Tag Archives: Japanese Fish

Japanese Fish Species 5: Kampachi/Amberjack

KAMPACHI-1

With the first days of Autumn upon us, Kampachi or Amberjack is appearing on our plates in Japan!

The fish seems to have so many names in any language: Amberjack, Purplish Amberjack, Yellowtail, Greater Yellowtail, and Ruderfish in English, whereas in Japanese it is called Kampachi, Akahana, Kampa, or Shokko among others, not accounting for regional names!.

KAMPACHI-3

It is caught along Central and South Honshu Island, including a lot in Suruga Bay in Shizuoka Prefecture!
It is a very popular fish as it happens to come just in between Hiramasa/Young Japanese Amberjack-Five ray Yellowtail in Summer and Buri/Mature Japanese Amberjack-Five Ray Yellowtail in Winter, making a favorite for the season, but bringing a lot of confusion on foreign tables because of the similar names.
Kampachi (Seriola dumerili (Risso) in Latin) and Buri (Seriola quinqueradiata Temminck and Schlegel in Latin) are very similar but their season is different. Beware of scams! Actually the meat looks different.

KAMPACHI-2BURI-SUSHI

Kampachi vs Buri Sushi

Natural Kampachi is quite rare in Japan these days whereas human-raised are plenty.

Kampachi is savored in many ways: Sashimi & Sushi, Grilled (Yakimono), Simmered (Nizuke), Meuniere and fried.
Choose comparatively small specimens. Beware of the large cheap specimens!
Ask for a variation in Sushi called “Kampachi Aburi”?kampachi lightly grilled on one side: a beauty!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Japanese Fish Species 4: Hirame/Olive Flounder, Bastard Halibut, Tonguefish, Sole

Hirame/平目

“Hirame” could be translated in many ways depending of your country of origin: Flat Fish, Sole, Turbot (although the latter should define “karei”) and what else. There are many varieties, wild or human-rasied. In Japanese, the names are numerous: Hirame, Shitabirame, Ooguchikarei, Oyanirami, etc.

Actually they can be divided into two main groups:

1)The Olive flounder or Bastard halibut (Paralichthys olivaceus; Japanese: ヒラメ/平目) is a species of large-tooth flounder native to the north-western Pacific Ocean.
It is often referred to as the Japanese flatfish or Korea(n) flatfish (광어) when mentioned in the context of those countries.
It is the most common flatfish species raised in aquaculture in Korea. They are raised in Japan and China as well.

Shitabirame/舌平目

2) Tonguefishes (shitabirame/舌平目in Japanese) are a family, Cynoglossidae, of flatfishes. They are distinguished by the presence of a long hook on the snout overhanging the mouth, and the absence of pectoral fins. Their eyes are both on the left side of their body, which also lacks a pelvic fin.

The best season is Autumn to Winter. They are still available until Spring in Shizuoka Prefecture. Wild ones come from Hokkaido and Aomori. Human-fed ones mainly hail from Oita, Ehime, Mie, and Kagoshima Prefectures.

Hirame Sashimi

The domestic wild catch is around 7600 tonnes a year, while human-fed fish amount to around 7100 tonnes a year. A recent increase has been observed in recent years, though. A lot are imported from Korea through Fukuoka and Shimonoseki.
They are found in tropical and subtropical oceans, mainly in shallow waters and estuaries, though a few species found in deep sea floors, and a few in rivers.

Hirame can be enjoyed in many ways:
As sashimi, cut in various thickness, according to the chef’s preference and presented artfully.

It can be enjoyed cut in small dices, as tartare, especially shitabirame/tonguefish with tomato and strawberry!

Of course, hirame is great as sushi nigiri with all kinds of seasoning I prefer it just seasoned with a little lemon juice or yuzu (if available) and salt (preferably “snow salt” from Okinawa!

The Japanese have a fondness for “engawa”, that is the frilled border along the fillets which are usually thrown away in other countries. The texture is different, almost crunchy.

Hirame is great marinated with konbu/seaweed as konbujime/seaweed marinated.

