Tag Archives: Eggplant

Vegan Japanese Dessert: “Daigaku Imo” Sweet Potato

Sweet potatoes or Satsuma Imo/薩摩芋 were introduced a long time ago in Japan where they became a mainstay vegetable in winter, especially in the west of Japan where they supplemented rice as a staple food.
Daigaku Imo/大学芋, literally ‘University Potatoes” have been popular with students for times immemorial as not only as a dessert but also as a great snack. In fact, a lot of people prefer them to fried potatoes!

INGREDIENTS: (for 4 people)

Sweet potato (raw): 600 g
Sugar: 90 g
Ground white sesame seeds: 1 teaspoon
Oil: As appropriate

RECIPE:

Peel sweet potatoes.
Cut in long thin slices (thin wedges). Actually cut them into the shape and size of your preference but take in account that the thicker they are, the longer time they will take to fry.
Leave in water for 10 minutes.
Take out of water.
Wipe off all humidity.

Heat oil to 150 degrees. Keep oil shallow enough.
Fry until the sweet potatoes have softened. Do not let them change color then.

Take sweet potatoes out and shake oil off.
Bring the oil to 180 degrees.
Fry the sweet potatoes again until they attain a nice brown color.

While the sweet potatoes are frying pour the water and sugar in a separate pan and heat on a low fire.
Let sugar dissolve completely.
When the rim of the water changes color keep heating gently shaking the pan around. You may use a spatula but proceed gently.
When the syrup has attained a light brown color switch off fire.

Take sweet potatoes out of the oil once cooked. Shake off oil well. Drop the potatoes into a separate bowl.
Add the ground white sesame seeds.
Mix well, taking care not to damage the potatoes.

Coat the potatoes with syrup while hot and let cool down completely inside a recipient slightly coated with oil.

Serve and enjoy!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

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Vegan Japanese recipe: Fried and Marinated Eggplants with Paprika

Vegan cuisine can be a very easy concept making the best out of simple and tasty ingredients!
here is another simple way to accomodate eggplants the Japanese way!

INGREDIENTS: (for 2~3 people)

Eggplants: 3^4
White wine vinegar (or Japanese rice vinegar): 1 tablespoon
Paprika powder: as much as you want!
Salt: 1/2 teaspoon

RECIPE:

Clean the eggplants. Wipe them and cut them into one bite pieces.

In a pan pour olive oil. Heat the pan over a low fire.
Throw in all the eggplants.
Fry until heat has penetrated the eggplants well. Add teh vinegar.
Cover with a lid and cook over medium fire until the greater part of water/sauce has disappeared.

Transfer into a recipient Let cool down. Keep inside therefrigerator.
Serve chilled sprinkled with plenty of paprika powder!
Naturally you can add color and taste served topped with fresh herbs!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Vegan Japanese Recipe: Japanese-style Cold Eggplants & Tomato Antipasti

Japanese and Italian influences can be found in this simple antipasti recip!

Japanese-style Cold Eggplants & Tomato Antipasti

INGREDIENTS: (for 3 people)

Eggplants: 3 (400 g)
Tomato: 1 large
Small leek: 1 finely chopped
Ooba or large shiso/perilla : 4 leaves finly cut

For the dressing:
Ground white sesame seeds: 1 very large tablespoon/30 g
Sesame oil: 1 and a half tablespoons
Soy sauce: 3 tablespoons
Sugar: 1 tablespoon
Japanese sake (if not available dry white wine):
Finely chopped fresh ginger: 1 teaspoon
Grated fresh garlic: a ;ittle or as appropriate
Red chili pepper: 1/2, finely chopped

RECIPE:

Cut eggplants in half. Then cut off part of the skin 8to make them easier to eat. Cut each half lengthwise in atrips 5~8 mm thick.

Wet the the eggplants in water. Put them inside a cooking cellphane/vinyl pouch. Fold the pouch so as to have the opening ath bottom. You could also wrap them in cellophane paper.
Cook in microwave oven at 600 W for 1 minute and 30 seconds.
You could also cook them inside a steamer.

Let cool down completely and then chill them inside refrigerator.
If you want to chill them quickly bind the pouch closed and dip it in a bowl full of water and ice.

Put all the sauce ingredients into a bowl. Cover it with cellophane paper and cook in microwave oven for 50 seconds. Let it cool completely and then chill it.

Serving for one person.

Arrange the eggplants on serving dish. Put the tomato thinly sliced and formed into a rose on top.
decorate the eggplants and tomato with chopped leek and thinly sliced shiso.
Pour sauce over the whole as shown in top picyure.

Serve and enjoy with a great beer, cold sake or chilled white wine!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Vegan Japanese Recipe: Japanese-style Sweet & Sour Eggplants

Eggplants or Aubergines or Nasu/茄子 in Japanese are a very popular vegetable in Japan whose people have many recipes of their own that would satisfy many vegans and vegetarians worldwide.
These recipes are simple and the ingredients should be easy to obtain!
Sweet & sour sauces basically originate from China but Japan has its own versions, albeit lighter in texture and taste!

Japanese-style Sweet & Sour Eggplants

INGREDIENTS: (for 2 people)

Eggplants: 2~3
Freshly grated ginger: 1 tablespoon
Green shiso/perilla: 5 leaves
Soy sauce: 2 tablespoons
Sugar: 1 and a half tablespoons
Salad oil: 1 large tablespoon and a little
Golden sesame seeds: as appropriate

RECIPE:

Take off stem part and cut eggplants lengthwise in four. Clean under running cold water. Wipe off all water with kitchen paper.

In a skillet pour the oil and fry the eggplants until they have attained a nice color.

In a large bowl drop the soy sauce, grated ginger and sugar. Mix well. Add the shiso leaves finely cut in thin strips. mix quickly.

Add the fried eggplants in the bowl. Stir them gently as to cover them completely. Let soak them in for at least 5 minutes. The fact that the eggplants are hot will melt the sugar and help them absorb the sauce.

Place the eggplants in a dish. Pour all the sauce on top and sprinkle sesame seeds on top.
The Japanese eat such a dish in summer at room temperature.
Great snack with beer!

Here is a variation with the same ingredients with mini tomatoes and shishito hot chilies added for more color and presentation. And taste, of course!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Oil Varieties: An Introduction

OLIVE-OIL-PRODUCTION
(The Manufacture of Oil drawn and engraved by J Amman in the Sixteenth Century/Wikipedia)

Once again, the other day during my bus ride to work (it’s pouring on weekends these days!), I was thinking of my vegan and vegetarian friends and also my omnivore (I’m one of them!) ones. As far as I can recollect, there is little written about oils and I thought I could write up a useful posting for all to copy and borrow!

Have you ever wondered how many kinds of oil there are out there?

All right, shall we start (and I’m sure to forget some along the way!):

OLIVE OIL
OIL-OLIVES

Now, we all seem to know what olive oile is all about.
But there is only one good type of olive oil: Extra Vrigin Olive Oil! That is what comes out first caused by the natural pressure of all these olives piled upon each other.
The rest is sub-standard, whatever the name.
Back in France (and most probably in may other countries) we have olive oil sommeliers/tasters!
have you ever heard of the expressions: fruitiness, bitterness, pungency, and mouth feel.
And I’m not talking about the olives themselves!
I will not tell and hope I got you hooked!

SWEET ALMOND OIL
OIL-ALMOND

Almond Oil was used as perfume in ancient times.
Light and very fragrant, it is particularly welcome in marinades (raw salmon seasoned with dill or basil) or drizzled over seafood, pasta or fish prior to serving.

ARGAN OIL
OIL-ARGAN

Also called Moroccan Fennel Oil, Argan oil is an oil produced from the kernels of the endemic argan tree, that is valued for its nutritive, cosmetic and numerous medicinal properties. That tree is found only in North Africa.
Bold and wild in taste, it is a favourite of mine. Use it isparingly n salads, couscous and tagines. Works wonders on a beef carpaccio and on goat cheese.

PEANUT and ROASTED PEANUT OIL
OIL-PEANUTS

Peanuts oil is very common, all right, but roasted peanut has a startling flavour. Perfect for salad and cheese dishes. Suited to all warm climate cuisines: Mexican, African, Indonesian.

CANOLA or RAPE SEED OIL
OIL-RAPESEED

The Japanese eat the unopened flowers and young shoots after boiling them.
They reveal a full-bodied in taste with a distinct cabbage flavor. Enhances potato or beet salads. Try it on fresh cottage cheese!

HAZLENUT OIL
OIL-HAZELNUT

Another favourite of mine. I use it extensively in salad dressings.
Hazelnuts are rich in protein and unsaturated fat. Moreover, they contain significant amounts of thiamine and vitamin B6, as well as smaller amounts of other B vitamins.
Suave and lightly aromatic. Great in all types of salads. Replaces butter (vegans, listen!) on all starches, vegetables, fish, pasta, pastries. Adds a festive touch when drizzled on a potato, green bean or carrot dish.

WALNUT OIL
OIL-WALNUT

Another favourite of mine!
In France we make bread, pickles and liqueurs with them!
Walnuts are also an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, and have been shown as helpful in lowering cholesterol.
They have a pronounced nutty flavour. Well suited for bitter greens (endives, chicory, dandelion); excellent drizzled on starches. This oil is a good companion to a lightly seasoned fresh cheese. This oil fears heat!

PECAN NUTOIL
OIL-PECAN

Pecans are a good source of protein and unsaturated fats. A diet rich in nuts can lower the risk of gallstones in women. The antioxidants and plant sterols found in pecans reduce high cholesterol by reducing the “bad” LDL cholesterol levels.
It reveals a pronounced nut taste, in between walnut and almond. Good on any type of rice, cold, hot or in a salad.

GRAPE SEED OIL
OIL-GRAPESEED

Grape seed oil is also a preferred cosmetic ingredient for damaged and stressed tissues!
Neutral taste (it is unscented). Perfect for mixing with other more pungent oils; ideal for deep frying. Grape seed contains potent antioxidants such as vitamin E alpha and procyandanians, which contribute to its numerous health benefits.

PINE NUT OIL
PINE-NUT

Pine nut oil has a relatively low smoke point, and is therefore not generally used during cooking. Rather, it is added to foods for “finishing”, to add flavor.
It reveals a very subtle and mild taste. Enhances the flavour of any dish on which it is drizzled. Added in the final moments of cooking, it does wonders with seafood stews, sauces (especially wine) and soups (particularly minestrone).

PISTACHIO OIL
OIL-PISTACHIO

In July 2003, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first qualified health claim specific to nuts lowering the risk of heart disease.
Its oil has a very distinct, long-lasting taste. It is not suited to all types of vinegars: balsamic and honey are the best. A vinaigrette composed of this oil, balsamic vinegar, chives and seasoning is superb on an endive and smoked trout (or salmon) salad.

SESAME OIL
OIL-SESAME

In Japan, the best tempura is deep-fried in pure sesame oil only!
Used extensivley all over the World, it has a very strong roasted, nutty flavour. A few drops in a salad or stir fry gives the dish a definite oriental touch.
I use it extensively with tofu, natto and salads!

SOY BEAN OIL
OIL-SOYBEAN

Soy bean oil is mainly used as a bulk cooking oil especially in South Asia and in the Middle East.
The most important point regarding the use of soybeans for human nutrition is the absolute necessity to cook the soybean with “wet” heat in order to destroy the trypsin inhibitors; serine protease inhibitors.
Soybeans are considered by many agencies, including the US Food and Drug Administration, to be a source of complete protein.

MUST-SEE WEBSITE:
1001 HUILES (Engish & French)

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India
Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London
Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Japanese Gastronomy: Vegan Japanese Simmered Egg Plant

Egg plants or aubergines, originating from India, are very popular in Japan and chefs have come up with many simple and succulent recipes in this country!

Here is a very simple one to satisfy the priorities of a vegan or vegetarian.
It makes for a great snack with your drink!

Japanese Simmered Egg plant/Nasi no Ni Komi/茄子乃煮込み

INGREDIENTS For 3 egg plants

Egg plants: 3 shortish and round
Soy sauce: 2 tablespoons
Sugar: 3 tablespoons
Dry short chili (鷹の爪): 1
Sesame oil: as appropriate

RECIPE

1)
Take/cut off the sepals and puncture the egg plant with a tooth pick in dozen places.

2)
In a wok or saucepan drop the egg plants and add soy sauce, sugar and chili. Switch the fire on to hot.
Rool the eggplant in the juices regularly.

3)
Once the liquid has reduced to half, turn the fire down to medium.

4)
Once the liquid has been absorbed by the eggplant add the sesame oil and roll the eggplants in them.
Switch off fire and serve!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India
Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London
Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery