Tag Archives: Sushi Restaurant

Sushi and Sashimi Lunch at Maguro Ichigo In Shimizu Fish Market, Shizuoka City!

Service: shy but very kind
Equipment and facilities: Overall very clean. Shared bathroom, old but clean.
Prices: Reasonable
Strong points: first class fish and seafood at very reasonable prices. Super fresh. Serves both raw and cooked fish!

The locals know it well but tourists do not seem to know yet the value of visiting a local fish market to enjoy super fresh fish and seafood at very reasonable prices all in an authentic atmosphere away form mannerisms and snobbery downtown.
In Shizuoka City the Shimizu Fish Market is the place! Very easy to find: get off at Shimizu JR Railway Station turn right in the direction of the harbor and use the overhang passage. Turn left to cross the road and go gown at the end. The fish market is two minutes away on foot on your right!

This particular fish market is known all over Japan for its tuna as this the largest tuna unloading harbor in Japan!
I do have to visit the place regularly for business or otherwise and my favorite restaurant is Maguro Ichigo/まぐろ一期!
Take your time to check the dish and cuisine models exhibited outside! They also have a menu in English on request!
It is a great place to visit alone or with family as they also serve scrumptious cooked food for people and especially children who don’t like raw food! Incidentally they offer a set for children, too!

I chose a set consisting of a tuna/maguro sushi bowl topped with all kinds of tuna and a sakuraebi kakiage/cherry shrimps fritter/ a local specialty with miso soup and pickles!

The maguro sushi bowl was topped with slices of akami/lean tuna, chutoro/semi fat tuna and negitoro/scraped tuna with pickled ginger! As for the price, unbeatable!

The cherry shrimps fritter!

My friend had a different set including a small sashimi plate!

A rarity in Japan: Simmered tuna tail!

It is only a small sample of the food and dishes available!
Come as a group and taste as many dishes as possible!

MAGURO ICHIGO/まぐろ一期
424-0823 Shizuoka City, Shimizu Ku, Shimazaki Cho, 149, Shimizu Fish Market, 1F
Opening hours: 9:30~17:30
Closed on Wednesdays
Cash only

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

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Sushi Restaurant: Uogashi Sushi Minato Ten (Harbor Shop) in Numazu City!

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Service: A bit shy and busy but very friendly!
Equipment & Facilities: Overall very clean. Excellent washroom
Prices: Reasonable
Strong points: Very fresh fish and seafood directly from Numazu harbor for the main part. Also features other Japanese cuisine. Good drinks list

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Some of the fish is still alive an d kicking!

I had the other day the occasion to visit one of Uogashi Sushi restaurants, a chain which originated in Numazu City and now has establishments as far as Yokohama.
They serve a good array of fish and seafood at comparatively (for sushi restaurants) reasonable prices. They can be classified as median regarding the standards of quality in Japan but they have the merit to serve some of the freshest produce in the country!
Here is what we had the other day:

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Kawahagi o-tsukuri/whole filefish/leather jacket sashimi plate!

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They have their own label sake!

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A Honjozo Nama called “Otoko no Mondashi/漢の問出” by Hana no Mai Brewery in Hamamatsu City!

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The first plate of sushi!

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The second plate of sushi!

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Vegetable tempura!

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Ikura/salmon roe!

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Negitoro/grated tuna roll and scallops/hotate/nigiri!

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Grilled sanma/saury pike nigiri to finish!

They have a lot, lot more, a very practical place for families and big parties!

Numazu UOGASHI SUSHI Minato Ten/沼津魚がし鮨港店

420-0844 Numazu City, Kasuga Cho (inside the harbor), 47-1
Tel.: 055-963-4090
Opening hours: 11:00~21:00
Credit cards OK

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

Sushi Restaurant: New Concept at Sushi Ko-Miue in Shizuoka City!

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Service: Very kind and easy-going[
Facilities: Impeachable cleanliness. Superb washroom
Prices: Reasonable to slightly expensive
Strong points: Unusual and happy combination of Sushi and French gastronomies. Shizuoka sake and even shochu!
Entirely non-smoking (extremely rare for a sushi restaurant!)!

Only a few weeks ago Chef Yukitoshi Oda/小田幸寿さん, formerly of Sushi Ko Sushi Restaurant opened this new sushi restaurant in an entirely new concept for Shizuoka: A traditional sushi restaurant combined with a French restaurant!
The establishment is divided into two distinct adjoining parts: a 8-seat sushi bar-counter where customers who are interested in sushi should sit and a room with holes built in the floor to sit easily under low tables where one should sit if he/she wishes to enjoy a combination of both cuisines or only French gastronomy. The kitchens, althoug tiny, are clearly separated and they don’t interfere with each other.
The food, naturally is top-class with a strong accent on local fish and vegetables in particular and of superb freshness. As for drinks, sake, beer, wine and even local shochu are available!

And the icing on the cake, it is totally non-smoking!

To cut a long story short let me show you what we had for dinner the other day, a combination set of both cuisines!

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The o-tooshi/snack coming with the first drink: naga-imo/long taro root and hotaru ika/tiny フィレflysくいd。
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Basashi/馬刺し/horsemeat sashimi coming into two varieties: lean and fat!

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The fatty variety.
Served with olive oil and grated garlic!

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Sashimi plate: kinmedai/Splendid Alfonsino, hotaruika/firefly squid and madai/true seabream!

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Minami magurao/South Pacific tuna, tachiuo/Scabbard fish, sayori/Japanese halfbeak, sakura ebi/cherry shrimp and hotate/scallops!

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Nanban-style deep-fried chicken!

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Japan and France meeting: maguro oshiri/tuna tail with cabbage, tomatoes and renkon/lotus roots!

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the tuna is also minami maguro and sauteed.

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Shizuoka City is famous for its succulent lotus roots!

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The sushi plate!

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Kuruma ebi/large prawn and minami maguro.

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Minami maguro and uni/sea urchin! The latter, a creamy beauty!

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Hime soba/buckwheat sprouts!

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Buri/Japanese Amberjack!

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The desserts are also a fusion concept: banana omelette/pancke and vanilla ice cream!

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Dekopon oranges with their jelly and sorbet!

You can bet this is only the first (actually second, but it is a secret!) visit!

Sushi o Miue/寿し幸実宇栄
420-0852 Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, kooya Machi, 13-6
Tel.: 054-221-3888
Opening hours: 17:30~indeterminate
Closed day not yet decided
Credit cards OK
Entirely non-smoking!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

BULA KANA in Fiji
Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

Sushi Dilemma: Real Sushi vs. Conveyor-belt Sushi (Kaiten Zushi)

Ikura Gunkan Sushi at Sushi Ko, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Prefecture.

True to say conveyor-belt sushi restaurants (kaiten Zushi) seem to be very popular these days in Japan wherever you are, be it in a large metropolis, a harbor city or a place up in the country.
Judging from the attendance and the plorifiration of such establishments, even in cities like Shizuoka renown for its sushi and sashimi in general, one starts to wonder about the wisdom of apparently spending more money on a good sushi place when you have cheap sushi available almost everywhere.

Ikura Gunkan sushi at Kaiten Karato Ichiba Sushi, Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi Prefecture (man-made ikura!).

I’m not really refering to Tokyo or major metropolises in Japan (neither to New York, London or Paris for that matter) where you either have to spend fortunes on cleverly manipulated “gastronomic sushi” or spend hours waiting overfilled diners machine-gunning leftovers from the local fish markets.

To illustrate this article I chose two places I have visited in two major fishing areas of Japan:
!) Sushi Ko in Shizuoka City where all prices are clearly stated or where the staff will gladly explain the amount of the “day’s value” for some items, especially sashimi. Shizuoka Prefecture is a major fishing area in Japan thanks to the Suruga Bay and Izu Peninsula. Apart of ikura/salmon’s roe there is no much need to “import” seafood from other shores.
2) Kaiten Karato Ichiba Sushi, Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi Prefecture.
Shimonoseki is a major fsihing city and Kaiten Karato Ichiba Sushi is a conveyor-belt sushi restaurant inside the enormous fish market by the sea. You do have to wait at least 30 minutes at off-peak times and the double on holidays.
The same applies for the fish supply and ikura!

Hirame/sole-grouper nigiri at Kaiten Karato Ichiba Sushi.

Now, except maybe if you are a big family and on a limited budget (even so it would be far cheaper and more interesting to organize a “do-it-yorself” sushi party at home!), would you be ready as an individual or couple to wait untold amounts of time to be finally ushered inside a crowded place sitting elbow against elbow, putting up with the cries of unruly children (or noisy old ladies and gentlemen) and looking at the best bits being repeatedly being grabbed before they rach you?
Can you expect attentive service from an overworked staff worrying if the next batch of rice will be ready on time?

Hirame/sole-grouper nigiri Sushi Ko

On the other hand, in a real and decent sushi restaurant with prices clearly advertized you will have the chance to eat at your leisure and if you sit at the counter (where the prices are the same, contrary to the general belief) also benefit from great discusions with the chefs and even your neighbors (good sushi restaurants are great places for socializing with strangers!). Mind you, the same cannot be said from “upper-class” sushi restaurants in great cities where you more than often are obliged to order sushi on a set-menu basis only, and expected to vacate the premises once finished as soon as possible! That is, if you are not a celebritty or an extraordinarily rich individual!
So obviously, there is a big difference in atmosphere and service, but would it be enough to help you decide between the two?

Maguro o-toro (cheapest tuna variety, though) nigiri at at Kaiten Karato Ichiba Sushi.

Shall we talk about quality then?
First the “shari” or sushi rice: in a conveyor-belt sushi restaurant the nigiri will be made machanically at high speed for obvious economical reasons. It does take a few seconds at a time to form the balls by hands whereas the “chefs” (I’m sorry to say that a chef who cannot make a good sushi ball by hand does not deserve the title of sushi chef!) at conveyor-belt establishments have to learn how to quickly grab the balls spitted out by the machine!
Sometimes you may be lucky to eat more or less oval balls, but you will usually end up with hard-pressed squarish contraptions which tend to dry faster. i do not need to point that there is a vast gap in rice quality (and accordingly real value)!
You can and are even encouraged to ask for individual orders at kaiten zushi restaurants but the prices will not be the same, so be careful!

Maguro zuke 8made with bluefin tuna akami)

Now, let’s talk about the “neta”/topping:
First don’t expect freshly grated wasabi root in a kaiten zushi (except maybe in Shizuoka which produces 80% of all wasabi in Japan!), although the paste used contains 100% pure wasabi!
Whereas most of the fish will be cut in front of you, chefs at Kaiten zushi will pick up the toppings from stacks prepared beforehand. The latter more than often (especially maguro) will be cut from frozen blocks to attain greater thinness (and better profit). Consequently the fish will appear glossy and fresh but is in fact only in the late stages of thawing.
Generally speaking the offerings at conveyor-belt sushi restaurants will be far thinner than those ordered in real sushi restaurants nothwithstanding the difference in grade and freshness, although the latter can be guaranteed in Shimonoseki!

Sashimi Plate at sushi Ko: Shirasu (sardine whiting), Katsuo (bonito), maguro (tuna) and kinmedai (Spledid Alfonsino), all from Shizuoka Prefecture!

Now thare are a few things you will usually not obtain in a kaiten zushi:
1) a plate of sashimi.

Super California Roll at Sushi Ko!

2) a good quality sushi roll.

Tamagoyaki/Japanese omelet at Sushi Ko

3) a fresh tamagoyaki made onsite.
Tamagayaki in conveyor-belt sushi is either prepared and sent in bulk by the company factory in case of a chain, or made on order by a separate company in the case of an independent establishment.

Although this is in no way an attempt to coersce people into my view, I prefer to spend a little more money on an occasional visit at a decent sushi restaurant or to prepare my own sushi at home! Preparing sushi rice is no big deal (although the Japanese Missus will not let me to…) and finding decent fish (and vgetables) at a local decent supermarket will guarantee a better quality!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

With a Glass,
POPCORNHOMESTEAD in Tokyo by Joan Lambert Bailey,
Clumsyfingers by Xethia
Adventures in Bento Making, American Bento, Beanbento, Bento No1, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box, My Bento Box, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat; Bento Lunch Blog (German); Adventures In Bento; Anna The Red’s Bento Factory; Cooking Cute; Timeless Gourmet; Bento Bug; Ideal Meal; Bentosaurus; Mr. Foodie (London/UK); Ohayo Bento

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery