if you cannot get them on the market, dry them yourself in season next time. It’s not difficult:
Peel them completely, keeping the petal and stem core. Pass a thread through the persimmon and under the stem core. Hang them to dry in the sun (when it rains hang them in dry place).
Preserve them with a sugar coating in a dry box or freeze them!

INGREDIENTS:

-Daikon: 4 cm long cut
-Dried persimmons: 2~3
-Ground sesame seeds/surigoma: 2 tablespoons
-Rice vinegar: 2 tablespoons
-Sugar: 1 and a half tablespoons
-Light soy sauce: a little
-Salt: a pinch

RECIPE:

-Cut the daikon in 2 mm thick, 1×3 cm strips. Massage them with salt and wash them in clear cold water. Drain thoroughly by pressing them inside your hand/fist.

-Cut the stem core out of the dried persimmon. Wash the persimmon with rice vinegar. First cut cut in half, spread and cut in 2=3 mm thick strips.

-Drop the ground sesame seeds in a bowl Add the rice vinegar, sugar, soy sauce and salt (experiment!). Mix well.
If you do not have ground sesame seeds, first grind 2 tablespoons of sesame seeds in a mortar with a pestle until it has turned into a rough paste.
Add the daikon and persimmon. Mix well and serve (themore artistically, the better!LOL)

Add some small leaf greens for the finishing touch!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

Vegan Japanese Cuisine: Fried Spicy Natto & Daikon

Since I started this series on natto, (Lou Ann, keep your eyes open!), I seem to have found more vegan recipes for it!

Fried Spicy Natto & Daikon:

INGREDIENTS: For 2~3 people

-Daikon: 10 cm long piece (peeled, bear in mind that the bottom tip is hotter!)

-Natto: 2 standard packs
-Soy sauce: 2 tablespoons
-Mirin/Sweet sake: 1 tablespoon

-Seven Flavor Chili Pepper/Shichimi Togarashi (Shichimi)/七味唐辛子/: as much as you like!

RECIPE:

-Cut the daikon into 1~2 cm square pieces.
Mix the natto with the tare and other condiments provided in a bowl. Put aside.

-Pour some oil in a frypan. Fry the daikon pieces over a medium fire until they become half transaprent.

-Lower the fire. Add the natto to the daikon and mix well while cooking until the natto has become less sticky.

-Add soy sauce and mirin. Stir. Check taste and add seasoning if needed.
Last add Shichimi and mix.
Serve with beer or Japanese sake!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Ideal Party

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

Vegan Japanese Cuisine: Daikon Chrysanthemums

Here is a simple and “artistic” recipe using daikon and yuzu/lime.
It’s called 菊花大根/Kikuhana Daikon which can be translated as Chrysanthemum Daikon.
You don’t need Chrysanthemums, but only cut the daikon into the shape of the flower!

INGREDIENTS:

-Daikon: Roughly a quarter.
-Lime: 1
-Salt: a little
-Sugar: 3 tablespoons

RECIPE:

-Cut the daikon into slices you will then trim into the shape of flowers with a knife or a mold. As for the trimmings you may add them to the whole marinade and serve them with another salad or side dish.

-Sprinkle the daikon flowers with a little salt and let them marinate for 10~15 minutes.

-Peel the lime and cut the skin/zest into thin strips.

-In a bowl, press out the lime juice. If you don’t get enough, add rice vinegar to it until you obtain the equivalent of 3 tablespoons of “juice”. Add the sugar and lime zest strips and mix well.

-Drain the daikon flowers (and trimmings if included). No need to press them hard. Add them to the marinade. Cover with cellophane paper and let marinate inside the fridge for a whole day.

-Serve it in a nice “artistic” fashion!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Daikon Couple: The Pious and The Pervert…

Just found this odd couple lying on the kitchen floor lying in unknowing bliss before being chopped into stew!
They had come form the Missus’ parents farm.

Now, why did the Missus trim that appendage?

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Bread + Butter, Comestilblog, Greedy Girl, Bouchon For 2, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Mangantayon, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles, Lexi, Culinary Musings, Eats and Everything, Bite Me New England, Heather Sweet, Warren Bobrow, 5 Star Foodie, Frank Fariello, Oyster Culture, Ramendo, Alchemist Chef, Ochikeron, Mrs. Lavendula, The Gipsy Chef, Spirited Miu Flavor, Wheeling Gourmet, Chef de Plunge, Sushi Nomads, Island Vittles, The French Market Maven, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glas, Palate To Pen, Tokyo Foodcast, Good Beer & Country Boys, Tokyo Terrace, Think Twice, Jefferson’s Table

Please check the new postings at:
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Takuan/Japanese Pickled Daikon: Basic Recipe

Takuan (沢庵), also known as takuwan or takuan-zuke, is a popular traditional Japanese pickle. It is made from daikon radish. In addition to being served alongside other types of tsukemono/Japanese-style pickles in traditional Japanese cuisine, takuan is also enjoyed at the end of meals as it is thought to aid digestion.

Takuan is made by first hanging a daikon radish in the sun for a few weeks until it becomes flexible. Next, the daikon is placed in a pickling crock and covered with a mix of salt, rice bran, optionally sugar, daikon greens, kombu/Dry seaweed, and perhaps chilli pepper and/or dried persimmon peels/even flowers for colouring. A weight is then placed on top of the crock, and the daikon is allowed to pickle for several months. The finished takuan is usually yellow in colour, although most mass-produced takuan rely on food coloring for this effect.

Takuan is popular also in South Korea, and is called danmuji (단무지). It is used as a filling for gimbap, or as an accompaniment to Korean dishes, typically jajangmyeon.

Here is a simple basic recipe to make when you get hold of plenty cheap daikon. Since it is vegan in nature, it shoild please everyone!
Check the extra recipe for ideas!

INGREDIENTS: Bear in mind that the bigger the batch, the better!

-Daikon: 10~15 with their leaves!
-Rice bran: 15 % of the dried daikon weight
-Salt: 6% of the dried daikon weight
-Brown Sugar: half a tablespoon
-Chili pepper: half one, chopped, fresh
-Konbu/dry seaweed: 3~5 cm piece chopped thin
-Fruit peel (persimmon, orange according to colour): 2 fruits
-White sugar: 1 tablespoon per daikon

FIRST RECIPE:

Wash the daikon with their leaves. It is important to dry them with their leaves as to prevent a loos in quality. Place them to dry in a spot well exposed to the sun and wind. Let them dry for 1~2 weeks. Bring them inside at night if you think morning dew will come on them!
They will be ready the moment they bend easily.

-Wipe daikon with a clean towel.
Weight the daikon then and prepare rice bran (15% of daikon weight) and salt (6% of daikon weight).

-Cut the leaves with the end of the daikon. Cut enough of the daikon so that the leaves hold together. Put leaves aside. You will use them later!

-Put each daikon (work on one at a time) on a working table. Roll it by solidly pressing your palms on the daikon all along its length to soften evental hard spots and even the humidity inside.

-In a separate bowl pour in the rice bran, salt, brown sugar, chopped konbu/seaweed, chopped chili pepper and white sugar. Mix well.

-Use a large pickles jar/bucket.
First line the bottom with some of the pickle mixture.
Line a first layer of daikon, leaving as little sapce between as possible.
Sprinkle with pickle mixture.
Fill any space left with the daikon leaves.
Repeat same procedure with the rest of the daikon.

-Line the top with the remaining daikon leaves.
Press down with your hands, putting all your weight behind your hands.
Sprinkle some extra salt over the top to prevent mold from forming.

You can use a special pickle vat as in picture above and screw down the lid for maximum pressure.
If you uve a normal vat, plce a clean wooden or plastic circle on top of the daikon and lay a weight/stone at least 3 times the weight of the daikon.
In the latter case cover with newspaper and a lid to prevent any dust insid.e

-Pickle for 4 weeks in winter, or 3 weeks in summer.
Clean them quickly in clean cold running water before cutting and serving them!

SECOND RECIPE: Traditional but the process is the same!

INGREDIENTS:

-1) Dried daikon: 12 kg
-2) Rice bran: 1.5 kg
-3) Salt: 720 g
-4) Kaki/Persimmon (frozen): 5~6
-Chili peppers: 10 (cut in halves9
-Konbu/seaweed: 40 cm (to be chopped)

Look at the pictures, the process is the same!

Drying

Soft enough to bend

Cutting the leaves away

Pickle mixture

Pickle mixture added with kobu, chili peppers and persimmons

Fitting the daikon in tightly

Covering with the pickle mixture

Covering with the leaves

Putting the weights on top!

Two months later.

Washed, cut and served!

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Bread + Butter, Comestilblog, Greedy Girl, Bouchon For 2, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Mangantayon, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles, Lexi, Culinary Musings, Eats and Everything, Bite Me New England, Heather Sweet, Warren Bobrow, 5 Star Foodie, Frank Fariello, Oyster Culture, Ramendo, Alchemist Chef, Ochikeron, Mrs. Lavendula, The Gipsy Chef, Spirited Miu Flavor, Wheeling Gourmet, Chef de Plunge, Sushi Nomads, Island Vittles, The French Market Maven, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glas, Palate To Pen, Tokyo Foodcast, Good Beer & Country Boys, Tokyo Terrace, Think Twice, Jefferson’s Table, While mY Sautoir Gently Weeps

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Vegan Sushi Recipe Suggestions 2: Daikon

Daikon Nigiri as served at Sushi Ko, Shizuoka City, Japan!

SYNOPSIS:

I already have introduced Vegan and Vegetarian Sushi, but following further requests and questions by my vegan (I’m not!) friends, I decided to contribute a small series of postings to give them more detailed suggestions and ideas!

Now, please check sushi rice recipe HERE to make things more practical!

1) Myoga/Myoga Ginger

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The second vegetable amenable to sushi I would like to introduce is Daikon, or Japanese Radish/Daikon Radish.

Please check DAIKON HERE on Wikipedia!

Daikon seems to be known only in its big white shape with a green top.
Actually, not only it is a versatile vegetables, but it does come into many shapes and colors as shown in picture above.

Once cut, look at these beautiful colors.

Daikon sushi, especially served as nigiri can be made very simple as in above picture where the daikon was sliced very thin and marinated for a while in lemon added water.

For more sophisticated preparations and presentations browse below!

The same as the top picture. The daikon was marinated for a while in yuzu juice and rice vinegar then derved with grated yuzu zest/skin.

Simple but so sophisticated. The other one is rape blossom.

Daikon can be pickled Japanese-style into “takuan/沢庵”, making for great colors and combination!

Takuan & Beni Shoga/takuan and red ginger temari sushi!

Great color afain with Koushin Daikon/紅芯大根!

The possibilities are infinite. Can you imagine the takuan above on a rice ball. The whole daikon was first pickled then peeled/cut into a sheet, rolled with lettuce and cut across!

And how about a daikon millefeuille sushi for dessert!

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Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless MamaFrank Fariello, , Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3

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sake, shochu and sushi

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Pervert Daikon?


The Japan Blog List

Please check the new postings at:
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pervert-daikon

My usually prudish half turned up triumphantly with this strange daikon grown in her parents’ garden!

I didn’t know where to start cutting it…

In the end I saw gradually disappearing as I grated the whole for a “daikon-nabe”!