The same konbujime hirame can be served as oshizushi/pressed sushi topped with more seaweed!

An interesting oshizusshi combination is hirame topped with kabu/turnip and seasoned with yuzu juice and zest!

It is also very popular dried as himono/干物, especially shitabirame/tonguefish.

Naturally the Japanese all kinds of hirame cooked in the French way in a simple and succulent manner as above,

or as a beautiful gratin!

Last, but not least, how about grilled hirame with uni/sea urchin sauce?

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Japanese Fish Species 3: Buri/Yellowtail

BURI-1

We are just between two distinct seasons for Buri/鰤 or Yellowtail, as Hiramasa or young Yellowtail is caught in Summer and Buri/Mature Yellowtail is caught in Winter.

How do you recognize them apart?

BURI-AGO

Buri has a “square chin” as they say in Japanese. Look at the back extremity of the mouth,

BURI-HIRAMASA-AGO

whereas it is more rounded for the hiramasa.

In Japan they are caught south of Hokkaido Island.
They come under many names: Wakashi, Inada, Warasa, Wakana, Hamachi and Mejiro.

Buri/Yellowyail is most popular when caught in rising waters in Winter when called Kan Buri/寒鰤 or “Cold Yellowtail.

BURI-SASHIMI
Buri sashimi after light grill/Aburi/炙り

Young Yellowtails are best eaten as sahimi or

BURI-SUSHI-2

Buri Sushi

or as sashimi as they are leaner then.

Older buri, containing a lot of fat, are better eaten cooked

BURI-TERIYAKI
Buri Teriyaki,

BURI-ARA

Buri Ara with the whole head, or

BURI-MOPPONZU

Buri Mopponzu, including innards, especially liver and heart.

In the West of Japan, a New Year Meal cannot be conceived without buri!

Natural Buri catch accounts for 70,000~80,000 tonnes, while human-raised buri accounts for over 130,000 tonnes every year.
Imported buri account for less than 3,000 tonnes.

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Japanese Fish Species 2: Bora/Mullet

There are at least 12 recognized kinds of mullet being caught all over the world.
The flathead mullet in particular is an important food fish for many around the world, and can be both fished and farmed. The roe of this mullet is salted, dried, and compressed to make a specialty food across the world, such as Korean myeongran jeot, Japanese karasumi, Italian botargo, and Egyptian batarekh . In Egypt, the fish itself is salted, dried, and pickled to make feseekh.

Flathead Mullet, Mugil Cephalus in Latin, or Bora/鯔/鰡 in Japanese will reach length of over 80 cm in Japan, although the average length will more around 50 cm.

It is caught south of Hokkaido near river mouths or in bays receiving lots of river waters.
Like any other fish, it will be called other names depending upon the region: Isegoi (Western Japan), Itanebora (Ehime Prefecture), Mabora (Hiroshima Prefecture), Tsukura (Okinawa), Kuchime, Mejiro, Hebuna, Haku, Makuchi, Kurome, or Merome.

It is a versatile fish:

Served raw as sashimi in Japanese Cuisine or,

as carpaccio in Italian style.

It is more unusual as sushi nigiri (front two) and will probably be found as such only locally.

To answer a query from Luke, it is more encountered cooked:
Deep-fried and served with a soy-based sauce is common to many asian countries.

Deep-fried before being served wit a sweet and sour sauce,

or the same again with tofu is popular in Taiwan (and in Japan!).

First steamed and then served with a sauce made with sweet pickled plum and miso is supposed to be of Chinese origin, but can be found again in many Asians countries.

But for all these recipes, the most valuable (and very expensive at that!) is the roe of the female mullets!

It is served as it is extravagantly in Japanese or Italian cuisine sashimi or carpaccio.

The combinations are infinite!

An extravagant salad of Japanese and Italian inspiration!

Grated over an extravagant pasta dish!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Japanese Fish Species 1: Ainame/Fat Greening

Ainame/アイナメ/Hexagrammos otakii or Fat Greening is a truly Japanese seasonal fish, which has become a rarity as it lives only around the Japanese archipelago along rocky shores in water comparatively high in salt (some are also found around the Korean Peninsula).
Luckily enough it has been raised successfully in the Western part of Shizuoka Prefecture for the last few years.
Its rarity is caused by its popularity with anglers and its very fine taste.
A cousin of the rock fish, it is called many other names such as Aburako, Aburame and when young, Kujime.
The best season is in may and June. As it lay eggs in Winter, the taste loses its appeal.

It is a real morsel to be enjoyed in many ways:

As sashimi, even its skin is edible!

It makes for superb sushi nigiri!

Like any great white-fleshed fish, you must sample it in karaage/deep-fried!

The same karaage can be then marinated!

Another great way to enjoy it is to cook it as Japanese nimono, either slowly simmered or steamed and served with a soy sauce, sake and mirin sauce!

Of course it makes for a supreme delicacy “poelee” in French or Italian gastronomy!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Japanese Fish: Japanese~English Lexicon (regularly amended)

I thought that such a lexicon would become handy both for English-speaking newcomers and long term residents!

I wrote the Japanese pronunciation first, the Chinese (Japanese kanji) characters and the English translations.

bear in mind that many fish have many names depending on the Japanese region. These are the common names.
If you have a question I will be glad to investigate!

A separate lexicon is being prepared for all other seafood!

——————————–
Traditional Japanese Fish Classification

Akami/赤身: red-fleshed fish (tuna, bonito, etc)
Amago/アマゴ: fresh water Red spotted masu trout, Satsukimasu salmon
Gyoran/魚卵: Fish roe (salmon roe, etc)
Hikarimono/光り物: “shining fish” (scabbard fis, etc.)
Nagamono/長もの: “long fish” (eels, etc.)
Saamon/サーモン: salmons
Shiromi/白身: white-fleshed fish (sole, etc.)

Fish varieties

Aburagarei/油鰈: a cheap variety of karei/鰈: righteye flounder, atheresthes evermanni Jordan and Starks
Aodai/青鯛: “blue snapper”, paracaesio caeruleus (Katayama)
Atorantikku saamon/アトランティックサーモン: Atlantic salmon
Ainame/鮎並、愛魚女: greenling
Akahata/赤羽太: an expensive variety of red grouper, epinephelus fasciatus
Aka isaki/赤伊佐木、赤伊佐幾、赤鶏魚/Red chicken grunt
Aka jinmiidai/赤仁羽鯛 (also called Sujiara/筋𩺊): Red-spotted rockcod, Blue spotted grouper
Akakamasu/赤梭魚、赤梭子魚、赤魳 (also called Honkamasu/本梭魚、本梭子魚、本魳): red barracuda, sphyraena pinguis Gunther
Aka kasago/赤笠子、赤瘡魚: rockfish, marbled rockfish, scorpionfish
Akamanbou/赤万包 (also called Mandai/万鯛): Opah,Moonfish
Aka mebaru/赤メバル: red Japanese sea perch-rockfish
Akamutsu/赤鱫、赤鯥 (also called Nodokuro/喉黒): rosy seabass, red gnomefish
Akou/茂魚,石茂魚 (also called kijihata/雉羽太): redspotted grouper
Akoudai/赤魚鯛: rose fish
Amadai/甘鯛: tilefish
Amenouo (Biwa masu)/岩魚, 鯇、天之魚(琵琶鱒): Biwa trout, Biwa salmon (fresh water), char
Aanago/穴子、海鰻: conger eel
Ankou/鮟鱇、鮟: frogfish, monkfish
Ara/𩺊: sawedged perch
Ayu/鮎、香魚: ayu, ayu fish (fresh water)
Bachimaguro/鉢鮪 ・撥鮪(also known as Mebachi/目鉢 。眼撥or as Mebachimaguro/目鉢鮪・眼撥鮪): big-eyed tuna
Bakemaguro/化け鮪(also called Koshinagamaguro/腰長鮪): longtail tuna, longtailed tuna, spot-side tuna (the smallest tuna in Japan)
Binchoumaguro/鬢長鮪 (also known as Binnaga/鬢長 and Tonbomaguro/蜻蛉鮪): Albacore
Binnaga/鬢長 (also known as Binchoumaguro/鬢長鮪 and Tonbomaguro/蜻蛉鮪): Albacore
Biwa masu (Amenouo)/ 琵琶鱒(岩魚, 鯇、天之魚): Biwa trout, Biwa salmon (fresh water), char
Bora/鯔: mullet
Bouzu Konnnyaku/坊主蒟蒻 (also called Chikodai/チコ鯛 or Chidai/血鯛, although misleading): Chunky fathead, cubiceps squmixeps
Budai/ブ鯛: white-spotted parrotfish, Japanese parrotfish
Buri/鰤: yellowtail
Chidai/血鯛: Crimson sea-bream,Porgy
Chouzame/蝶鮫、鱘: sturgeon
Dojyou/鰌:loach
Ebisudai/恵比寿鯛: Deepwater squirrelfish, Ebisu perch, Giant squirrelfish
Ebodai (also called Ibodai)/えぼ鯛(疣鯛): Japanese butterfish, Melon seed, Wart Perch 
Fuedai/笛鯛: star snapper
Fugu/鰒、河豚: Globefish
Fuka/鱶: shark
Funa/鮒: crucian carp (fresh water)
Ginzake/銀鮭: coho salmon, silver salmon
Gomasaba/胡麻鯖: blue mackerel
Goten anago/御殿穴子: a cheap variety of Anago/穴子: conger eel, arisoma meeki (Jordan and Snyder)
Hagatsuo/歯鰹: striped bonito
Hakkaku (also called Tokubire)/八角 (トクビレ): a variety of poacher, Podothecus sachi
Hamadai/浜鯛 (also called Onaga/尾長): flame snapper, longtailed red snapper, Onaga
Hamafuefukidai/浜笛吹鯛: a cheap variety of snapper, lethrinus nebulosus (Forsskal)
Hamo/鱧: pike eel
Hata/羽太: grouper, the expensive variety
Hata hata/鰰: a sandfish
Haze/蝦虎魚、鯊: goby
Hedai/平鯛: goldlined seabream-tarwhine-stumpnose
Higetara/髭鱈: snubnose brotula
Himedai/姫鯛: Crimson snapper,Sea-perch,Snapper
Hirame/平目、鮃、比目魚: sole, flatfish
Hiramasa/平政: yellowtail amberjack
Hirasaba/平鯖: chub mackerel, Pacific mackerel, blue mackerel
Hirasoudagatsuo/平宗田鰹: auxis, variety of bonito, bullet tuna
Hirasuzuki/平鱸: a variety of sea blackbass
Hokke/𩸽: Okhotsk atka mackerel, Arabesque greenling
Honkamasu/本梭魚、本梭子魚、本魳 (also called Akakamasu/赤梭魚、赤梭子魚、赤魳): red barracuda, sphyraena pinguis Gunther
Honmaguro/本鮪 (also called Kuromaguro/黒鮪): bluefin tuna
Hoshigarei/星鰈: “Star Turbot”,verasper variegatus (Temmink and Schlegel)
Houbou/方々: red gurnard, red robin
Ibodai (also called Ebodai)/ 疣鯛(えぼ鯛): Japanese butterfish, Melon seed, Wart Perch 
Ikanago/玉筋魚: Japanese sand lance
Indomaguro印度鮪 (also known as Minamimaguro/南鮪): Southern Bluefin tuna
Irako anago/伊良子穴子: a cheap variety of Anago/穴子: conger eel, synaphobranchus kaupii Johnson
Isaki/伊佐木、伊佐幾、鶏魚: chicken grunt
Ishidai/石鯛: striped beakfish, barred knifejaw
Ishigaki-Ishigakidai/石垣-石垣鯛: spotted knifejaw
Ishigarei/石喰霊: stone flounder
Ishimochi/石持: silver croaker, white croaker, silver jewfish
Iso kasago/磯笠子、磯瘡魚: a variety of rockfish
Iwana/岩魚、嘉魚、鮇: char, charr
Kaiwari/貝割: whitefin trevally
Kajikimaguro/梶木鮪・旗魚鮪 (also known as Makajiki/真梶木・真旗魚): spearfish (blue) marlin
Kagokakidai/駕籠担鯛: Stripey, Microcanthus strigatus (Cuvier)
Kamasu/魳、梭魚、梭子魚: barracuda
Kanpachi/間八、環八: greater amberjack, Japanese amberjack
Karasugarei/烏鰈: Greenland halibut, Mock halibut, Bastard halibut, Black halibut, Reinhardtius hippoglossoides (Walbaum)
Karei/鰈: righteye flounder
Kasago/笠子、瘡魚: False kelpfish, Marbled rockfish
Kasugo/春子鯛: young Madai/真鯛: Japanese seabream
Katsuo/鰹: bonito
Kawahagi/皮剥: filefish, leather jacket
Kibinago/黍女子、黍魚子、吉備女子、吉備奈仔: silver-stripe round herring,
Kibire/黄鰭: yellowback seabream
Kihadamaguro/黄肌鮪 (also known as Kiwada/キワダ(Tokyo, Wakayama), Gesunaga/ゲスナガ(Shizuoka), Mashipi/マシビ(Osaka, Kochi) and Kinhire/キンヒレ: yellowfin tuna
kijihata/雉羽太(also called Akou/茂魚,石茂魚): redspotted grouper
Kinki/金色魚: Thornhead, Idiot, Sebastolobus macrochir (Gunther)
Kinmedai/金目鯛: splendid alfonsino
Kintokidai/金時鯛: red bigeye
Kisu /鱚、鼠頭魚: sand boarer
Ko Aji/子鯵: very young horse mackerel (also called Mame aji/豆鯵)
Kochi/鯒、牛尾魚: flathead
Kohada (konoshiro)/小肌(鰶・鮗・鯯・鱅): dotted gizzard shad
Koi/鯉: carp (fresh water)
Konoshiro (kohada)/小肌(鰶・鮗・鯯・鱅): dotted gizzard shad
Korodai/胡蘆鯛: a cheap variety of snapper, diagramma pictum
Kose/コセ: A variety of Stripped jack, also called Shima aji/縞鯵!
Koshinagamaguro/腰長鮪 (also called Bakemaguro/化け鮪): longtail tuna, longtailed tuna, spot-side tuna (the smallest tuna in Japan)
Koshyo (Koshiodai)/胡椒鯛: crescent sweetlips
Kuchimidai/口美鯛 (also called Menada/目奈陀・目魚): haarder, redlip mullet, Liza haematocheila (Temminck and Schlegel)!
Other names I will have to add to the lexicon!
Kue/九絵、垢穢: longtooth grouper
Kurodai/黒鯛: Japanese black porgy
Kuromaguro/黒鮪(also called Honmaguro/本鮪): bluefin tuna
Kuro Mebaru/黒眼張、黒眼張魚、黒鮴/Black Japanese sea perch
Kuromutsu/黒鱫、黒鯥: Black gnomefish
Kuro shitabirame/黒舌平目: Black Sole
Kyuusen/九線・九仙 (also called Bera/ベラ): halichoeres poecilopterus (Temminck and Schlegel) a cheap variety of snapper in Eastern Japan, but an expensive one in Western Japan
Maaji/真鯵: Japanese jack mackerel
Ma anago/真穴子 (also called Maru anago/丸穴子): a cheap variety of Anago/穴子: conger eel, conger myriaster (Brevoort)
Madai/真鯛: Japanese seabream
Madara/真鱈: Pacific cod
Magarei/真鰈: flounder, yellow striped flounder, turbot, halibut
Maiwashi/真鰯: sardine
Makajiki/真梶木・真旗魚 (also known as Kajikimaguro/梶木鮪・旗魚鮪): spear fish (blue) marlin
Makubuu/マクブー (also called Shirokurabera/シロクラベラ): Okinawa Blackspot tuskfish, Choerodon shoenleinii (Valenciennes)
Mame aji/豆鯵: very young horse mackerel (also called Ko Aji/子鯵)
Managatsuo/真魚鰹: butterfish
Mandai/万鯛 (also called Akamanbou/赤万包): Opah,Moonfish
Maruaji/丸鯵: “round horse mackerel”, decpterus akaadsi Abe
Maru anago/丸穴子 (also called Ma anago/真穴子): a cheap variety of Anago/穴子: conger eel, conger myriaster (Brevoort)
Marusoudagatsuo/丸宗田鰹: auxis, variety of bonito, frigate tuna
Masu/鱒: trout
Masunosake/鱒の介: king salmon, chinok salmon
Matoudai/的鯛、馬頭鯛: John dory, St Peter’s fish
Matsukawagarei/松川鰈: An expensive variety of Japanese Karei/鰈: righteye flounder, verasper moseri Jordan and Gilbert
Mebachi/目鉢・眼撥 (also known as Mebachimaguro/目鉢鮪・眼撥鮪or as Bachimaguro/鉢鮪・撥鮪): big-eyed tuna
Mebachimaguro/目鉢鮪 ・眼撥鮪(also known as Mebachi/目鉢 。眼撥or as Bachimaguro/鉢鮪・撥鮪): big-eyed tuna
Mebaru/眼張、眼張魚、鮴: Japanese sea perch, Japanese rock fish
Medai/目鯛: an expensive variety of Japanese snapper, hyperoglyphe japonica
Meichidai/目一鯛: an expensive variety of Japanese snapper, Gymnocranius griseus
Meitagarei/目板鰈: Frog-flounder, Finespotted flounder, Seriola quinqueradiata Temminck and Schlegel
Mejina/眼仁奈: largescale blackfish
Mejiro/目白: young Buri/鰤: yellowtail
Mekajiki/眼梶木・眼旗魚: swordfish, broadbill
Menada/目奈陀・目魚 (also called Kuchimidai/口美鯛): haarder, redlip mullet, Liza haematocheila (Temminck and Schlegel)!
Menuke/目抜: a Japanese variety of rock fish/sea perch, “flame fish”, sebastes flammeus (Jordan and Starks)
Minaimaguro/ 南鮪 (also known as Indomaguro印度鮪): Southern Bluefin tuna
Mizukamasu/水魳、水梭魚、水梭子魚: a variety of Japanese barracuda
Mutsu/鱫、鯥: gnomefish
Namazu/鯰: catfish (fresh water)
Nanyoubudai/: blunt headed parrotfish, parrotfish, Chlorurus microrhinos (Bleeker)
Nishin/鯡・鰊: herring
Nodokuro/喉黒 (also called Akamutsu/赤鱫、赤鯥): Rosy seabass
Noresore/のれそれ: conger eel whiting
Oaka Aji/尾赤鯵:Red tail horse mackerel
Ohyou/大鮃: halibut
Okimebara/沖目張 (also called Usumebaru/薄目張): sebastes Thompson (Jordan and Hubbs): a variety of Japanese sea perch, Japanese rock fish
Okoze/虎魚、鰧: velvet fish
Onaga/尾長(also called Hamadai/浜鯛): flame snapper, longtailed red snapper, Onaga
Onigochi/鬼鯒、鬼牛尾魚/a variety of sand borer
Onikasago/鬼笠子、鬼瘡魚: Devil scorpion fish
Renkodai/連子鯛: Yellowback seabream
Saamon torauto/サーモントラウト: salmon trout
Sagoshi/サゴシ/Another name for Sawara/鰆/Japanese Spanish mackerel
Sake, Shake/鮭: salmon
Samegarei/鮫鰈: roughscale sole, clidoderma asperrimum (Temminck and schlegel)
Satsuki masu/皐月鱒: Red spotted masu trout, Satsukimasu salmon
Sakura masu/桜鱒: seema, cherry salmon, masu salmon
Same/鮫: shark
Sanma/秋刀魚、青串魚: mackerel pike
Sappa/鯥: Japanese shad
Sawara/鰆: Japanese Spanish mackerel
Sayori/細魚、針魚: halfbeak
Sennendai:千年鯛: Emperor red sanpper
Shiira/鱪、鱰: mahi mahi, dolphinfish
Shimaaji/縞鯵・島鯵: striped jack, white trevally
Shimanagatsuo/縞鰹: Striped butter fish (not to be confused with Suma/縞鰹: a variety of bonito found in South Japan/same kanji characters!)
Shinko/シンコ: young Kohada (konoshiro)/小肌(鰶・鮗・鯯・鱅): dotted gizzard shad
Shirauo/白魚: white bait
Shirasu/白子(Namasirasu/生白子 if raw): sardine whiting
Shirokurabera/シロクラベラ (also called Makubuu/マクブー): Okinawa Blackspot tuskfish, Choerodon shoenleinii (Valenciennes)
Shiro mebaru/白眼張、白眼張魚、白鮴: white Japanese sea perch-rockfish
Shirosaba Fugu/白鯖河豚: a variety of globefish/puffer fish, lagocephalus wheeleri abe, tabeta and kitahama
Shishamo/柳葉魚: Shishamo (meaning willow leaf fish, a kind of Japanese smelt), Spirinchus lanceolatus
Soi or Kurosoi/曽以, 黒曽以: a variety of black rockfish, sebastes schlegeli, 1880
Sujiara/筋𩺊 (also called Aka jinmiidai/赤仁羽鯛): red-spotted rockcod, blue spotted grouper, plectropomus leoparadus(Lacepède,1802)
Suma/縞鰹: a variety of bonito found in South Japan. Not to be confused with Shimanagatsuo/縞鰹(same kanji characters!): striped butter fish
Suzuki/鱸: Japanese seabass, Japanese dace
Tachiuo/太刀魚、魛: scabbard fish, cutlass fish
Tai/鯛: Seabream (in Japan, it means the best variety!), red snapper
Taiseiyoumaguro/大西洋鮪: Atlantic (including Mediterranean) bluefin tuna
Takabe/鰖: Yellowstriped Butterfish
Tara/鱈: cod
Tobiuo/飛魚: flying fish
Tonbomaguro/蜻蛉鮪(also known as Binchoumaguro/鬢長鮪 and Binnaga/鬢長): Albacore

Torafugu/虎河豚・虎鰒: globefish
Tsubodai/つぼ鯛: pentaceros japonicus Doderlein (seabream variety)
Ugui/鯎、石斑魚: a Japanese dace, fresh water minnow
Umazura/馬面 (also called Umazurahagi/馬面剥): black scraper, Filefish, Scraper, a large variety of filefish
Umazurahagi/馬面剥(also called Umazura/馬面): black scraper, Filefish, Scraper, a large variety of filefish
Unagi/鰻: eel (only cooked)
Urumeiwashi/うるめ鰯: round Herring
Usumebaru/薄目張 (also called Okimebara/沖目張): sebastes Thompson (Jordan and Hubbs): a variety of Japanese sea perch, Japanese rock fish
Utsubo/鱓: moray eel
Wakasagi/公魚、鰙、若鷺: pond melt, Japanese melt (fresh water)
Yagara/矢柄: trumpet fish
———————————————–

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
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, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
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-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
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Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Sakura Shrimps Fisherman in Yui: Hiroki Kubota-窪田弘毅!

A samurai of old? Hiroki Kubota-窪田弘毅!

The cherry shrimps spring catching season will be finished in three weeks before being resumed in late fall.
So yesterday, 23rd of May, it was high time I went looking for an old friend working half of the year as a cherry shrimps fisherman in Yui, Shimizu ku, Shizuoka City!

