Vegan Japanese Recipe: Eggplants Agedashi

Eggplants or Aubergines or Nasu/茄子 in Japanese are a very popular vegetable in Japan whose people have many recipes of their own that would satisfy many vegans and vegetarians worldwide.
These recipes are simple and the ingredients should be easy to obtain!
Agedashi/揚げだし is atrditional cooking technique in Japan that combines frying/pan-frying/deep-frying/Age-揚げ and a soupstock/dasi-出し.
Check this vegan recipe for Japanese dashi first!

Eggplants Agedashi/nasu Agedashi/茄子揚げだし

INGREDIENTS (for 2~3 people)

Eggplants: 2
Fresh ginger: 1 cut 2×3 cm
Dashi/soupstock: 100cc (1/2 cup)
Soy sauce: 1 + 2/3 tablespoons (25cc)
Mirin/sweet sake if unavailable sake + sugar or dry white wine + sugar): 1 + 1/2 teaspoon (12.5 cc)

RECIPE

Prepare the soup stock in a pan for immediate use later by pouring in the dashi soupstock, soy sauve and mirin.

Do not peel the eggplants.
Cut off both ends and cut in halves.
Then make shallow indents with a shrp knife every 2 or 3 mm. This will not only make the skin easy to eat but also allow all the ingredients to “sink in/imbibe” the eggplants!

Fry in shallow oil at 160~170 degrees Celsius.
Turn them over from time to time.

Fry for 2 minutes so that the eggplants attain a nice color.
Take out of oil immediately.

Place the eggplants in a serving dsh while they are hot (improtant!) and pour the heated dashi aver them.
Place grated fresh ginger on top and serve!

Great with beer!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Vegan Japanese Recipe: Eggplants Pan-fried with Ground Black Sesame Seeds

Eggplants or Aubergines or Nasu/茄子 in Japanese are a very popular vegetable in Japan whose people have many recipes of their own that would satisfy many vegans and vegetarians worldwide.
These recipes are simple and the ingredients should be easy to obtain!
The present recipe makes use of black sesame seeds, that is roasted sesame seeds!
Apparently they are not so easy to find in Europe, which is a real pity!

INGREDIENTS (for 4 people)

Although we can buy ground black sesame seeds in Japanese markets, buy it whole and grind some just before cooking!
Great taste and flavor and so rich in nutrients!

Eggplants: 6 (long variety)
Ground black sesame seeds: 60 g
Japanese sake: 100 cc (1/2 cup). If unavailable use dry white wine!
Mirin/Japanese sweet sake: 50 cc (1/4 cup) If unavailable use very sweet white wine!
Soy sauce: 1 tab;espoon
Sugar: as appropriate
Water: 100 cc (1/2 cup)
Vegetable oil: as appropriate

RECIPE

Do not peel the eggplants.
Cut lengthwise in four, and then in halves across.
Remember that eggplants absorb oil so do not hesitate to use a lot of the latter!

Fry the eggplants.
When the eggplants have become soft and absorbed most of the oil, first add all the ingredients except the sugar and water. Fry for a while. Add the sugar and keep frying for a while.

Mix well and add the water. Turn the fire low and fry/cook until the juices have become very thick.
Switch off fire and let cool completely.

As this dish is very tasty cold, make a big batch and chill inside the refrigerator!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Japanese Gastronomy Traditions: O-Tooshi, Tsuki-Dashi, First Snack with First Drink at Izakayas

Celery and seaweed fried in sake at Yasaitei

Non-Japanese are always surprised to see a light food dish coming automatically with the ifrst drink ordered at most izakayas in Japan.
It is called O-Tooshi/お通し or Tsuki-Dashi/突き出し in Japanese.
It is a tradition in Japan, but misunderstandings may arise as you will be billed for it.
It is not complimentary. In the latter case, the owner or staff will clearly say” Saabisu desu!/サービスです!On the house!”.
Now, why such a tradition, definitely somewhat alien to Westerners?
There are two ways to consider it, the positive way and the negative way.
Like bad and good surprises let me start with the negative way, although I’ve learnt not to be so in this country!

Vegetables, wakame and octopus o-hitashi at Yasaitei

The negative way:

The izakaya can adapt/arrange/recreate leftovers of the previous day/night and serve them for a profit.
It replaces the notorious “cover charge” in clubs and bars.
The unscrupulous izakaya (and that includes big chains in general!) can serve dead cheap food (frozen edamame and the like imported from China) and make an immediate profit especially if the establishement is large and busy.
You may refuse right away the o-tooshi or tsuki-dashi by immediately saying “o-tooshi Katto shite kudasai/お通しカットして下さい!” but you will have to be quick and you will establish a durable tight-fisted reputation among your Japanese friends or colleagues although Westerners might judge you as a sharp guy/lass…
Mind you, there are times when I do feel tp leave the thing untouched and point out later that I didn’t order or eat it, but you must be fluent in Japanese… In any case, I do not patronize such profiteering establishments!

Spicy edamame o-hitashi at Yasaitei

The positive way:

On the other hand, the real and honest, if still driven by economic reasons, purpose is:
First to enable customers to enjoy some food with their first drink while their orders are processed. After all for all the drink you might consume you still have chosen the place for its food (unless you are gravely mistaken!)!
Second, the o-tooshi will give you a very faithful idea of the level and skills of the izakaya (unless you are absolutely unlucky or made yourself a nuisance!).

Grilled kampachi/Amberjack with zucchini and tomato puree at Yasaitei

I personally make a rule to remember and record the o-tooshi served to me at my favorite (and expensive) izakaya and Japanese restaurants. They actually make for great gastronomic study and research. After all, a good establishment will rarely serve the same o-tooshi two days running!

Here are some samples collected in my favorite haunts:

Pan-fried spicy lotus roots and tuna at Hana Oto

Various o-tooshi at Takano

Tuna tartatre at Sushi Ko

Buckwheat tofu with kinako powder at Setsugekka Soba Restaurant

Sake-steamed cockles ar narusei Tempura Restaurant

Seared tuna at Waga

Next time you visit a japanese Izakaya or restaurant you will understand why the first impression is always so important!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Vegan Japanese Recipe: Eggplants Pan-fried with Basil and Amazu!

Eggplants or Aubergines or Nasu/茄子 in Japanese are a very popular vegetable in Japan whose people have many recipes of their own that would satisfy many vegans and vegetarians worldwide.
These recipes are simple and the ingredients should be easy to obtain!
The present recipe is a bit of a crossover between Asia and Europe!
Amazu/甘酢 means sweet Japanese rice vinegar! If you don’t have any use rice vinegar and some honey!

Eggplants Pan-fried with Basil and Amazu/Nasu to Bajiru no Amazu Itame/茄子とバジルの甘酢炒め!

INGREDIENTS: (for 4 people)

Eggplants/Aubergines: 4
Rice vinegar: 30 cc(1/6 of a cup)
Cane sugar: 1 tablespoon
(If you use amazu, count 40 cc~1/4 of a cup)
Salt: 1/2 teaspoon
Olive oil: 50cc (1/4 of a cup)
Basil leaves : 5~6 large leaves

RECIPE:

Cut all the eggplants in bite size pieces and fry in olive oil on a low~medium fire.

Fry eggplants until they have softened completely.
Add salt, rice vinegar and cane sugar (or amazu) and keep stirring and frying until juices have completely evaporated.

Once the eggplants have attained a stewed aspect, switch off fire, add finley chopped basil and mix.
Serve hot. Great atop freshly steamed rice!

You can also let it cool down and chill it inside refrigerator for a nice snack to accompany beer!

Once again, so simple!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Bryan Baird’s Newsletter (2012/07/18): Fish-Tap 12-Year Annivesary Celebration

Baird Beer & Taproom Events Bulletin
bryan-sayuri.gif

Fish-Tap 12-Year Annivesary Celebration

Dear Taproom Friend & Baird Beer Enthusiast:

Sayuri and I opened the Numazu Fishmarket Taproom twelve years ago this week, on July 20, 2000. I will never forget that day. We were filled with nervous energy and driven by a keenly motivating fear — a sort of fear that I had never experienced before. The first customers of the day were, to no one’s surprise, the carpenter, Nagakura-san, and his wife Shoko-chan. Their presence was both calming and reassuring. The first beer poured was Hoegaarden White (Baird Beer wasn’t available until January, 2001); the first food delivered was Sayuri’s parmesan chicken salad. We were officially in the restaurant and beer business!

It has been a long and winding, arduous but enjoyable journey. I have said this on many occasions but it’s worth repeating: our greatest pride has always been the extreme high quality of our Taproom customer base. We are deeply appreciative of the sincere and loyal patronage of our Taproom customer-friends. Thank you for your long-time support and friendship. You are an integral part of the Baird Beer family.

*Numazu Fishmarket Taproom 12-Year Anniversary Celebration (Friday-Sunday, July 20-22):

We will be celebrating the Fish Tap’s 12th birthday this coming weekend, which appropriately enough, kicks off on July 20. Doors open at 5:00 pm on Friday, noon on Saturday and Sunday. Weekend party highlights include:

Debut of two special commemorative brews: Fish-Tap 12-Year Summer Ale and Fire in the Belly — Doug’s Red Ale.
Special food and beer menu with all items priced at 500 yen. We will be selling weekend Baird Beer and food cards with twelve stamps for 5,000 yen (12 beer and/or food items for the price of 10). The cards are valid exclusively at the Fishmarket Taproom and only during the three-day celebration (July 20-22).
Saturday and Sunday outdoor BBQ at the brewery (1:00 – 6:00 pm). Chris M will be grilling up burgers, dogs and homemade sausages as well as pouring a variety of specially cellared seasonal Baird Beers. Beer and food cards can be used at the outdoor barbecue.
Baird Brewery Tours: Brewer-guided brewery tours will be held both on Saturday and Sunday at the following times — 12:30, 2:30 and 4:30. Tours are open to all interested patrons.
CODE reunion concert — 7:00 pm kick-off Saturday evening.
New Baird Beer Seasonal Releases:
In conjunction with our Fish-Tap birthday celebration, we are releasing two commemorative seasonal ales to the broader market. Each is available both in kegs and bottles (360 ml); shipments will begin Thursday, July 19.

*Fire in the Belly — Doug’s Red Ale (6%):

Doug Benning was what we would consider a ‘founding customer’ in our Fishmarket Taproom. He first made an appearance the second or third weekend of our operation, visiting together with his wife, Miyuki, and fellow ‘founding customer’, Jason Block. That Doug was a curiously inquisitive and passionate person was revealed to Sayuri and me within minutes. That he was to be a life-long fan of the Taproom and Baird Beer, a future owner-partner in our business, and, most of all, an intimate and fiercely loyal friend, become apparent over the coming months and years.

Sadly, Doug passed away several weeks ago in a fashion as sudden as his life was intense. I understood Doug’s intensity perhaps better than most; we shared what my mother would have called ‘fire in the belly.’ We love Doug and Fire in the Belly is our beer memorial to him.

Fire in the Belly is an explosively flavorful ale, richly malty with a biting hop character. The aroma is spicy and peppery and comes courtesy of dry-hopping with four varieties: Chinook, Cascade, Motueka and Santiam. If Doug were here to toast his beloved Fish-Tap, this undoubtedly would be the beer with which he would do so.

*Fish-Tap 12-Year Summer Ale (4.5%):

There is a word for July in Numazu — sultry. The best antidote that I know to the heat and humidity, other than a dip in Suruga Bay, is a tall pint of a crisp and sprite, light yet flavorful session ale. This is what our 12-Year Summer Ale happens to be. 11.4 Plato of malty goodness (including strategic additions of rye, caramel-wheat and un-malted wheat) is combined with 15 BU of hop crispness to produce an exquisitely clean and refreshing brew. The floral nose comes courtesy of dry-hopping with a combination of Tradition, East Kent Golding, Santiam, Saaz, and Styrian Golding.

Please plan to join Sayuri, John and me, and our entire brewery and Fish-Tap team for a celebration of beer and friends and life and happiness, all of which will be abundantly present.

Cheers,

Bryan Baird

Baird Brewing Company
Numazu, Japan
HOMEPAGE

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Vegan Japanese Recipe: Eggplants with Sesame and Soy Sauce!

Eggplants or Aubergines or Nasu/茄子 in Japanese are a very popular vegetable in Japan whose people have many recipes of their own that would satisfy many vegans and vegetarians worldwide.
These recipes are simple and the ingredients should be easy to obtain!

Eggplants in sesame and soy sauce/Nasu No Goma Shouyuu Abura Ae/なすのごま油醤油あえ

INGREDIENTS (for 2 people)

Eggplants: 4 comparatively small
Cornstarch: 2 teaspoons

For the sauce/tare/タレ:
Sesame oil: 1 teaspoon
Rice vinegar: 2 teaspoons
Soy sauce; 2 teaspoons
Leek (finely chopped): 1/4
Chili pepper powder: as appropriate

RECIPE

Peel the eggplants with a peeler

Coat the eggplants with cornstrach.
Steam the eggplants in a steamer or cover the dish with cellophane paper and cook in the microwave oven for 5 minutes.

Mix all the sauce/tare ingredients well in a bowl.

Puncture the eggplants with a thin fork or toothpick.
Leave the eggplants in the sauce bowl.
Turn the eggplants in the sauce well to let them absorb it as much as possible.
Serve lukewrm or at room temperature.

Easy, isn’t it?

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Summer Italian Truffles at Soloio in Shizuoka City!

Service: Pro and very friendly
Equipment & Facilities: Great overall cleanliness and superb washroom
Prices: Reasonable
Strong points: Fresh local ingredients whenever possible. Both traditional and inventive Italian cuisine. Good wine list at moderate prices. Open late!

Summer is a great season when it comes to mushrooms!
No wonder that Solio is offering Italian Summer Truffles on its menu, and this at a very reasonable price!

They were clearly stated on the seasonal carte inserted inside the regular menu!

Proud Chef Takehiko Katoh/加藤武彦 and Sommelier Mieko Ozawa/小澤美恵子!

But before we sampled these beautiful black jewels there were other morsels to take care of to satisfy our appetites!

Tuna tartare!

So light and so succulent! Heavens for any fish lover!

Solio has a constant array of anitpasti you can’t escape from: Shrimps and octopus!

And so elegantly served!

On a bed of superb carpaccio of sole!

Beautiful octopus!

By then it was time to indulge in the truffles!

On white asparaguses!

Solio serves simply the best rizotto in the Prefecture!

Extravagant Summer Truffles risotto!

For once we skipped dessert and finished with coffee…

Actually, the home-made crostini made for a nice little dessert! LOL

To be continued…

To be continued…

SOLOIO
420-0858 Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Tenmacho, 9-7, Kita, 1
Tel./fax: 054-260-4637
Business hours: 16:00~24:00
Closed on Monday
Credit cards OK
Private parties welcome!
Smoking allowed BUT Non-smoking until 20:00 everyday!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery