Tag Archives: Char Siu

Tsurutaya San’s Char Siu Pork at Aoi Beer Stand in Shizuoka City!

Service: Easy-going and friendly
Facilities: Very clean overall. Beautiful washroom inside Den Bulding.
Prices: Reasonable
Strong points: Craft beers only!

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I had a very f\good reason to visit Aoi Beer Stand in Aoi Ku, Shizuoka City today!
They started serving a great snack: Char siu/叉燒/チャーシュー made by Mr. Tsurutaya in Shizuoka City!
Actually, Mr. Tsurutaya is in the process of moving his ramen restaurant to Aoi Ku. I shall be able to pay him a visit soon!

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The char siu!

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Incidentally the beer I had with my char siu was a Pale Ale brewed by Minoo Brewery/箕面 いんOsaka City!

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Now, this elegant char siu concocted by Mr. Tsurutaya is not your run-of-the-mill foodstuff.
This is a real delicacy, tender, juicy, tasty and quite healthy in fact!
Perfect with beer!

AOI BEER STAND
Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Miyuki Cho, 4-6, Den bill, 1F
Tel.: 054-260-5203
Opening hours: 11:00~23:00
Credit cards OK
FACEBOOK

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Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

Japanese Gastronomy: Char Siu/Chyashyu-Basic Recipe

Charsiu Pork (Chinese-flavored Barbecued Pork)
Origin
Alternative name(s) chasu, cha siu, chashao, and char siew, barbecued meat
Place of origin China
Region or state Chinese-speaking areas, Japan, Southeast Asia
Details
Main ingredient(s) Pork, mixture of honey, five-spice powder, fermented tofu (red), dark soy sauce, hoisin sauce, and sherry or rice wine

Char siu (also spelled chasu, cha siu, chashao, and char siew), otherwise known as barbecued meat (usually pork) in China or Chinese-flavored barbecued meat outside China, is a popular way to flavor and prepare pork in Cantonese cuisine. It is classified as a type of siu mei, Cantonese roasted meat. It is listed at number 28 on World’s 50 most delicious foods readers’ poll compiled by CNN Go in 2011.
That is for the wikipedia information.

But the Japanese also have their own recipes and her is the basic one:

INGREDIENTS:

As this is the basic recipe, I will explain the procedure only. I will leave it to you to decide on the exact amounts as priorities are vastly different!

-Pork Belly
-Salt
-Twine
-Sesame seeds
-Seven Spices/Shichimi/七味
-Thin leeks
-Large leeks
-Garlic
-Light taste soy sauce
-Japanese sake
-Laurel

RECIPE:

Choose a block of pork belly with the right proportion of meat and fat.
Personally, I ctually prefer blocks cut out the thighs or back.

Make a few shallow cuts across the pork and salt it lightly. That step will ensure an even seasoning.

Bind the pork with cooking twine as shown in above picture with the fatty side outside.
Bind it tightly as to effectively shape the pork.

As the char siu has to be boiled first, prepare a large enough pan filled with water.
Drop the meat into the water.
Add just a drop of soy sauce, one clove of garlic, two leaves of laurel, some roughly cut leeks (thick variety), some Japanese sake and bring to boil.

Boil over a strong fire for one hour, scooping unwanted matters and scum from time to time.
Bear in mind the boiling water can be used as soupstock for other dishes!
Once taken out of the pan, let it cool and cut the twine. The meat should hold by itself.
It can be consumed as it is.

The Japanese then grill it (aburi/炙り) for an even deeper taste.

They use a special grill called nanarin/七輪 using charcoal.
Take care not to overgrill it and bear in mind oil could start flying!

Cut the char siu to the thickness wanted.
I like it very thin and eat it a it is. But when using it for ramen, I might cut it a bit thicker.

If you want to it eat and serve it for its own sake, cut many slices and arrange them on a serving dish and season it with seven spices mix/shichimi/七味, sesame seeds (whole or ground), chopped thin leeks, and a little ponzu.

Doesn’t that look appetizing!

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Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Ramen: Cold Ramen/Hiyashi Ramen-Basic Recipe

Ramen are not always eaten hot, even in cold countries (japan does become very cold in some areas in winter, I can guarantee you!).
Be it hot or cold, Cold Ramen, Hiyashi Ramen/冷やしラーメンare a very popular dish here.

Whereas the presentation basically varies little, many sauces can be combined with them
Here is the basic (classic) recipe with some different sauces.
I have left the precise quantities again to your preferences. I sincerely hope it will help!

INGREDIENTS:

-Main ingredients:
Cucumber
Beansprouts
Dried shiitake
Char Siu/Chyashyu
Ramen

-Peanuts sauce
Peanuts butter
Soy sauce
Seasme oil
Rice vinegar
Salt
Water

-Hot Sauce
Doubanjiang (chinese), Toubanjian (Japanese), Gochujang (Korean)
Soy sauce
Sesame oil
Rice vinegar
Japanese sake
Water

-Sweet vinegar sauce:
Sugar
Soy sauce
Sesame sauce
Rice vinegar
Japanese sake
Water

RECIPE:

Cucumbers:
Choose the short, crispy Japanese variety.
First massage them with salt.
Wash them under cold clear water.
Slice along their length at a slant and cut the slices into long thin strips.

Beansprouts:
Do choose them fresh for best taste.
Plunge them into hot water and stir them a while.
Drain them thoroughly and let cool completely.

Dried Shiitake:
Let the shiitake swell backto their original soft size in lukewarm water.
Boil them for 5 minutes then.
Drain thoroughly and let cool down before slicing them thin.

Char Siu/Chyashyu:
See recipe HERE.
Cut as much as you want into thin strips.
If unavailable, ham is fine.

Peanuts sauce:
Do experiment with quantities. Have a good look at picture, too!
In a bowl, mix soy sauce and peanuts butter (the less sweet kind if osiible) until you attain a creamy sauce.

Add sesame oil and a little and mix well again.

Add some water and mix well (to lighten it).
Add a little rice vinegar for seasoning and mix well again.
Pour the sauce into a mortar. Add sesame seeds and crush/mix with a pestle.
Depending on your preferences, you can add chili pepper, or a drop of tabasco.
By all means, experiment!
If the taste seems a little bland, add rice vinegar and soy sauce.

Hot sauce:
In a bowl drop Doubanjian, Japanese sake, soy sauce, rice vinegar, sesame oil and water. Mix well!
Once again, do experiment!
You may add liquid lard for a deeper taste.

Sweet vinegar sauce:
in a bowl drop soy sauce, sugar, rice vinegar, Japanese sake, sesame oil and water. Mix well.
Once again, do experiment!
If sauce is too thick, add water.

In a large pan bring to boil plenty of water with a little salt.
Throw in the ramen after having made sure they don’t stick to each other.
Control the heat so as not bringing the water back to boiling point.
Cook until slightly hard or very firm.

First drain thouroughly, then wash under cold running water.
Drain again thoroughly.
To prevent the ramen from sticking to each other, add a little sesame oil and mix well.
Boil the ramen after all the other ingredients are ready for fast and best sevice.

Place the ramen in the middle of a plate and cover them with cucumber, beansprouts, shiitake and char siu as decoratively as possible and serve with sauce in a separate dish.

NOTES/POINTS:

-Many restaurants serve the cold ramen seasoned with their sauce. This is not a very good idea as the ramen will end up impregnated and softened.
Add sauce little by little with a small spoon from the sauce dish. It might take more time, but it will far more delicious.

-You can of course use other ingredients as far as the vegetables are concerned. Let your imagination fly. Just make sure they are cut in strips all apprimately the same size!

-The Japanese often add hot mustard just before eating them Experiment!

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Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Japanese Cuisine: Char Siu/Chyashyu Basic Recipe

Posted by Shizuoka Gourmet

I was going to write on article on Cold Japanese Ramen/Hiyasi Ramen/冷やしラーメン when I realized I would have to introduce one main element first, namely Chyashyu (in Japanese) or Char Siu (in Chinese).

Therefore, here is the basic Japanese-style Char Siu recipe before I can introduce the one on Hiyashi Ramen!

INGREDIENTS:

As this is the basic recipe, I will explain the procedure only. I will leave it to you to decide on the exact amounts as priorities are vastly different!

-Pork Belly
-Salt
-Twine
-Sesame seeds
-Seven Spices/Shichimi/七味
-Thin leeks
-Large leeks
-Garlic
-Light taste soy sauce
-Japanese sake
-Laurel

RECIPE:

Choose a block of pork belly with the right proportion of meat and fat.
Personally, I ctually prefer blocks cut out the thighs or back.

Make a few shallow cuts across the pork and salt it lightly. That step will ensure an even seasoning.

Bink the pork with cooking twine as shown in above picture with the fatty side outside.
Bind it tightly as to effectively shape the pork.

As the char siu has to be boiled first, prpare a large enough pan filled with water.
Drop the meat in the water.
Add just a drop of soy sauce, one clove of garlic, two leaves of laurel, some roughly cut leeks (thick variety), some Japanese sake and bring to boil.

Boil over a strong fire for one hour, scooping unwanted matters from time to time.
Bear in mind the boiling water can be used as soupstock for other dishes!
Once taken out of the pan, let it cool and cut the twine. The meat should hold by itself.
It can be consumed as it is.

The Japanese then grill it (aburi/炙り) for even deeper taste.

They use a special grill called nanarin/七輪 using charcoal.
take care not to overgrill it and bear in mind oil could start flying!

Cut the char siu to the thickness wanted.
I like it very thin and eat it a it is. But when using for ramen, I might cut it a bit thicker.

If you want to it eat and serve it for its own sake, cut many slices and arrange them on a serving dish and season it with seven spices mix/shichimi/七味, sesame seeds (whole or ground), chopped thin leeks, a little ponzu.

Doesn’t that look appetizing!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Bread + Butter, Comestilblog, Greedy Girl, Bouchon For 2, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Mangantayon, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles, Lexi, Culinary Musings, Eats and Everything, Bite Me New England, Heather Sweet, Warren Bobrow, 5 Star Foodie, Frank Fariello, Oyster Culture, Ramendo, Alchemist Chef, Ochikeron, Mrs. Lavendula, The Gipsy Chef, Spirited Miu Flavor, Wheeling Gourmet, Chef de Plunge, Island Vittles, Beffuddled Canuck

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

—————————————-
日本語のブログ
—————————————-