Tag Archives: Croquettes

Wild Boar Croquettes at Kiyozawa no Sato Road Station in Shizuoka City!

Yesterday I was cycling along the Warashina River at already quite some altitude in search of Aihama Shirahige Shrine when I reached a place called Kiyozawa No Sato Road Station.
Sato means village, hometown, etc. and Kiyozawa is the name of the area.
Road Stations is a Japanese concept meaning local shops basically serving and selling products!

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Cute sign!

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The Station/eki/駅!

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local (top class!) Honyama green tea!

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Local vegetables!

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I asked local ladies/farmers busy preparing vegetables (on a Sunday!) if I was on the right way.
They kindly answered me that I was on the right way (they forgot to mention it was from near!).

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I was about to take my when I noticed that flag sign!

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Wild boar croquettes!
I was tired and hungry!
I didn’t hesitate! I pulled the bicycle on the side and entered the place!

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It might be a small diner but they are quite famous as they are recognized by the Shizuoka Prefecture Government!

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All kinds of customers from local kids to tourists and real cyclists kept coming in!

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Local potter!

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Local Japanese cakes filled with sweetmeats!

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The wild boar croquettes! Still hot and only a couple of packages left!
You can eat them on site and the lady in charge even prepared my green tea!

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the local wild boar are a real nuisance and some of them end up in these croquettes! Purely local!

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Really appetizing!

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Crunchy outside and soft inside!

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Not only yummy but very healthy with local vegetables!

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There was another remarkable product on sale!

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Wild boar curry!
Incredible souvenir to take back home!

KIYOZAWA NO SATO NO EKI
Tel: 054-295-3783
opening hours: 09:00~16:00
Closed on Mondays (on next day if Monday is a National Holiday)
HOMEPAGE(Japanese)

MAP

INOSHISHI-CROQUETTES-MAP

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

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Halloween Kabocha Croquettes

Halloween might all be about pumpkins but when it comes to cooking kabocha is far better!
Croquettes are popular all over the world, so why not make some for Halloween!
The witches will make a special brew to drink with them!

INGREDIENTS (for 6 croquettes)

Kabocha: 500g
Milk: 2 tablespoons
Butter: 20g
Honey: 2 teaspoons
Cinnamon powder: a little
Salt: a little
Cheese or Camembert cheese: 20 g
Raisins: 10g

Flour: as appropriate
Egg: 1
Breadcrumbs: as appropriate
Sliced almonds: as appropriate
If you have them dried somen (thin Japanese wheat noodles)

RECIPE:

Cut kabocha into rough pieces.
Put inside oven dish.
Cook inside microwave oven for 8 mintes at 700 Watts.
Peel skin off.
Bear in mind kabocha will be very hot when you manipulate it!

In a bowl mash the kabocha.
Add milk, butter, honey, salt and cinnamon.
Mix well.

Separate the paste into 3 identical quantities.
Make two balls with the first quantity around cheese/camembert cheese.
Make two balls with the second quantity mixed with the raisins.
Make two plain balls with the third quantity.

Shape each croquette like a small pear.
Roll them in flour, then beaten egg and then breadcrumbs (or sliced almonds, or dried somen).

Heat oil to 180 degrees Celsius and deep-fy.

Serve 3 different croquettes on a dish and decorate with Italian parsley.

How about the above for a more elegant presentation with croquettes filled qith camemebrt Cheese!

So easy!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Sweet Potato Croquettes: Japanese Recipe

Croquettes (called “korokke/コロッケ in Jaoanese), especially made with potatoes (versions made with thick white sauce are also very popular) must be one of the most celebrated comfort foods all over the world.
I don’t exactly know when they first appeared in Japan but people here certainly consume them with a vengeance! I stopped counting books and magazines entirely dedicated to the delicacy in this country!

Now, sweet potatoes (satsuma imo/薩摩芋 in Japanese) offer a very interesting variation and should be appreciated by all members of a family with the added sweetness!

Sweet potato croquettes/Satsuma Imo No Korokke/薩摩芋のコロッケ!

INGREDIENTS: (for 2 people or 8 small croquettes)

Sweet potato: 1 (200 g)
Chicken breast: 80 g (after having taken skin and fat away)
Onion: 50 g (finely chopped)
Salad oil: 1 tablespoon (for frying)
White sesame seeds: as appropriate
Egg: 1 large
All-purpose flour: 2 tablespoons
Black pepper: a little
Salt: a pinch
Soy sauce: 1 teaspoon
Sesame oil: 1 teaspoon

RECIPE:

Cut away both tips of the sweet potato.
Wrap it in a wet kitchen paper towel.
Cook in a microwave oven at 600 W for 4 moinutes and 20 seconds to soften it.
You may do this inside a steamer, too.

Peel the potato and mash it in a bowl.
You may want to leave out a few solid bits for a better bite that you will mix with the whole later.
Keep the mashed potato aside in its bowl.

Chop the chicken breast finely.
If you haven’t done it yet, chop the onion finely.
You may chop them together.

Heat a frypan. Heat the oil. Fry the onion and chicken together.
Once the heat has penetrated the meat and onion add some salt and pepper (not included in ingredients above) to your preference. Add soy sauce and fry until the chicken and onion are properly cooked. Do not overcook!
Let cool down for a while.

In the bowl containing the mashed potato add the cooked chicken and onion, the flour, the salt, the black pepper, the egg and the sesame oil. (You may add spices of your liking then!)
Mix the whole well.

Divide the mixture into 8 equal quantities.
Spread oil on the palm of your hands and make 8 patties of similar size and shape.
Flatten them a bit for equal cooking.

Coat one face only with sesame seeds.

Pour some oil on a frypan.
Fry croquettes sesame-coated face down first.

Cook for a little while. Cover with lid. When the bottom face is cooked to a nice brown color (lifting up the lid from time to time is no problem!) turn over and continue frying.

To check if yor croquettes are properly cookd, press their middle with a finger. The finger shouldn’t sink easily.

Place croquettes on kitchen paper to absorb excess oil.
Serve them as soon as possible as they are.
No need for sauce or extra seasoning!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Croquettes: Japanese-Style Recipe

Since I’m planning to run a series of recipes on potatoes and sweet potatoes, I thought it would be a good idea to first re-introduce the Japanese basic way of preparing Croquettes or “Korokke” as they say in thos country!

Here is the basic recipe prevalent in restaurants and homesteads.
Naturally it can be expanded and modified at will.
I will not bother you with measurements this time as the method is the point of this posting!

INGREDIENTS:

-Potatoes (you will have to decide which variety! In Japan, “Danshaku” are best!)
-Onion
-Minced meat (of your choice!)
-Salt and pepper
-Flour (of your choice)
-egg
-Milk
-Breadcrumbs (fresh if possible)
-Oil
-Lard (skip if you don’t like, but a pity!)

RECIPE:

-Boil the potatoes with their skins.
Peel the skins off just out of the water when very hot. This way, the potatoes will not be too wet.

-Mash the potatoes roughly with a wooden spoon/spatula. Add salt and peepper and mix roughly. Cover with cellophane paper to keep the potatoes warm as long as possible.

Chop the onions finely and fry in lard if possible for better taste. If you don’t like lard, use oil. You could add chopped garlic and small pieces of bacon.
Add minced meat of your choice. Season with a little salt, pepper, sugar and soy sauce according to you preferences. Fry until the minced meat is cooked.

-Add the mashed potatoes. Mixing them all atogether at the same time fry until potatoes have become dry enough.
Let cool completely and transfer to a storage dish. Cover with cellophane paper and leave overnight in the refrigerator to allow taste to permeate the potatoes. This is an important point as not only it will enhance the taste but make the croquettes easier to shape.

-Spread a little oil over your palms and shape croquettes to you preffered size.

-Roll in flour and “shake” croquettes so that not too much flour adheres to them.

-Prepare (you might better do that first, LOL) the croquettes egg dip by mixing beaten egg, flour and milk to your preference.
Dip the croquettes in the batter completely.

-Roll the croquettes in the breadcrumbs.
One way to make breadcrumbs is to use real bread which had turned completely solid, soften it in milk, let it dry again and crush it into powder!

-Deep-fry croquettes at 170 degrees Celsius until they have reached a colour of your liking.
As everything is already cooked inside, don’t worry if they are not enough cooked.
Point: add a little sesame oil to your frying oil for extra taste.

There are all kinds of sauce and decoration you cane serve croquettes with, unless you like them plain with a little mustard for example.

Here is a little suggestion for good taste and appetizing presentation:
Prepare a light white sauce/bechamel in the aurora style sauce with plenty of white pepper and boiled green peas.

Don’t they look nice like that!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Japanese Gastronomy: Korokke-Croquettes/Introduction & Basic Recipe!

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Korokke (Japanese: コロッケ) is the Japanese name for a deep fried dish originally related to a French dish, the croquette. It is also said that it comes from the Dutch, Kroket.
It was introduced in the early 1900s. This dish is also popular in South Korea where it is typically sold in bakeries.

Korokke is made by mixing cooked chopped meat or seafood, vegetables with mashed potato or white sauce, or both, rolling it in wheat flour, eggs, and breadcrumbs/panko, then deep frying this until brown (fox colour in Japanese!) on the outside.
Korokke are usually shaped like flat patties. They are generally called “ingredient + Korokke”. For example, those using beef would be called “beef (gyu) korokke”, those using shrimp, “ebi korokke“, etc.. Those using white sauce may also be called “Cream Korokke”.

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Korokke are often served with Worcestershire sauce and shredded cabbage.

Korokke can be eaten as is, and are sometimes sold wrapped in paper at stalls. They may also be used as a topping for other dishes. When sandwiched between a piece of bread, they are be called “Korokke pan” (“pan” being bread in Japanese).

Korrokke was the most sold single frozen food in 2007 and has been among the top three ever since.

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BASIC RECIPE

Here is the basic recipe prevalent in restaurants and homesteads.
Naturally, it can be expanded and modified at will.
I will not bother you with measurements as the method is the point of this posting!

1) INGREDIENTS:

-Potatoes (you will have to decide which variety! In Japan, “Danshaku” are best!)
-Onion
-Minced meat (of your choice!)
-Salt and pepper
-Flour (of your choice)
-Egg
-Milk
-Breadcrumbs (fresh if possible)
-Oil
-Lard (skip that if you don’t like it, but it would be a pity!)

2) RECIPE:

-Boil the potatoes with their skins.
Peel the skins off just out of the water when very hot. This way, the potatoes will not be too wet.

-Mash the potatoes roughly with a wooden spoon/spatula. Add salt and pepper and mix roughly. Cover with cellophane paper to keep the potatoes warm as long as possible.

-Chop the onions finely and fry in lard if possible for better taste. If you don’t like lard, use oil. You could add chopped garlic and small pieces of bacon.
Add minced meat of your choice. Season with a little salt, pepper, sugar and soy sauce according to you preferences. Fry until the minced meat is cooked.

-Add the mashed potatoes. Mixing them all atogether at the same time fry until potatoes have become dry enough.
Let cool completely and transfer to a storage dish. Cover with cellophane paper and leave overnight in the refrigerator to allow taste to permeate the potatoes. This is an important point as not only it will enhance the taste but also make the croquettes easier to shape.

-Spread a little oil over your palms and shape croquettes into you prefered size.

-Roll in flour and “shake” croquettes so that not too much flour adheres to them.

-Prepare (you might better do that first, LOL) the croquettes egg dip by mixing beaten egg, flour and milk to your preference.
Dip the croquettes in the batter completely.

-Roll the croquettes in the breadcrumbs.
One way to make breadcrumbs is to use real bread which had turned completely solid, soften it in milk, let it dry again and crush it into powder!

-Deep-fry croquettes at 170 degrees Celsius until they have reached a color of your liking.
As everything is already cooked inside, don’t worry whether they are cooked enough or not.
Point: add a little sesame oil to your frying oil for extra taste.

There are all kinds of sauce and decoration you cane serve croquettes with, unless you like them plain with a little mustard for example.

Here is a little suggestion for good taste and appetizing presentation:
Prepare a light white sauce/bechamel in the aurora style sauce with plenty of white pepper and boiled green peas.

Don’t they look nice like that!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Healthy Gastronomy: Croquettes Lunch Set at Cielo Azul Café

Service: Friendly but very shy
Facilities: Great general cleanliness
Prices: Reasonable
Strong points: Healthy lunches, dinners and desserts

This is the second installment of Healthy Lunches in Shizuoka City and Prefecture!
It is a necessity for me as I’ve been fighting the Battle of The Bulge for some time!

Located in fashionable Takajyou Machi in Shizuoka City, Cielo Azul Café looks as if it had escaped from a Pacific Island!

The menu is clearly indicated (in Japanese) at the bottom of the stairs.

Blue stairs with a blue facade…

You will have a hard time keeping away from the sweets dessert!

The furniture is great fun to study: primary school desks from France!

Very feminine in concept!

There are four different lunches on the menu all for a reasonable 950 yen!
I chose the home-made Croquettes Set Lunch!

Healthy rice topped with black sesame seeds.

Local vegetables salad.

Local vegetables soup.

The Croquettes!
Yummy looking, aren’t they?

Corn cream croquettes! Not as easy to make as they look!

Potato & minced meat Croquettes!

A drink was also included in the set but I decided to add one of their cakes!

Beautiful baked peach tart!

You can expect other visits soon as they still three more lunch sets to explore! LOL

Cielo Azul Cafe
Shizuoka Shi, Aoi Ku, Takajyou, 1-7-8, 2F
Tel. & Fax: 054-255-9509
Business hours: 09:00~22:00 (until 20:00 on Sundays and Mondays)
Closed on Wednesdays
Private parties welcome!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

With a Glass,
Clumsyfingers by Xethia
Adventures in Bento Making, American Bento, Beanbento, Bento No1, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box, My Bento Box, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat; Bento Lunch Blog (German); Adventures In Bento; Anna The Red’s Bento Factory; Cooking Cute; Timeless Gourmet; Bento Bug; Ideal Meal; Bentosaurus; Mr. Foodie (London/UK); Ohayo Bento

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery