Tag Archives: 鶏肉

Vegetarian French Lunch with Shizuoka Ingredients at Tetsuya SUGIMOTO (2010/10/28)

Ranking
Service: Highly professional and friendly
Equipment: Great overall cleanliness. Beautiful washroom
Prices:~
Strong points:Freshest produce and ingredients only, mainly from Shizuoka Prefecture. Organic vegetables. Seasonal food only

Map (Japanese)
Entirely non-smoking!

I have to keep regularly to Tetsuya Sugimoto Restaurant as his ingredients are seasonal and nothing else!
As today is practical for a light lunch I visited him a bit late on purpose to have ample time to report. Tetsuya does not mind at all and actually always welcome the chat!

As there was no real local meat around, we kept it purely to vegetables.
He didn’t say he had that many form Shizuoka, only to show a dozen Tupperware to choose from!
Now, the mushrooms above are wild ones from Fujinomiya City’s vicinity at the foot of Mount Fuji!
They are called “Shougenji” mushrooms. And these were bigger than the cultivated variety!

Tetsuya Sugimoto is quickly turning into the Alain Passard of Shizuoka!
So he started “shopping” among the incredible (and he said small!) array of his vegetables.
The above are organic chayottes (hayato uri in Japanese)f from Hamamatsu.

His vegetables and all other ingredients are stored with such great care!

Now, can you guess what this vegetable might be? If you can, you owe my respect as this was a first for me!

Rice stalks or “ine” in Japanese. These are grown that thick on Amagi Plateau in Izu Peninsula!. The thick core is very easy to cook!

Look at these! All from Shizuoka Prefecture and organic to boot!

The other vegetables included:
Lotus root (“renkon” in Japanese, slightly boiled preserved in its own water) from Asabata, Shizuoka City
Winged Bean (“Shikaku Mame”) from Hamamatsu City
White and violet “Mabiki” Daikon, Tsurumurasaki and Carrot (“Ninjin”), all from Matsuki Biofarm at the foot of Mount Fuji!

The vegetables were first slowly fried with some white butter and a minimum of water and covered with a lid to prevent the juices to evaporate.

The vegetables were taken out in order according to their size and softness.
A minimum amount of water was added from time to time to help the larger vegetables to cook properly.

A lttle butter was added to liaise the sauce made up of the vegetables juices only as well as a little salt and a little lemon vinegar. Nothing else!

In front of me!

From another angle!

Testuya told he is going to scour the Izu Peninsula in search for seaweed varieties (Shizuoka has the largest number of varieties in Japan!) to create a vegetarian marine cuisine!

Tetsuya SUGIMOTO
420-0038 Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Umeya,, 2-13,1F
Tel./Fax: 054-251-3051
Opening hours:11:30~14:30,17:30~21:30
Holidays: undecided
Cedit cards OK
HOMEPAGE

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Chrisoscope

Please check the new postings at:
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French Gastronomy with Shizuoka Ingredients: “Shamo” Chicken at Tetsuya SUGIMOTO

Ranking
Service: Highly professional and friendly
Equipment: Great overall cleanliness. Beautiful washroom
Prices:~
Strong points:Freshest produce and ingredients only, mainly from Shizuoka Prefecture. Organic vegetables. Seasonal food only

Map (Japanese)
Entirely non-smoking!

I suppose I will have to repeat myself again and again, but If you happen to visit Shizuoka City, you will find many restaurants and izakayas serving and mainly using produce/products and ingredients from Shizuoka Prefecture. There are many treasures to be discovered in this hoard!
One of them is the French restaurant going by the name of Tetsuya SUGIMOTO!

Now, Mr. Sugimoto is always looking for the best and the best only in our Prefecture.
This particular dish was made with a superb chicken called “Shamo/軍鶏, more precisely Ikkoku shamo/一黒軍鶏, a variety of Shamo Chicken raised in Central and Western Shizuoka Prefecture.

Male Ikkoku Shamo Chicken.

Female Ikokku Shamo Chicken.
The latter certainly deserves her name of “black” Shamo!

M. Sugimoto used chicken raised in Makinohara/牧の原 in the south-central part of our Prefecture.
These chickens are fed along very strict rules, with only natural feed. Their coops are at least 1 meter above soil and maintained as the healthiest environment as possible.
They are culled usually at 130 days when they reach 4 kg for the best quality.

Their meat has no “fibers” or unwanted smell.
Their meat contains less water and more nutrients than usual chicken. They can be served raw as sashimi in all safety.
Their flesh is extraordinarily tender and soft. and their skin delicious when fried thin and crispy.

From another angle!

Mr. Sugimoto first fried thick breast slices on their skins over a thick skillet and then finished them in the oven.
The sauce was made with the juices of the chicken, wild mushrooms and Sherry vinegar.
The mushrooms are all wild Japanese mushrooms!
A superb dish for the Fall/Autumn!

Tetsuya SUGIMOTO
420-0038 Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Umeya,, 2-13,1F
Tel./Fax: 054-251-3051
Opening hours:11:30~14:30,17:30~21:30
Holidays: undecided
Cedit cards OK
HOMEPAGE

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Chrisoscope

Please check the new postings at:
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Japanese Cuisine: Stewed Sato Imo, Koyadofu & Chicken

Japanese cuisine makes for some very healthy food.
I have already introduce koyadofu, a variety of dried tofu, sato imo or taro.
Here is a simple and hearty recipe fir for any age group!

INGREDIENTS: For 3~4 people

-Chicken thigh meat: 1 thigh
-Soy sauce: 1 tablespoon
-Japanese sake: 1 tablespoon (if unavailable use dry white wine)
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-Sato Imo/taro: 8 (medium-sized)
-Koyadofu: 3 standard sheets
-Flour: as appropriate
-Dashi: 2 cups/400 cc/ml (if unavailable use chicken soupstock)
-Soy sauce: 2.5 tablepoons
-japanese sake: 2.5 tablespoons
-Sugar: 2.5 tablespoons
-Shungiku: Spring chrysanthemum a little (if not available, use green of your choice!)

RECIPE:

-Cut the chickeninto small bite-sized chunks amd marinate with soy sauce and Japanese sake.

-Cut the hard part of the shungiku (or other green leaf vegetable such as soinach, and so on), boil lightly in salted water, drain and cut into 5 cm (2 inches) bits.

-Peel sato imo/taro as shown on above pic. Boil. Clean in clear water to get rid of the stickiness. Transfer into a zaru/sieve basket.

-Soften koyadofu in lukewarm water. Press out all water. Cut into 1.5 cm (0.7 inch) squares and coat with flour. Deep-fry in oil at 160 degrees Celsius. Scoop out as soon as they change color. Tansfer into a sieve basket and pour hot water on it to take out excess oil.

-In a pan, drop the dashi, soy sauce, sake and sugar. Bring slowly to boil and reduce fire to low. Add sato imo/taro and koyadofu. Simmer for a while on a low fire to allow all sato imo and koyadofu to absorb taste.

-In another pan bring some water to boil. Wipe chicken off any humidity. Coat with flour. Drop into boiling water and cook until tender.

-Once cooked, transfer into sieve basket/zaru.

-Once the sato imo and koyadofu are cooked to satisfaction, add chicken. Simmer for 2=3 minutes.

-Serve into dish with greens.

Great with beer!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat

Please check the new postings at:
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Shamo Chicken from Umegashima at Pissenlit

Service: excellent and very friendly
Facilities: great washroom, great cleanliness overall
Prices: reasonable, good value.
Strong points: Interesting wine list. Great use of local products.
no-smoking-logoentirely non-smoking!

This is the “second part” of my previous lunch at Pissenlit.
As it is not fit for vegans or vegetarians, I kept separate, although organic vegetables do figure in this great gastronomic experience!

As for the meat, it is roasted chicken.
But the chicken is very special: Of the shamo/軍鶏 variety, it is some some of the best chicken available in this country.
Moreover, it was kept in a natural habitat in Umegashima, up in the mountains near the source of the Abe River, and fed only with natural food.

As for the vegetables, they are all organic.
The onions on the zucchini slice are confit, and the sauce is Provencal in concept with high quality EV oil and local tomatoes, garlic, and so forth.

