Tag Archives: Chestnuts

Japanese Vegan Dessert: Chetsnuts Wagashi-Kurikinton-和菓子の栗きんとん

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The chestnut picking season is just around the corner in Shizuoka Prefecture and more particularly in Makinohara where it is officially announced as starting on the 14th!
Chestnuts have been since ancient times a great source of food not only for its nuts but also as a basic ingredient for cakes and even bread (far healthier than wheat flour bread incidentally!)!

Here is recipe for a typical wagashi cake called kuri kinton that should please any priorities!

INGREDIENTS:

Chestnuts: 500g
Maple syrup: 100cc~
Water: 50cc~
Natural salt: a pinch

RECIPE:

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Wash the chestnuts well before making a thin indent with a knife steaming them for about 50 minutes.

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Spoon out the chestnuts into a bowl taking care not to scoop any skin with it.

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Pour all the chestnuts inside a food processor and process until all the chestnuts are well broken. Add salt. Adding water and syrup a little at a time process until all ingredients are used.

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Sieve into a pan.
Cook over a little fire for a while to lower the humidity.

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Spread thinly over a clean cloth to take out excess humidity.

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Roll small balls (size of your liking!) and wrap them into cellophane paper. Twist paper hard to create shape.

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Unwrap and top with some syrup and a nicely cut piece of steamed chestnut!

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By adding some soy milk and more maple syrup you can create a beautiful marron paste!

So easy and healthy!
Enjoy!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

BULA KANA in Fiji
Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

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Shizuoka Shochu Tasting: Chestnuts Shochu-Onozukara Mizukara by Fujinishiki Distillery

Fujinishiki Brewery/Distillery in Fujinomiya City is remarkable for the fact they are the such establishment in Shizuoka Prefecture to own the largest number of licenses to produce sake, shochu and liqueurs!
Not only do they have the licenses but they are also very active in promoting the products of our Prefecture!
This time they have just created a shochu with their own sake lees/sake kasu and chestnuts grown in Kakegawa City!

Note the simple and cute chestnut design on the presentation box!

Chestnuts Shochu-Onozukara Mizukara by Fujinishiki Distillery

Made from distilled rice (sake lees) and chestnuts
Alcohol: 25 degrees

Clarity: Very clear
Color: Transparent
Aroma: Mild attack with a late alcohol surge. Fruity. Chestnuts, oranges, faint banana
Body: Light and fluid
Taste: Beautiful attack with plenty of chestnuts backed up by very pleasant alcohol.
Refreshing.
Faint oranges appear later on the palate.
First tasting conducted straight.
Blends well with water for a deep and smooth but light approach.
Very refreshing with ice or water or chilled carbonated water.

Overall: A discovery!
A very refreshing shochu that can be enjoyed all year round.
Best drunk very slowly on its own over ice.
Great as a long drink, too!
Very elegant and distinctly fruity.
Could definitely used in desserts and ice creams!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London
Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Health & Nutrition Facts in Japanese Food 9: Chestnuts

As demonstrated by many food bloggers, cooking and creating great foods and drinks have become incomplete and unsatisfying when not considering the benefits or adverse effects of the same foods and drinks regardless of their taste.
I do not intend to delve into counselling or consulting, but only to offer some knowledge about the good sides of Japanese foods and drinks. I will not extoll on its possible lacks and negative aspects. After all, the Japanese are not the longest-living people in the world for no reason!
I will also offr at least one nutritious or healthy recipe at the end of each posting.

Health & Nutrition Facts in Japanese Food 9: Chestnuts/Kuri/栗

Chestnuts, since immemorial have been considered as a vital source of nutrients by the Japanese who love to steam it to gether witheir rice.
Not so long ago, it was even a staple food in mountainous regions when rice was scarce.

It is of course extensively used in Japanese Wagashi confection, a great news for vegans all over the world!
Rich in carbohydrates, it provides for healthy and useful calories.
Chestnuts can be reduced into flour, a great component in bread for wheat flour allergics!

For each 100g (edible parts) it contains:
-Energy: 164 kcal
-Water: 58.8 g
-Proteins: 2.8 g
-Carbohydrates: 36.9 g
-Potassium: 420 mg
-Calcium: 23 mg
-Magnesium: 40 mg
-Phosphorous: 70 mg
-Manganese: 3.27 mg
-Nyacin: 1.0 mg
-Vitamin B1: 0.21 mg
-Vitamin B2: 0.07 mg
-Vitamin B6: 0.27 mg
-Vitamin C: 33 mg
-Dietary (roughage) fibre: 4.2 g

HEALTH FACTS & TIPS:

-Combined with asparaguses, or with aloe, or with yam/yamaimo/ or with natto, will help prevent aging and re-inforce the digestive system.

-Combined with spinach, or with string beans, or orange, or with mandarines/tangerines, will help with skin rejuvenation, will help prevent cancer and loss of memory.

-Combined with bamboo shoots, or with chickory, or with lettuce, or with string beans, will will help combat insomnia, will help prevent aging and help with mental faculties.

-Combined with sweet potato/satsuma imo, or with taro/satoimo, or with eel, or with cuttlefish/squid, will will help re-inforce feet and hips, increase stamina and help the liver.

RECIPE:

Here is a simple recipe to help recovery, improve memory, and work as an antioxydant:

Chestnuts: 10
Chicken Breast: 1 (meaning one half of the breats meat)
Pimentoes: 2
Carrot: 1/3
Garlic: 1 clove, finely chopped
Chinese soup: 2/3 of a cup/130 cc/ml
Oyster sauce: 1+1/2 tablepoons
Salt and pepper: a little
Cornstarch: as appropriate
Salad oil: as appropriate

Cut the chicken into bite-sized pieces. Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with cornstarch.

Boil the chestnuts and peel them thoroughly.

Cut the pimentoes and carrot to your preferred size.

Pour some oil in a large frypan. Trow in the finely chopped garlic. When the aroma of the garlic comes out add the chicken.

When chicken is cooked on all sides, add Chinese soup. When the soup starts boiling ad the oyster sauce, chestnuts, carrot and pimentoes..

Cook long enough to allow all vegetables to reach the desired softness/crispness.

Enjoy!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat

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