Tag Archives: Tomato

From my Recipe Book: Chicken Meatballs Spaghettini with Marutaka Farm Puree

Cooking, especially at home, shouldn’t be difficult.
The point is to find and use good ingredients!

Marutaka Farm/まるたか農園 in Miyakoda, Hamamatsu City makes a truly extravagant tomato puree made with tomatoes originally grown solely to be eaten fresh. Not wishing to throw away good produce during the peak harvest season they started making this sauce with the pulp of the tomatoes with the sole addition of salt!

You can adapt it to any Italian recipes but must keep in mind it is not as concentrated as European tomato purees but more like sauces.
Each jar contains 270 g, enough to devise a recipe for two.

Chicken Meatballs Spaghettini with Marutaka Farm Puree

Meat balls:
Minced chicken
Grated garlic
Grated Ginger
Japanese sake or white wine (just enough for taste)
Salt
Pepper
Mayonnaise (to liaise instead of eggs)

Above proportions are up to your taste, so experiment!
Mix the whole and make small balls.

Fry some thinly sliced onions in olive oil first in a large and fairly deep fry-pan over medium high fire until they have become transparent.
Add meat balls and fry until they have change color to a light brown. Lower fire to medium low.

Start preparing the spaghettini.

Add a whole jar of Marutaka Tomato Puree and cook for a while. Add 1 large tablespoon of Port wine, 1 large tablespoon of basil sauce, pepper and a little curry mix powder. Add chili pepper powder if you like your pasta hot.

Add plenty of grape tomatoes and cook on a medium fire for a while or until spaghettini are ready.
Drain the pasta and transfer it into the sauce pan. Mix well. Add edamame and sliced black olives and mix again.

Serve hot!

MARUTAKA FARM/まるたか農園
Shizuoka Prefecture, Hamamatsu City, Miyakoda Chyo, 1677-1
静岡県浜松市都田町677-1
Tel.: 053-428-2693

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
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, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Vegan Japanese Recipe: Japanese-style Cold Eggplants & Tomato Antipasti

Japanese and Italian influences can be found in this simple antipasti recip!

Japanese-style Cold Eggplants & Tomato Antipasti

INGREDIENTS: (for 3 people)

Eggplants: 3 (400 g)
Tomato: 1 large
Small leek: 1 finely chopped
Ooba or large shiso/perilla : 4 leaves finly cut

For the dressing:
Ground white sesame seeds: 1 very large tablespoon/30 g
Sesame oil: 1 and a half tablespoons
Soy sauce: 3 tablespoons
Sugar: 1 tablespoon
Japanese sake (if not available dry white wine):
Finely chopped fresh ginger: 1 teaspoon
Grated fresh garlic: a ;ittle or as appropriate
Red chili pepper: 1/2, finely chopped

RECIPE:

Cut eggplants in half. Then cut off part of the skin 8to make them easier to eat. Cut each half lengthwise in atrips 5~8 mm thick.

Wet the the eggplants in water. Put them inside a cooking cellphane/vinyl pouch. Fold the pouch so as to have the opening ath bottom. You could also wrap them in cellophane paper.
Cook in microwave oven at 600 W for 1 minute and 30 seconds.
You could also cook them inside a steamer.

Let cool down completely and then chill them inside refrigerator.
If you want to chill them quickly bind the pouch closed and dip it in a bowl full of water and ice.

Put all the sauce ingredients into a bowl. Cover it with cellophane paper and cook in microwave oven for 50 seconds. Let it cool completely and then chill it.

Serving for one person.

Arrange the eggplants on serving dish. Put the tomato thinly sliced and formed into a rose on top.
decorate the eggplants and tomato with chopped leek and thinly sliced shiso.
Pour sauce over the whole as shown in top picyure.

Serve and enjoy with a great beer, cold sake or chilled white wine!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Tomato Tempura at Uzu!

Service: Excellent and very friendly. Very Japanese atmosphere.
Facilities: Excellent washroom facilities. Great cleanliness overall
Prices: reasonable.
Strong Points: Great sake from Shizuoka and Japan Great Shochu. Home-made umeshu. Mainly local products, especially organic vegetables.
Non-smoking on Sundays and National Holidays

Tempura must be one of the most known facets of Japanese cuisine!
It looks simple enough but good tempura does need a lot of experience and great skills!
And when it comes to serve water-filled vegetables as tempura it becomes a true challenge!

As mentioned before, instead of venturing into long-winded reports about full meals I take at my “regular spots”, I will concentrate on their seasonal dishes!
Now, Mr. Kenya Yoshimura/吉村健也さん is a master of vegetables.
I just can’t imagine the timing and the temperature but when the tomatoes came on my table last night I was once again nonplussed by the sheer simplicity of the dish in its presentation!

This is actually a regular dish at Uzu although the tomatoes will change with the seasons!
In winter I remember having had the same with green tomatoes! The heat had enhanced their hidden “umami” to the point one forgets they were actually unripe!
But the present red tomatoes (organic by the way!) were ripe. I just don’t know how they didn’t explode in the hot oil!
They come with home-made yuzukoshio seasoning. The perfect “marriage” of flavors!

That was how I “presented” it to myself!
All these flavors breaking inside the palate…

To be continued…

UZU
Shizuoka City, Otowa-cho, 3-18
Tel.: 054-249-6262
Business hours: 17:00=23:00
Closed on Mondays and first Tuesday
Reservations recommended
Credit cards OK
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

With a Glass,
Clumsyfingers by Xethia
Adventures in Bento Making, American Bento, Beanbento, Bento No1, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box, My Bento Box, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat; Bento Lunch Blog (German); Adventures In Bento; Anna The Red’s Bento Factory; Cooking Cute; Timeless Gourmet; Bento Bug; Ideal Meal; Bentosaurus; Mr. Foodie (London/UK); Ohayo Bento

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Shizuoka Agricultural Products: Stick Ginger at Hatada Garden

Toshikatsu Hatada/畑田敏克, the 7th generation of the Hatada Family!

With Chiba and Inbaraki Prefectures, stick ginger (or leaf ginger/ha shyouga/葉生姜 in Japanese) is a specialty of Shizuoka Prefecture, and the best are said to be cultivated in Kunou/久能, Suruga Ku, Shizuoka City near the sea where the sandy soil is most propitious!

Yesterday morning I found the whole family and their employees hard at work cleaning, sorting, cutting and packaging the leaf ginger harvested that morning.
Father, Mother, son and 4 staff, including a full time are not too many to harvest the vegetable grown on 1,500 tsubo/4,000 square meters in greenhouses.

Toshikatsu’s fater hard at work!
Toshikatsu’s grandfather first grew leaf ginger 34 years ago!

Ready for packaging. Beautiful, aren’t they?

For a closer look!

The root extremity will be snapped off (not cut!).

The snapped off extremities will not be thrown away. They are just too good! Their filaments and other unwanted parts can easily be pared off before the pieces of fresh ginger can be served in many ways, cooked or raw.
Toshikatsu recommend them fried rolled into tasty bacon!

Toshikatsu makes his own jam with the snapped off extremities of the fresh ginger and honey only. A true health food!

Or pickle them in amazu/sweet vinegar! I was offered that lot! a beauty!

The leaf ginger are carefully selected before delivery.

They usually harvest enough to prepare 100 boxes daily, but they have been asked to limit their delivery to forty daily boxes by their Association due to the recent earthquakes in north east Japan.

Half the boxes will be delivered immediately to Tokyo and the other half to various parts of Shizuoka Prefecture.

The inside of the leaf house greenhouses are hot!
I was advised to take off as many clothes as possible before entering.
40 degrees Celsius! No wonder!
The temperature is controlled by automatic ventilators, but Toshikatsu has to visit the greenhouses every morning and lift the second vinyl sheets where, if one is not careful, the temperature might go into the 70’s!

As for fertilizers, Toshikatsu uses only organic fertilizer, liquid or solid.
Pesticides will be spread at the the bare minimum only once a year.

The care for the health and quality of the vegetables will mean an unavoidable number of them rotting away that have to be taken out at once.

Toshikatsu does not market the rhyzomes (roots) that are found in markets all over the world, but use them for planting.

Choosing the right rhyzomes requires a lot of experience, good eyes, nose and ears (the snap sound is the best indictaion of their health!)!
The ryzhomes will be divided and planted from January to April to produce crops from March to July.
I can assure that the planting alone is back-breaking work!

Toshikatsu and his family grow “leafy” leeks between July and December inside the same greenhouses.
They also grow all year round tomatoes on 300 tsubo/1,000 square meters inside green huses, maily Momotaro and Chuudama varieties.
I certainly intend to come back soon to have a close look at those tomatoes!

Now, I took two batches of those freh leaf ginger with me to introduce them to restaurants of my own choosing. Two gastronomic articles are coming very soon!

Toshikatsu Hatada/畑田敏克
Hatada Garden/畑田農園
422-8015 Shizuoka Shi, Suruga Ku, Naka Hiramatsu, 212/静岡市駿河区中平松212
Tel/Fax: 054-238-3484
Mobile Phone: 09014137499
Corporate and individual orders accepted!

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Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Chrisoscope, Agrigraph, The Agriculture Portal to shizuoka!

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Tomato & Eggplants Stew

Aubergines or eggplants/eggplants and tomatoes are the vegetables of the summer!
They come in cheap, are aplenty and very healthy.
The French have “invented” ratatouille to accomodate them together.
This recipe is a cross between the French and Italian concept.
Vegans should forget the bacon and adopt this simple recipe!

Tomato & Eggplants Stew!

INGREDIENTS: For 4 people

-Eggplants: 4
-Tomatoes: 2
-Bacon: 60g
-Garlic: 1 clove
-Parsley/finely chopped: 1 tablespoon
-Flour: as appropriate
-Olive oil (EV): as appropriate
-Salt & pepper
-Frying oil

RECIPE:

-Peel the eggplants partly along their length in 4~5 spots for design. Cut lengthwise in 4 and cut across to obtain 2 cm thick pieces.

-Cut the tomatoes in 2 cm side cubes.

-Cut bacon in 8 mm wide strips/pieces.

-Cut the garlic clove in two halves and take out core (indegistble!). Cruch the garlic.

-Coat the cut eggplants with flour. Shake off excess flour before deep-frying them at high temperature (170~180 degrees Celsius). Once fried, lay on kitchen paper to take off excess oil, then transfer into bowl. Sprinkle them with a little salt.

-Pour some olive oil in a frypan. Heat it and fry bacon in it. When the bacon becomes crispy, add the tomato cubes and garlic. Fry until most water/liquid is gone. Season with salt and pepper.

-Throw in the eggplants and check taste and add salt and pepper if necessary. Add chopped parsley and a little more olive oil before serving.

Very easy and adaptable, isn’t it?

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Chrisoscope

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Vegan Italian Cuisine: Appetizer at Il Paladino

Service: Excellent and very friendly
Facilities: great and very large washroom, great cleanliness overall
Prices: reasonable to expensive.
Specialty:Sicilian Cuisine. Top-class Italian wines and great collection of Grappa.
no-smoking-logo1 Non-smoking at tables.

With the scalding heat frying us all day long, what can we possibly eat without overcrowding our system?
When I visited Il Paladino, probably the best Italian restaurant in the Prefecture (BG is going to kill me again for that kind of comment!), the chef genially replied: “Just eat vegetables, more vegetables, and even more vegetables!”

Shizuoka Prefecture is blessed with an almost limitless array of vegetable varieties. Actually one has to keep his eyes, nose, and even ears well open, as many more new ones come by the day! I am certainly not one to complain as such knowledge comes inhandy at work when interviewing local farmers!

Present (notice I said “present”) Italian gastronomy wouldn’t exist without tomatoes. Well, I know some good Italian friends who would love to discover the local cultivars.
Shizuoka is receiving a lot of attention for its tomatoes, especially the “Ameera/Very Sweet” genus, which comes in various sizes, from minuscule to large plum-sized.
Il Paladino’s chef chose the latter to prepare his appetizer. They are not only very sweet and fleshy, they also are red all the way through with very little water and pips. You thoroughly enjoy cutting them with a knife, a rarity in Japan!

The tomatoes are peeled first before being marinated with garlic, cucumber (that is served together), lemon, vinegar, olive oil, laurel leaves, sugar, salt, pepper and some “secrets”.

The tomato is then served chilled with the cucumber. Red pimento (not marinated) and basil leaves are added for taste and looks. Finally marinade will be sieved above the whole before being served with toasted home-made bread. I cannot guarantee that the latter was vegan, though, but you certainly need the bread to sponge off the marinade (make sure your bread is vegan, then!)

Tratorria Il Paladino
420-9839 Shizuoka City, Aoi-Ku, Takajo, 2-8-19
Tel.: 054-253-6537
Opening hours: 11:30~13:30, 17:00~22:00
Closed on Mondays
Credit cards OK (Dinner only)

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Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat

Please check the new postings at:
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Fruit Cocktails by Wataru Matsumoto 10: Organic Tomatoes Bloody Mary

Service: very professional and friendly.
Facilities: great washroom, great cleanliness overall.
Prices: reasonable, good value.
Strong points: Fruit cocktails. Cozy and a comfortable, for ladies and gentlemen alike.

Wataru Matsumoto in action (in the dark!)!

This is the tenth recipe of a (hopefully long) series of cocktails concocted by Wataru Matsumoto, owner/bartender at BOTANICAL (Comfort bar) in Shizuoka City.
No worries about copyrights as Mr. Matsumoto is only too happy to share his secrets!

Bio Farm Matsuki Organic Tomatoes bought at Parco, Shizuoka City!

Now today’s recipe has more than one twist!
1) Real tomatoes are used instead of tomato juice!
2) The tomatoes are organic!
3) The tomatoes are local as they are grown at Bio Farm Matsuki in Shibakawa, Fujinomita City, at the foot of Mount Fuji!

INGREDIENTS:

-Plum tomatoes: medium-small x 6~8, medium-large x 3
-Vodka (Smirnoff in this case): 1 measure
-Rock salt a little

Keep it simple so as to preserve the real taste of the tomatoes!

RECIPE:

-“Grate” the juice out the tomatoes. Wataru uses a ceramic grater. Do not use a mixer or blender. You will lose to many nutriendt and end up with a “soup”!

-Wataru uses two tumblers of different sizes to shake the whole. In the smaller tumbler pour the tomato juice over a minimum of ice. Add salt and vodka. “Cap” the smaller tumbler with the larger one and shake only lightly.

-Pour through strainer into semi-long glass over a couple of glass cubes and serve as it is.
Simple is best!

Makes for a great aperitif in summer!
Ladies will love it!

BOTANICAL (Comfort Bar)
420-0082 Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Ryogae-cho, 1-6-13, Shade Bldg, 1F
Tel.: 054-221-8686
Opening hours: 17:00~01:00
Closed on Mondays.
Credit Cards OK

BIO FARM MATSUKI
〒419-0303 Shizuoka Prefecture, Fujinomiya City, Ooshikakubo, 1158-36
TEL 0544-66-0353
FAX 0544-67-0098
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES:
-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery
-Drink Lovers of The World:
5 Star Foodie Culinary Adventures; Warren Bobrow; Tokyo Terrace; Chez What?
Pran Gravy Kadai Curry; My Kitchen Treasures; Indulge Inspire Imbibe; Simple Math Bakery; Cheap Ethnic Eatz; Taste With The Eyes; Jacob’s Kitchen; The Pink Apron; Kopiatse…To Greek Hospitality; Zomppa; The Baking Barrister; The Witchy Kitchen; What’s Cooking Italian Style Cuisine; Nirmala’s Cooking Corner; Ancient Fire Wines; The Ardent Epicure

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Shizuoka Sake
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Shizuoka Gourmet

Indecent Tomato?

I’m bound to be for a lot of flak from Bazooka Gourmet with this one! LOL
Rainy Sunday today, and the Missus before going to work asked me to prepare some ratatouille for dinner.
I still needed quite a few ingredients vefore starting cooking and went to the neighbourhood supermarket.

I noticed some locally grown organic tomatoes sold in a small bunches.

They looked and felt pretty ripe (BG, keep quiet!), just perfect for the ratatouille.

When I opened the vynil bag they were wrapped in at home I discovered two “siamese twins” in a very peculiar arrangement.
I just couldn’t help taking pics before “separating” them for cooking!
I don’t really know how to call them; indecent? Sensuous? Pervert?…

I’m sur BG will come with something!

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Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Chrisoscope

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

Vegan Caprese-Style Tomato & Tofu Salad

I’ve already introduced vegan tofu salads for my friends.
This is another one with a lttle twist!

INGREDIENTS: For 1~2 persons

-Tofu (kinu tofu): 1/2 block: 200g
-Tomato: a large whole one
-Basil leaves: 10 (large and fresh!)

Dressing:
-Wine vinegar: 1/4 cup: 50 cc/ml
-Salt: 1/3 teaspoon
-Whole black peppers: 3 seeds, ground (use a bottle!)
-Garlic: 1/2 clove (fresh!)
-Red chili pepper: 1/2 (fresh if possible) (Chopped finely)
-Olive oil (EV): 1.1/4~ tablespoon
-Onion: 15 g (Fresh and new if possible!)

RECIPE:

-Cut the tofu in 1 cm-thick slices.

-Cut out the stem end off the tomato and cut into half-moon slices.

-Crush the garlic and throw it into a small pan with the wine vinegar, Salt, black pepper, and red chili pepper and heat it until reduced to half.

-Transfer the dressing into a bowl floating on a larger bowl half-filled with water and ice and leave until chilled.

-Take out unsightly pieces out of the dressing. Grate the onion over it and mix. Add the oil oil and mix.

-On a serving dish place the slices of tofu and tomatoes and the basil leaves alternatively as shown on picture above. Season with dressing and serve!

-Very low in calories!

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Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless Mama, Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice, The French Market Maven

Please check the new postings at:
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French Dessert: Green Tomatoes and Vanilla Tart

Ever thought of using green tomatoes as dessert?
Especially small ones can come as a surprise!

Here is a simple recipe which will please all, adults and kids alike!

Tarte aux Tomates Vertes Vanillees/Green Tomatoes & Vanilla Tart!


INGREDIENTS:
For 6 people

-Pate Brisee/Shortcrust Pastry (sweet/sugared) : Check this easy recipe if you want to make it yourself (In French) 400 g
-Small green tomatoes: 700 g (cut in halves)
-Lemon juice of 2 lemons
-Sugar: 150 g
-Vanilla pods: 2
-Cornstarch: 2 tablespoons
-Butter: 40 g
-Egg white: 1


RECIPE:

-Line the mold with the shortcrust pastry and pre-cook it for 15 minutes in oven at 220 degrees Celsius.
Take the mold out the oven and immediately brush the pastry with egg white to prevent the pastry from drying up.
Put aside.

-Cut the two vanilla pods lengthwise and take out the “heart” and seeds. Mix them delicately with lemon juice.

-In a large frying pan, melt 20 g of butter and fry the tomatoes on a medium fire for 2~3 minutes, taking care not to shake them around too much and damage them. while the tomatoes are cooking, add sugar and cornstarch to the vanilla and lemon juice mix. Mix them in and pour over the tomatoes. Keep frying until the whole becomes translucent. Finally add 20 g of butter and mix quickly.

-Place the tomatoes over the pre-cooked shortcrust pastry and bake in oven at 200 degrees Celsius for 15 minutes.

-Serve with a rose wine.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Social Culinaire, Sushi Nomads, Cook, Eat & Share, Gourmet Fury, 5 Star Foodie

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Vegan Japanese Cuisine: Tomatoes marinated in Sweet Vinegar

Like the Aubergines/Eggplants, Tomatoes are available all year round!

Here is a very simple and healthy recipe that anyone can use and eat at will!

Tomato No Amazu tsuke/Tomeatoes marinated in sweet vinegar!

INGREDIENTS:

-Tomato: 250 g
-Onuon: 15 g (finealy chopped)
-Celery: 10 g (finely chopped)
-Coriander: to taste (fresh and finely chopped

Marinade:
-Sugar: 2,1/2 tablespoons
-Rice vinegar: 50 ml/cc
-Water: 100 ml/cc

RECIPE:

-Pour allthe marinade ingredients in a saucepan and heat until just before boiling point. Switch off fire, let cool completely and chill.
Chill chopped onion, celery and coriander inside the fridge.

-Plunge the tomatoes in hot water, then ice-cold water and peel.
Cut into small enough pieces and add them to the marinade. Chill inside fridge.

-Serve tomatoes with chopped vegetables on topas shown in above picture.

You may add optional chopped vegetables and leaves.
As for salt ot spices I would experiment very carefully!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless Mama, Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice, The French Market Maven

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Vegan Japanese Cuisine: Taro & Tomato Stew

Benn rummaging through my notes and discovered another simple and hearty recipe for my vegan and vegetarian friends!

Taro & Tomato Stew!

INGREDIENTS: For 2 people

-Taro/Sato Imo: 4
-Carrot: 1
-Onion: 1
-Garlic: 1 clove
-Tomato: 100~200 g (canned with their water, or fresh, peeled and seeded)
-Cabbage: 3 leaves
-Miso: 2 tablespoons
-Water: 1/2 cup/100 cc/ml
-Mirin/sweet sake: a little for taste and seasoning

RECIPE:

1-Peel taro and cut into big pieces. Cut carrot into large pieces. Cut onion into 4 quarters. Cut the garlic into thin slices. Cut the cabbage into rough pieces.

2-In a pan drop the taro, carrot, onion and garlic with the tomato and switch on fire. Bring to boil and then lower fire. Cover with lid and cook until vegetables are soft.

3-If you have a pressure cooker, pour everything into it, heat and cook on a low fire for 5 minutes.

4-Add cabbage, miso, mirin and water and cook for a while until cabbage has become soft. Rectify/season with a little salt if necessary although miso contains enough salt.

NOTES:

-Any miso can be used according to your preferences.
-I personally add some lemon juice.
-When servin in bowls, I top it with chopped thin leeks. Fresh coriander would be great, too.

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless MamaFrank Fariello, , Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice

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Easy Vegan Tomato Appetizer

TOMATO-KANTEN

Just found the idea in a Japanese cookbook for an easy vegan/vegetarian appetizer based on tomato:
Agar agar Tomato Jelly!

INGREDIENTS:
-Tomato Juice: 300 ml (make your own juice form tomatoes freshly bought or picked!9
-Orange Juice: 250 ml (same a for tomato juice. Choose biologically grown ones!)
-Sugar: 3 large tablespoons
-Agar agar powder: 4 g

RECIPE:
-Pour all ingredients into pan. Het until suagr and agar and agra are completely dissolved.
-Pour into recipients o your choice and let cool.
-Put inside the fridge and serve when the jelly has completely solidified.

NOTES:
This is a very basic recipe, which calls for variations and ideas:
-If on a diet, discard sugar, and add a lttle celery salt, white pepper and spices of your choice. ecorate with basil leaves.
-Can be used as solid base under fruit or vegetable salads!
-Mixing alcohol with it, vodka for example, and you have jelly cocktail.

Have some good fun!

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Tomatoes: Local varieties in Shizuoka

AGRI-TOMATO1

I had my good friend Rich in mind when I set off on my bicycle yesterday morning in the direction of the Abe River in Shizuoka City. This major river is dotted almost all the way up to its source with farmland. Very often, while the men are busy with staple crops like rice,tubers and even peanuts, some housewives grow vegetables and other produce as a “side business” to contribute some cash to their homesteads.
About an hour ride from my place one will find a JA (Japan Agriculture) market called “Agri Road Miwa” associated with 13 such housewives who sell their vegetables, fruit, flowers, tea, honey and home-made cakes on a daily basis, guaranteeing fresh produce everyday.
The only problem is that you must be there when the market opens at 9:30 and fight off the local “o-baasan/grannies”! LOL
Being seasonal produce only, you can expect something new every morning!
I had already picked some great burdock roots, pink potatoes and maountain veggies, when my eyes stopped on some unusual tomatoes.
Interestingly enough. the grannies were more interested in the lettuce and strawberries, so I had enough time to choose the best specimens!

AGRI-TOMATO2

“Black Tomato”. Actually it is a very deep red colour, practically dark blue-violet.

AGRI-TOMATO3

“Orange Tiger”. Beautiful name, isn’t it?

AGRI-TOMATO4

“Green Tiger”. A cousin of the above!

AGRI-TOMATO5

“White Tomato”. Actually more of a mild beige colour.

Bear in mind that all these tomatoes, in spite of their colour, were ripe.
I bought enough for myself and Yasaitei, a favourite local Japanese Izakaya which specializes in vegetables (I just give them away as the prices are simple ridiculous. If Yasaitei can promote these farmers’ products, I’m more than happy!).
Some actually did not reach my office intact (a long rough bicycle ride is not a great idea for shopping!). I just “sampled” them,… I ended up eating all the “damaged” tomatoes! They were sweet and tangy at the same time, firm and juicy, all basically of the same taste. No need for drinking water after that!
I stored the intact tomatoes in the fridge and later brought them to Yasatei. This izakaya is run by ladies only, and it was a discovery for them! No need to say that the tomatoes were immediately displayed for the customers’ pleasure!

Agri Road Miwa
Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Abeguchi Shinden, 537-1
TEL:054-296-7878
Business hours: 09:30~15:30 (from 08:30 on Saturdays)
Homepage (Japanese)
Even if you don’t understand Japanese look at their products!

Yasaitei
Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Tokiwa-Cho, 1-6-2 Green Heights Wamon 1-C
Tel.: 054-2543277
Business hours: 17:30~22:00
Closed on Sundays
Reservations highly recommended

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Quick Snack: Cream Cheese Tomato Rolls for the Beer!

tomatospringroll

There are times, be it in Winter, Spring, Summer or Autumn, when you just don’t have the will to venture into another cooking expedition, but still want to offer and eat quick, simple and yummy food!

Here is suggestion that you can store inside the fridge just in case hungry friends barge in with some beer (or mineral water! LOL). It can be easily adapted for vegetarians!:

I don’t have to bother with quantities really.
Just know that you need an equal amount (in volume) of Philadelphia (for example) cream cheese and fresh cream lightly beaten to a semi-hard consistency.
In a bowl mix the cheese and cream well. Add a little salt, pepper, nutmeg and whatever spice you fancy. Add some finely chopped herbs!
As for the tomatoes, choose them as large as possible, but not too ripe to avoid them breaking away. Peel them first, by making a light cut near the stem and plunging them in hot water (or holding them over a flame). When the skin starts opening, take them out and plunge them in cold water. They should peel off very easily.
Cut them in half, empty them, “spread” (you might have to help with a few small cuts) them on a kitchen paper to sponge water off.

Note: do not salt the tomatoes, or they’ll give out gallons of water!

On a large enough piece of cellophane paper spread the tomato flesh, fill with an adequate amount of cream cheese mix, and make a roll closing the cellophane paper around. Twist the ends shut.
Leave in refrigearator until served.

Simple presentation suggestion (look at pic!):
A three-piece presentation is easiest with cut sweet pimento and boiled broccoly stems (a good way to use them!).
Cut the tomato rolls half-way at a slant for better effect.
Add lightly boiled turnips, pieces of raw ham, and plenty of greens.
Serve with a pot of vinaigrette or dip sauce.

Simple and appetizing!
Good for hungry kids, too!

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