The cherry shrimps entry gate!

Although Yui has lately been incorporated into Shizuoka City it is still a bit far from the center of Shizuoka City, 5 stations away along the Tokaido Railway Line.
Once you get off Yui Station turn immediately to the right where you will see the Cherry Shrimps Gate at the entrance of Cherry Shrimps Street!

Have a look at the map conveniently set up near the station entrance!

Looking at the pictures you will discover there is lot to see in this little fishing village!

Now, be a bit nosy and you will find copies of old pictures on vending machines!

A fisherman’s life was really hard toil not so long ago, but they already knew how to enjoy themselves!

If you do not miss the entrance to the small (but nationally-known!) harbour past under the railway track you will notice this signboard!

It features a map of Suruga Bay between Omaezaki and the Izu Peninsula.
Every two days the departure time is clearly indicated, varying between 5:30 and 6:30 p.m.!
The ships will be back between 10:30 and 12:00 p.m. depending upon the catch.

The ships, all owned by the Yui Cherry Shrimps fishermen Association are divided into four groups with a new destination every two days as well as a different departing order!

You will find two kinds of fishing ships inside Yui harbor:
The smaller cherry shrimps boats.

And the larger differently-equipped shirasu/sardine whiting boats.
The season and departing times are different for those and they do belong to another Association.

A grand view of the highly protected harbour from its land’s end!

The shirasu boats and private vessels are moored at the end of the harbor.

The Yui Harbor Fishermen Association building where the morning auctions are conducted! I will report there as early as 6:30 a.m. for my next interview!

The exit to the sea under the Tomei Expressway!

A view of the harbour from the sea’s end!

Both quays are dotted with accesses to fuel from where the ships can pump in their individual needs directly!

Ice is brought in bags in small trucks.

I finally found my man: Hiroki Kubota-窪田弘毅!
Hiroki is now a very young 43-year old samurai figure.
After graduating from Tokai University in Yokohama 23 years ago he decided to come back home and work as a cherry shrimp fisherman in Yui half of the year and spend the rest of the year abroad, Bali these days, to enjoy his passion: surfing!
He actually lost half of his right thumb this year in a surfing accident and still wears a plaster around his right hand and wrist!

It doesn’t matter how long you have been in the business, but you still have to go through a lot of very important chores such as oiling the machinery!

Checking the nets!

A last check to ensure the good unfurling of the nets!

Hiroki’s ship: Dai Ichi Wakamiya Maru!
Dai Ichi stands for “First” as the ships always work in teams of two with six crew on each ship!
“Maru” means “Ship”!

This little box is the privies!
They didn’t have it a long time ago!
The ships have been equipped with siphons only ten years ago to haul the shrimps from the nets held between ships!
The work had to be done with large baskets, ropes and pulleys before.
Hiroki assured me that the fishing has definitely become easier on the body!

Each ship is equipped with a stove constantly burning as the nights are cold at sea!
Hiroki’s crew mates, all great lads, invited to join me in the near future! I’m definitely tempted although the Dragon at home will probably disagree!

Checking one’s wet suit and personal belongings for a last time.

Waiting for the official start always announced over a loudspeaker.
Fishing is done only in the evenings of Spring and Fall when the shrimps rise from their usual depth under 200 metres to up to 50 metres below surface.
In Spring fishing is concentrated in the eastern half of the bay whereas in the fall it will be done in the Central part of the Suruga bay.

Still some time left to share a joke and a rumor!

Some mooring lines are already loosened and taken away.

Some of the crews are already putting on their fishing wet suits. Hiroki does seem to need his yet…

What may such men laugh about at such a time?

Our samurai does seem to be an old hand!

Getting the ice ready in the proper place!

Putting some of the protective buoys back aboard.

All ships are equipped with powerful radio and radar!

A last call to the girlfriend?

The last ships leaving!
Hiroki’s was one of the last that day as his ship would work in the nearby sea!

Hiroki’s ship leaving at last!

Speeding away!

Good luck guys, and have a good catch!

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Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
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Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery