Tag Archives: Pottery

Robert Yellin’s Newsletter: Japanese Pottery by Yokoyama Naoki

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Framed photographs by Mishima photographer Okabe Minoru

Greetings from Mishima,

With autumn in the air in this part of our world, the senses are filled with glorious sights and smells as nature prepares for her winter hibernation. We hope this finds all well and also enjoying the season, whatever it may be where you are.

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Thanks so much to all who visited our recent Miyao Masahiro exhibition and we continue with the Bizen theme in a very different realm though, namely shizen-nerikomi or natural marbled Bizen. This is the world of Yokoyama Naoki.

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Our last Yokoyama exhibition was in May of 2006 and the works offered in the current exhibition were all fired very recently; I went down to his kiln on October 12th to select the works. Most of very much in an autumn tone-themed with rich oranges and browns created from the two or three different toned clay he uses. Yokoyama told me it takes 10 times more labor to make his shizen-nerikomi compared to regular Bizen. The forms range from very strong and stoic to more organic and natural; the larger rectangular forms acting as a canvas for the rich clay landscapes. Some of the cups and guinomi are of a black Bizen marbled type that was achieved by placing the works in
saggar-fire-proof casings and then adding charcoal towards the end of the firing. Each piece was carefully selected and as you’ll see in the following exhibition preview links Yokoyama is a superb Bizen ceramic artist taking Bizen in brilliant directions with his unique vision of marbled Bizen. (There are a few yohen Bizen and other non-marbled Bizen works to be seen as well.)

gui-all

Yokoyama (b.1970) lives in the hills of Bizen where he established his kiln in 2000. Before that he studied with Kawabata Fumio and at the Bizen Pottery Center. His works have been accepted into juried exhibitions that include the Tanabe Museum’s Contemporary Tea Forms exhibition, Okayama Prefecture Art exhibition, Japan Traditional Arts and Crafts Chugoku region exhibition, Japan Ceramic Art exhibition and the Japan Traditional Arts and Crafts National exhibition, some of these
numerous times. As with Miyao, Yokoyama is an extremely talented
Bizen ceramic artist and one who’s star will surely rise even higher.

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The hidden preview links are below, additional photos of any work gladly sent on request and the exhibition will go online for public viewing this Friday:
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19.

Enjoy!

With deep thanks and appreciation from Mishima.
Sincerely,

Robert Yellin
HOMEPAGE

3-2-18 Omiya-cho, Mishima-shi, Shizuoka-ken
Phone: 81-559-91-5388
Fax: 81-559-91–5387

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow
5 Star Foodie
Think Twice
Frank Fariello

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Robert Yellin’s Newsletter: Japanese Pottery by Miyao Masahiro

scene

Greetings from Mishima,

We hope this finds you well and enjoying the autumn season. Here in Japan it’s the Season of Culture–and great food and drink–with many exhibitions and events planned throughout the islands. Here in Mishima we’re starting our autumn exhibition season with Miyao Masahiro, an emerging-important Bizen ceramic artist who recently fired and unloaded his autumn kiln.

manaita

Robert was the first to see–and select–the newly fired works and we offer here in our preview pages the chance to acquire one or more of the 60 works, ranging from cups to large vessels.

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Miyao Masahiro was born in 1970 in Fukuoka prefecture on the southern island of Kyushu. Even from his boyhood he knew he wanted to ‘play with clay and fire’ and become a Bizen ceramic artist. With that goal in mind he dropped out of university in 1991 and headed to Bizen to apprentice with Okayama Intangible Cultural Property Yamamoto Yuichi (son of Living National Treasure Yamamoto Toshu 1906-1994).

cups-all

Miyao established his own kiln a few kilometers outside of Bizen in 2001. His star has been on the rise ever since with awards won at prestigious events such as the Japan Traditional Arts and Crafts exhibition, which was the JTAC Chairman’s Award and Miyao is only the third Bizen potter ever to win this award. Other awards were garnered at the Contemporary Tea Forms Exhibition at the Tanabe Museum and at the JTAC Chukoku Exhibition where he was awarded the Okayama City Mayor’s Award, and the Okayama Culture Exhibition where he won the Runner-up Grand Prix. All of these in a very short time span.
Easy to see why.

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His forms are fresh and engaging, combined with his superb firings we have a rising star. He does all the classic Bizen styles including the highly prized ‘kiln change’ yohen, dripping sesame goma, scarlet hidasuki rice cord markings and his addition of pine ash on some works to add a new ‘landscape’ to his works; we offer all these styles in this exhibition.

The preview hidden links are below and all details on each piece can be found under the photos in the captions. Additional photos or details on any work will gladly be sent upon request to:
robert@e-yakimono.net
The exhibition will be available for public viewing in a few days, for now those who have signed our guest book—thank you–are offered previews here:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

Our future exhibitions before the year ends include a look Iga’s Fujioka Shuhei, Bizen by Yokoyama Naoki, and a few large Shodai plates by Inoue Taishu that were exhibited at the Kumamoto Prefectural Museum of Art. Also on the horizon Wakimoto and Harada of Bizen with about a dozen works each. Of course, each weekday we continue to offer new works by many various artists working in many styles; we hope you visit us here in Mishima or online

With thanks and appreciation as always and all the best from apan.

Sincerely,

Robert Yellin
HOMEPAGE

3-2-18 Omiya-cho, Mishima-shi, Shizuoka-ken
Phone: 81-559-91-5388
Fax: 81-559-91–5387

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow
5 Star Foodie
Think Twice
Frank Fariello

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Robert Yellin’s Newsletter: Mishima Summer Greetings-Some new Ceramic

FUKAMI
Fukami Bowl

Greetings from Mishima,

Here in Japan just yesterday the news announced that the rainy season has officially ended in Okinawa, and thus the rest of Japan can look for clear skies in the coming days and weeks. Much rain has fallen–as in many parts of the world–and all I can say is bless the rain and clear water, essential for a good life and good ceramic art!

AGANO-TSUBO-FRONT
Agano Tsubo

In the past weeks here at the gallery we have previewed and listed some Mino works by Yamada Kazu, a fine Morino Taimei jar, a Fukami bowl, rare Mashiko jar by Kimura Ichiro, among other works.

KIMURA-FRONT
Mashiko jar by Kimura Ichiro

Tomorrow yakishime-anagama specialist Nagaoka Masami is stopping by to show us some new works. We hope that to refresh the senses and spirit you’ll stop by the online gallery to view these pieces and others as well.

MIHARA-FRONT
Mihara work

Any works ordered before the rainy season ends here in Mishima will have EMS on the house along with some of Shizuoka’s finest green tea added.

yamada-kazu-oribe-and-iga-vases
Yamada Kazu & Oribe Iga Vases

On tap for the autumn look for exhibitions by Bizen potters Miyao
Masahiro and Yokoyama Naoki, then Shigaraki by Kato Takahiro and Iga by Fujioka Shuhei.

In the meantime, on the 14th of June I’ll be going to a major dealer-only gathering—the only foreigner–and hope to find some great single works to offer, stay tuned on from the 15th of June.

Wishing all a pleasant summer, and as always thank you and best from Japan.

Cordially,

Robert Yellin
HOMEPAGE
email at robert@e-yakimono.net

Robert Yellin’s Newsletter: Koinuma Michio–Significant Objects–Exhibition Previews

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Greetings from Mishima,

To all yakimono fans far and wide, it’s been awhile indeed. We hope that this finds you and yours well enjoying the joys of spring.

Here in our gallery we continue to offer one-of-a-kind works each
weekday shown on our online gallery pages. Recently we offered a look at Seto potter Takeuchi Shingo, new works by Takahashi Samon and Sasaki Izuru’s tenmoku sake cups. Now, we’d like to share preview links to one of Japan’s most respected veteran potters, Koinuma Michio.

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Koinuma (b.1936) was selected in a 2001 survey by a leading Japanese ceramic art magazine as one of most popular veteran potters of the 20th century. In that list number one was Kamoda Shoji–more about their connection later on–with Koinuma being in a tie for number 11 with votes that equaled Itaya Hazan, Furutani Michio, Koie Ryoji, Shimizu Uichi, Kato Hajime, Fujiwara Kei, Yamamoto Toshu and Tamura Koichi (the latter five all Living National Treasures). Yabe Yoshiaki of the Tokyo National Museum wrote of visiting a Koinuma exhibition after having just returned from the US, “I was instilled with a powerful impression of a man pursuing the most solemn and expression-oriented work in the whole international world of modern arts and crafts.”

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As you’ll see in the following links to Koinuma’s most recent works–I visited him a few weeks ago and selected just fired pieces–Koinuma’s ceramic art is indeed solemn, there is an ancient feel and aura to his output not only in form, yet in firing as well. The works have a magnetic power that the current Head Curator of the National Museum of Modern Art, Craft Gallery, Tokyo Kaneko Kenji described as ‘possessive.”

All Koinuma’s forms are hand-built with slabs of clay and he hardly ever repeats forms, like that of Kamoda Shoji. Koinuma was inspired by Kamoda back on the 60s and is one reason he moved to Mashiko; at that time Kamoda was making ash-glazed works, Koinuma told me Kamoda’s work took a dramatic change in form after he met Koinuma. The two had planned to do an exhibition together, yet fate took Kamoda away much too early.

Many young potters have sought out Koinuma’s advice over the years on making forms and firing and Koinuma mentioned when now hot Mihara Ken came to visit about twenty years ago to learn about sekki-stoneware firing forms and burnishing techniques; the styles and spirituality of both potters are inspiring indeed.

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We’ve offered Koinuma’s single pieces now and then over the years, this is the first time to show a number of works. The exhibition will go online from May 13th and below are hidden links of the exhibition. All pertinent details are noted in photo captions and any additional photos or details will be gladly send upon request. Koinuma does not provide boxes, yet we can order them here for a small fee and send the lids to him to have signed. He will be visiting the gallery during the exhibition,
which ends on May 29th–and we’d be happy to take a photo of any
work with him if requested. Koinuma is a rare and important Japanese ceramic artist and we hope you find at least one piece to add to your home to inspire and delight the senses and spirit.

Check more on Homepage: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12


The Japan Blog List

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Must-see tasting websites:
-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery
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Robert Yellin Mishima Yakimono Gallery Newsletter: Kansha (Appreciation) from Japan


The Japan Blog List

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fujioka-tok

Greetings from Mishima,

As 2008 comes to a close we here in Mishima would like to say thank you for visiting our gallery this year; kansha is a good word the Japanese use to express their appreciation and we send our kansha to you.
kido
Last week we concluded our recent Shimura Noriyuki exhibition and it was a lot of fun indeed. Not our usual shibui offerings, yet Shimura is a fine ceramic artist who sparks the imagination and senses, and as Einstein once said imagination is more important than knowledge. Shimura’s works were bought by clients worldwide and kansha to all who visited the exhibition online.
kato-dotaku
If anyone is looking for a year-end gift or something for yourself, until our last day at the gallery–which will be Dec.26th–EMS insured express postage for any item will be on the house, and works in our back pages that have been waiting for a good home we are offering a deal on those, so if anything there interests you please email me at robert@e-yakimono.net (web gallery is of course at www.japanesepottery.com).

Also, this year we have a neat Hokusai Fuji-san calendar to send out as well with anything leaving the gallery.

Next year we will have Iga, Shigaraki and Bizen exhibitions, as well as participating at the Art Fair Tokyo from April 3-5!

In any event, again our deep thanks and kansha; wishing you a very pleasant and relaxing year-end and a very positive 2009, with many days just as you like them.

Namaste from Mishima,
Robert

Robert Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Robert Yellin Mishima Yakimono Gallery Newsletter: The Power of Myth–Shimura Noriyuki’s Floating World…..Previews


The Japan Blog List

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large-dragon-front

Greetings from Mishima,

As late autumn winds blow here in Japan, the world around has become a seductive and gorgeous world of color. A blessing to alive to see, enjoy and be part of. In these days of seasonal and mindful change I wanted to share an artist whose work matches the season, the season of color and the season of inward and outward change. His name is Shimura Noriyuki.

First though to quote Joseph Campbell, a man I never met, yet from whom I have been a humble student of in text:

We’re so engaged in doing things to achieve purposes of outer value that we forget the inner value, the rapture that is associated with being alive, is what it is all about.・

and

“The function of mythological symbols is to give you a sense of
“Aha! Yes. I know what it is, it’s myself.”

And these two quotes point to a connection between the power of symbols and art and how they affect who we are and how we live. I believe it’s important to be reminded of this each and every sacred day. Shimura creates his very unique art with these thoughts in mind, giving us everything from small dishes to figures that not only make one smile and ‘find the child within
again’, yet also are visual entities of what Campbell speaks of, the rapture and joy that *is* being alive here and now. Many of Shimura’s pieces are mythical beings and others are just pure fun.

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Shimura (b.1956) is an Izu, Shizuoka ceramic artist, yet this is his first Shizuoka–and worldwide–exhibit. He’s shown all over Japan–after having studied with late, great Seto glaze master Kato Sho. In the early years Shimura entered and was accepted at such prestigious exhibitions as Nitten, Asahi, Chunichi, Suntory Museum, Japan Ceramic Art exhibitions, yet decided to give up these places to show at smaller galleries throughout Japan; since 1996 that is what he’s done.

dragon-box figure-buddha figure-fuji-a

His works are colorful, yet his use of color is very shibui, as you’ll see in the preview pages below. The exhibition will go online tomorrow, Thursday the 20th–and Shimura will be in the
gallery all day for those who might like to Skype and say hi.

wine-bottle

If not for yourself, then Shimura’s works are a great year-end gift. Additional photos of any works gladly sent upon request:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Enjoy; peace, health and happiness for the upcoming holiday seasons around our world.

And as always thank you very much.

Warm regards,

Robert Yellin
Robert Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Robert Yellin Mishima Yakimono Gallery Newsletter: Bizen Yaki/Bizen Pottery


The Japan Blog List

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(Wakimoto Hiroyuki )

Greetings from Mishima,

Just coming back from California last week I once again realized how important the seasons play out in Japanese culture. Talking with my friends in San Diego most had no idea about how the
Japanese take the seasons to a poetic height, for instance changing vessels to match the seasons. Here autumn is in full swing and thus autumnal delicacies and fitting pottery are to be
seen everywhere. I can argue that no other Japanese pottery style fits autumn better than Bizen.

A month or so ago I did visit Bizen and selected works by Harada Shuroku, Wakimoto Hiroyuki and Kakurezaki Ryuichi.

Works by Wakimoto

and Harada are mostly listed in the gallery–some preview photos for Wakimoto–and after my return from California I started listing Kakurezaki’s works. All three are major figures, yet


Kakurezaki is surely *the* Bizen ceramic artist representing the *now* for Bizen. Four of his larger not yet listed works can be viewed here:
1, 2, 3, 4.

Today I’ll be listing a katakuchi pouring vessel as well as a smaller vase. All are museum quality works and please do view them when you have a moment, if for nothing else then to refresh
the senses in these surreal days.

Also, Ajiki Hiro’s son Jun is also now showing some of his fine chawan with us; they are very much in his father’s artistic realm. Quite a few potters here are now copying the Ajiki style, especially their checkered Basara style, blatant copying really.
I won’t name names, yet one is a very celebrated–shameless–potter here.

In May our gallery was featured on a NHK special on Bizen and since then a small book was published by NHK with additional photos and copy. All in Japanese though, if anyone is interested
in seeing a copy please email me.

Also, if you happen to be in Tokyo on Oct. 25th, John Gauntner and I will be hosting a Sake-Pottery Lecture Dinner; please email me for further details or see John’s web site noted above, the events page.

In any event, thank you for your interest in our gallery and wishing you all a pleasant autumn.

Cordially,

Robert Yellin
Robert Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Robert Yellin Mishima Yakimono Gallery Newsletter


The Japan Blog List

Please check the new postings at:
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Greetings from Mishima,

Today is August 1st and hard to believe two months of the summer have already passed. For kids in Japan though it’s basically just beginning as the summer vacation just began last week.

No matter where you are–and how young you are–we hope you are having a delightful and happy summer…in the northern hemisphere!

A few weeks ago I drove four hours to visit Hamada Tomoo and select some new works that he had just unloaded from the kiln. As I noted in my brief description online, Hamada Tomoo(b.1967) is a fine Mashiko potter expanding the tradition of which his grandfather Shoji made famous; his father is Shinsaku. Tomoo studied sculpture at Tama Art University before returning to Mashiko. He’s already established himself in Japan with numerous exhibitions including Mitsukoshi, Tokyo, and he was part of a three generation (Shoji-Shinsaku-Tomoo) exhibition at the Asahi Museum, Kyoto. I like his work–and know he’s an important potter for Mashiko–because its fresh for Mashiko using the same traditional materials his father and grandfather used. Tomoo has a keen sense and already since we last offered works he’s taken his art to a higher level. A few years ago a US museum director and I visited Hamada and now his work is in the museum’s collection. We hope a Hamada Tomoo piece will find its way into
your collection as well.
Here are the links to view the exhibition:
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Please note additional photos or information will gladly be sent upon request.

I’ve also been adding scenery photos in many listings to give visitors a sense of place where we are and also just to enjoy the beauty of Japan. Also, as some know, there are often advance
preview photos of works to be offered soon.

As always thank you very much and all the best from Japan.

Clear skies,

Robert Yellin
Robert Yellin Yakimono Gallery
www.japanesepottery.com
www.e-yakimono.net

Robert Yellin Pottery Gallery Newsletter


The Japan Blog List

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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From now on I will publish Robert Yellin’s (wit his approval) Pottery Gallery Newsletter because he lives in Numazu City and works in Mishima City, and also sells great pottery, which is great prerequisite to gastronomy!

Greetings from Mishima,

Now in Japan is a time called tsuyu–better known as the rainy season. The weather changes quite dramatically each day withdownpours and sunshine that keeps one in humble awe at the
beauty and life giving force that nature provides.

Something that is more of a constant to bank on though is theheat, something that will surely come when the rainy seasonpasses in a few weeks. Then it’s matsuri-festival time!

With that in mind, we are delighted to offer one ceramic artistwhose works will allow you to keep cool in spirit and mind simplyby gazing upon, or better yet using the vessels; many who followour gallery know him: Ono Kotaro.

These are new works by the very-talented Ono. First, a bit aboutOno(b.1953); winner of the 4th Mashiko Ceramics CompetitionHamada Shoji Prize, he creates sleek, sharp porcelain wares. Yet,what is unique about Ono is that his porcelain has two sides toits character: at first glance, his wares look crisp and cool, like fallen snowdrops. Yet at the same time, he has instilled in
his works a delicate, warm glow that is not often found in porcelain wares. This trait can be seen especially in his three trademark glazes of Seihakuji (Bluish White Porcelain), Hakuji
(Ivory White Porcelain) and Ouji (Creamy Yellow Porcelain). Ono uses shinogi–incised lines and ridges–that give his pieces a wave-like rhythm that is uncommon in “static” porcelain. He has a
keen sense of balance and design, and retains porcelain’s elegance while simultaneously being innovative in his “soft yet sharp warmth.” He teaches ceramics at Takikawa Ceramic Center and
his exhibitions and awards include: The Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Art Crafts in Eastern Japan, Mitsukoshi Award in ’80,’83 and Encouragement Prize, ・6; Japanese Traditional Art
Crafts in Japan, Hokkaido Modern Art Museum, Sapporo’84,’85,’86, Hokkaido Asahikawa Museum’90, Fletcher Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand’94, The Exhibition of Modern Ceramics for Tea-Ceremony, Toki, Gold Prize ’95, Toki Oribe Grand Prize in 2000, Asahi Modern Craft Exhibition, ’99, Creative Sake Cup Exhibition, Grand Prize, 2000, and the aforementioned Hamada Prize, among others.
Mention should be made that an Ono Seihakuji mizusashi (fresh water jar) was acquired by the famous Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation (one of the best Japanese Art collections overseas),
and what’s more, this piece was exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum’s Japan Wing.

We are offering previews of the exhibition to all those who have signed our guest book. The links are to follow and will be placed on the gallery for public viewing later this week.
Additional photos of any works will gladly be sent upon request.
Prices are noted in yen and a good web currency exchange web site can be viewed at http://www.xe.com/ucc/

Here are the links:
http://www.trocadero.com/japanesepottery/items/782953/item782953.html
http://www.trocadero.com/japanesepottery/items/782952/item782952.html

http://www.trocadero.com/japanesepottery/items/782951/item782951.html

http://www.trocadero.com/japanesepottery/items/782949/item782949.html

http://www.trocadero.com/japanesepottery/items/782948/item782948.html

http://www.trocadero.com/japanesepottery/items/782947/item782947.html
http://www.trocadero.com/japanesepottery/items/782945/item782945.html
http://www.trocadero.com/japanesepottery/items/782944/item782944.html

http://www.trocadero.com/japanesepottery/items/782943/item782943.html
http://www.trocadero.com/japanesepottery/items/782942/item782942.html

http://www.trocadero.com/japanesepottery/items/782938/item782938.html

We hope you enjoy viewing, and acquiring, Ono’s work; a sure wayto beat the summer heat and add a touch of beauty to the day.

Namaste and kansha from Japan.

Cordially,

Robert Yellin
Robert Yellin Yakimono Gallery