Tag Archives: Bamboo shots

Vegan Japanese Dessert: Sweet Potato, Apple & Gardenia Seeds Kinton

It is always a bit complicated for vegans and vegetarians alike to create desserts without using eggs or dairy products, unlessyou start using derivatives and susbstitues, which is not always a good idea.
The Japanese must be, without knowing it, the greatest creators of vegan desserts thanks to such techniques as found in the making of wagashi!

One variety of wagashi is called Kinton.
Kinton, or きんとんin Japanese is a Japanese tradtional dessert made with chestnuts/kuri/栗 and sugar.
Originally created in Gifu in the late 1870’s it is now found and available almost everywhere in Japan for the pleasure of all, vegans and vegetarians included.

Kuchinashi (Japanese) or Gardenia jasminoides (also known as Gardenia augusta) is a fragrant flowering evergreen tropical plant, a favorite in gardens worldwide. It originated in Asia and is most commonly found growing in Vietnam, Southern China, Taiwan and Japan.
The fruit is used as a yellow dye, which is used for clothes and food (including the Korean mung bean jelly called hwangpomuk).
Medicinal uses:
Gardenia jasminoides fructus (fruit) is used within Traditional Chinese Medicine to “drain fire” and thereby treat certain febrile conditions.

Kuchinashi no Mi/Gardenia fruit.

Kuchinashi no mi/Gardenia fruit, dried as found in Japanese stores.

I took the precaution to go through these preliminary explantaions before introducing the following dessert:

Sweet Potato, Apple & Gardenia Seeds Kinton!

INGREDIENTS:

-Apple: 1 large
-Sweet Potato/Satsuma Imo: 1 medium
-Lemon juice: 1/4
-Sugar: 1 tablespoon
-Gardenia seed/Kuchinashi no Mi: 1

RECIPE:

-Peel the sweet potato, cut in four legthwise and across again every 2 cm. Leave aside in clear cold water.

-Peel the apple, cut into 8 wedges and slice again every 5 mm. Drop in a stainless pot. Add lemon and sugar. Cover with lid and simmer on a low fire until softened.

-Cut the kuchinashi no mi/Gardenia seed in two and insert it in a small cooking bag (gauze as for bouquet garni).

-In a different pan, drop the sweet potato with ebnough water to boil them. Add teh kuchunashi no mi/gardenia seed. Boil until the sweet potato is soft enough to be easily skewered with a bamboo/wooden toothpick.

-Throw the water of the sweet potato out. Keep cooking the sweet potato to let their water evaporate.

-Add 1/3 of the apple to the sweet potato and mix well.

-Serve the sweet potato topped with the cooked apple.

NOTES:

-Roast some some walnuts and top the dessert with them!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless Mama, Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice, The French Market Maven, Fuji Mama, Great Teacher Sato, Peas Love Carrots

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Vegan Japanese Cuisine: Bamboo Shoots Tips & Umeboshi

Here is anothe Japanese vegan recipe for bamboo, especially young new bamboo shoots which are around the corner.

This particular recipe is called 筍の姫皮の梅肉和え/Takenoko no Himekawa no Umeniku Shitae.

Himekawa are the very tip of young bamboo shoot, not the bamboo shoot which is found in tinned bamboo shoots, but actually the inner soft part of “leafy end” of the shoot. If you have the fresh bamboo shoot, you may of course add the tip of the bamboo shoot itself.

As for umeniku, it means the “flesh” (not the seed!) of a Japanese pickled plum.
Chose large plums. I fancy the honey pickled ones for their small amount of salt!

INGREDIENTS:

-Himekawa/Bamboo shoot inner tips
-Honey pickled umeboshi (low salt content)
-Cooking Japanese sake
-Soft taste soy sauce
-Dashi: (Check HERE for Vegan Recipe!)

All ingredient quantities are up to you! Do experiment!

RECIPE:

-Cut the tip of the bamboo shoot. Discard any leafy, hairy, hard or dark part.

-Cut the bamboo tips in short strips.

-Boil the bamboo tips in dashi and soy sauce just enough to soften them a bit more and season them.

-Mash the umeboshi/Japanese pickled plum with a knife.
Season the drainedbamboo tips with the umeboshi, cooking Japanese sake and a little soy sauce in a bowl and mix.

Serve in individual plates.
This can also be served as part of a salad or a side dish. Decorate with green shoots for better impression.
You may add spices, but you will have to be careful when experimenting!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless Mama, Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice, The French Market Maven, Fuji Mama, Great Teacher Sato

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Vegan Japanese Cuisine: Simmered Bamboo Shoots

In Japan, and in Shizuoka in particular, the bamboo shoots season is about to come.
Fresh, they are so tender and provide a good bite sensation for people with vegan and vegetarian priorities.
Naturally you can buy them tinned all year round, but the quality just does not compare!
The Japanese are very found of new shoots grilled with their “skin” around them to later peel and eat them almost like corn ears!
By the way, did you know that bamboo is not a tree, but a grass?

Here is a simple vegan Japanese recipe. All ingredients hopefully can be found in Asian markets abroad:

Simmered Bamboo Shoots/Waka Take Ni/若竹煮!

INGREDIENTS:

-Bamboo shoots: 2 small, fresh if possible
-Wakame: as appropriate (can be boughtin Asian Markets in sachet/bags. Wash their salt off first and soften them if necessary)


-Ki no Me (see above): Ki no me is also also called Sansho or Japanese pepper, especially when fresh and in leaves. It is called Shishuan pepper when dried: as appropriate. If unavailable, use leafy greens or fresh spouts of any kind!

-Dashi: 2 cups/400 cc/ml (Check HERE for Vegan Recipe!)

-Salt: 1/2~teaspoon
-Soft taste soy sauce: 2 tablespoons
-Japanese sake: 1 tablepoon (if unavailable, experiment with white wine!)
-Mirin/sweet sake: 50 cc/ml

RECIPE:

-Peel bamboo shoots if necessary. Cut them along their lengths into 6 radial trips.

-Wash wakame in clear cold water and cut into bite size.

-Pour the dashi, soy sauce, sake, salt and mirin in a pan. Simmer the bamboo shoots and wakame in the mixture for 20 minutes on a medium fire, taking care not to overboil it.

-Serve hot or chilled with its soup decorated with some frsh ki no me or other greens

NOTES:

This is the “soft style” recipe. You may vary the amount of salt and add spices.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless Mama, Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice, The French Market Maven

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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日本語のブログ
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