The chicken breast with its skin roasted to crunchy perfection was placed atop a grilled slice of aubergine with Okahijiki, Komatsuna and Morokko Ingen/large string beans, all organically grown in Mishima City by Mr. Hideyaki Hirooka.

An “internal” view of the dish!

PISSENLIT
420-0839 Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Takajo, 2-3-4
Tel.: 054-270-8768
Fax: 054-627-3868
Business hours: 11:30~14:30; 17:00~22:00
Closed on Tuesdays and Sunday evening
Homepage (Japanese)
Credit Cards OK

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Chrisoscope

Please check the new postings at:
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Japanese Cuisine: Sauteed Chicken

Japanese Cuisine: Sauteed Chicken

The Japanese have a very healthy and tasty way of sauteeing very fresh high grade chicken.
It is simple, but not necessarily cheap as the chicken must of the best quality for such a recipe, but it certainly makes for great presentation!

INGREDIENTS: For one person

-1 large chicken breast with the skin
-Freshly grated and pressed daikon: 1 cup
-Finely chopped leeks: 1/2 cup (choose a fresh and tender leek!)
-Salt and pepper: as appropriate.
-Ponzu: 1/4 cup (if not available, use very light taste soy sauce with a dash of lemon juice)
-Chili pepper powder: as appropriate

RECIPE:

-Season chicken with a little salt and pepper if you wish to. Not much, please!

-Punch holes in the chicken skin with the point of a knife.

-Heat a non-stick frying pan.

-Place the chicken breast skin down on the frying pan. Do nout use oil!

-When the skin starts sizzling, cover with a glass lid and lower fire to medium-low.

-Cook until the chicken is cooked on top and that the skin has turned a nice crispy dark brown.

-Get a long serving individual dish ready.

-Taking care not to burn yourself, transfer the chicken breast onto a working table and cut into slices.

-Transfer the sliced chicken breast onto the serving plate with the slices touching each other in the shape of the initial chicken breast.

-Pour the ponzu all over it. Top the whole first with the grated daikon and then the chopped leeks as shown in above picture.
Last sprinkle with chili pepper powder.

Great with beer or Japanese sake!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi; Happy Little Bento

Japanese Appetizers at Tomii, Shizuoka City

A Japanese restaurant worth its salt will always an array of appetizers ready for its customers in a hurry or not having enough time to enjoy a full meal. Moreover, they will be exclusively seasonal. They are certainly the mark of the restaurant for all to remember.

I harbour no worry whatsoever when I visit Tomii in Shizuoka City in a rush. I actually look forward to savour their tidbits of the day!
Alright, here is what I had the other night:

I was certainly in a hurry and I’m afraid the pics slightly suffered from it!
From left to right:
“Shiromi sakana to jagaimo agemono”/White fish and potato deep-fried dumpling.
“Yuri”/lily bulb. The petals are first lightly boiled then marinated in sweet umeboshi vinegar and finally cut to shape.
“Endo mame tamagoyaki”/ Japanese omelette made with eggs and green peas.
“Komochi Konbu”/Herring roe pressed with konbu seaweed.

“Aka Konnyaku”?red Devil’s Tongue tuber jelly.
“Warabi”/western bracken fern, boiled.
“Komochi Konbu”/Herring roe pressed with konbu seaweed.
“Petit Vert/kimizu dare”/Petit Vert lettuce with sauce mde with egg yolk and sweet vinegar.

“Shirauo Karaage”/Ice goby deep-fried in a very light batter and seasoned with lemon juice. Simple and eminently tasty!

For a closer view: can you see their eyes?

Shizuoka Prefecture produces 50% of “Himono/Sun-dried fish” in all Japan! These three were caught in Suruga Bay, just off our city!

Top centre: “Tachiuo”/Scabbard fish grilled with sesame seeds.
Left: “Seguro Iwashi”/Black back sardines, also grilled with sesame seeds.
Right: “Choosia Fugu”/ A small variety of globefish, grilled and seasoned with grate lime zest.

Looking forward to my next visit!

TOMII
Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Tokiwa-cho, 1-2-7, Tomii Bldg, 1F
Tel.: 054-274-0666
Business hours: 17:00~22:00
Closed on Sundays
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Bento Boutique, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento

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Wild Blue Fin Tuna Catch Ban: So What?

-Bottom left: “honmaguro/本鮪/Kuromaguro/黒鮪”, blue fin tuna from Oma (Aomori Prefecture), chu-toro/semi-fat part.
-Top left: O-toro/belly fat part of same fish
-Bottom centre: “Aori Ika/あおり烏賊, Great Fin Reef Squid from Suruga Bay in Shizuoka Prefecture.
-Bottom right: Akami/lean part from same tuna.
(Picture taken at Sushi Ko, Shizuoka City, Japan)

For all his own research done the old iconoclast geezer once again runs the risk of being lambasted for tackling head on incrasingly poltically incorrect issues…

Attempting to show the larger picture as recently done with whalemeat and suplements certainly struck the wrong chord in some circles, be they faithful friends or avowed enemies.
On the other hand such vital issues as marine and fish stock preservation and replenishement have failed to attract expected comments.

It seems that food is slowly becoming a bone of contention whereas for eons shared meals and drinks were considered the birth and proof of culture in any so-called civilized country or nation.
Moreover, this divisive state of affairs is being further exarcerbated by populist politicians seizing the opportunity for an easy vote gain. Has smoke-belching Arnie ever seen the geese and ducks queueing for more food? Has he ever witnessed the conditions chicken are kept before being served in cartons at KFC diners?
Only very recently a group of politically and religiously-motivated group of vegans have threatened me with a concerted internet attack if I did not mendmy ways immediately (they forgot I can use a spam filtering box…).
Considering personal efforts in featuring regular vegan recipes and information on vegetables and fruits, I was slightly disappoited with the utter lack of tolerance (and civility).
It won’t be mong until a violence-prone activist is arrested for running a bullozer into the the house of a famer who had dared mistreating a cow into giving her milk to make cheese.

japan bashing in all fields has become an increasingly fashionable way to make people forget far more pressing issues.
But the same people are forgetting the resilience and ingenuity of the inhabitants of this island nation. The Japanese kep quiet, bend their backs under the deluge and continue against overwhelming odds to produce arguably the best-balanced diet in this world. After all they are also the longest-living humans on the globe. Many conveniently tend to forget too easily that Japan is one, and probably the only one, of a few countries which can daily provide for all culinary tastes, be they vegan, vegetarian, halal, kosher, or plainly omnivore.

The Japanese also a great grasp of the future.
To cut a long story short, they were the first, and probably the only ones, to research and succeed in raising blue fin tuna from the egg. Such fish are now reaching the weight of 30 kg in Kagoshima Prefecture,and are fast closing to the same figure in Kinki and Tokai Marine Universities. Kagoshima blue fin tuna is already on sale at Parche Supermarket in Shizuoka City!
Businessmen have already registered blue fin tuna rasied at Tokai Marine University under the name of “Shimizu Toro”!

The Japanese don’t feel compelled to impose their views, laws and restrictions in the lands and seas of other nations, but they will be the first to export human-raised blue fin tuna abroad.
Consequently, the ban on wild blue fin tuna will have spawned the perverse result of Japan and importers abroad getting their hands on a new lucrative business!
I can see myself one day guiding rich foreign tourists on a sushi tour of Shizuoka, which not only raises its own blue fin tuna but is also blessed by a sea replete with the same fish!

Now, I totally agree that blue fin tuna catch, and that of any other fish for that matter, should be (have been) strictly regulated, but the present unilateral ban will only bring about two negative outcomes:
-on one hand, what is going to happen to all these fishermen and workers in harbours along the coasts of Spain, France, Italy, Greece, Morocco, Mauritania, Angola and the workers at Hunt’s Point, Boston?
-on the other hand, the same fishermen and workerswill have no other recourse left but but to catch more of the “lesser” tuna species to survive.

The vicious circle has only begun…

Unrelated at may sound, nobody seems to have the guts to question China and her fishermen who kill more than a million (yes, you read well!) sharkes for the sole benefit of cutting off their fins (the rest of the fish is callously thrown back into the sea).

I kept this posting short for the sake of impact, but I will gladly answer any comments as long as they are formulated in a polite, coherent and constructive manner. Otherwise they will be trown to the (remaining) sharks!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World, Palate To Pen, Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, Vegansarus

Please check the new postings at:
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