Tag Archives: Aubergine

Vegan Japanese Dessert: “Daigaku Imo” Sweet Potato

Sweet potatoes or Satsuma Imo/薩摩芋 were introduced a long time ago in Japan where they became a mainstay vegetable in winter, especially in the west of Japan where they supplemented rice as a staple food.
Daigaku Imo/大学芋, literally ‘University Potatoes” have been popular with students for times immemorial as not only as a dessert but also as a great snack. In fact, a lot of people prefer them to fried potatoes!

INGREDIENTS: (for 4 people)

Sweet potato (raw): 600 g
Sugar: 90 g
Ground white sesame seeds: 1 teaspoon
Oil: As appropriate

RECIPE:

Peel sweet potatoes.
Cut in long thin slices (thin wedges). Actually cut them into the shape and size of your preference but take in account that the thicker they are, the longer time they will take to fry.
Leave in water for 10 minutes.
Take out of water.
Wipe off all humidity.

Heat oil to 150 degrees. Keep oil shallow enough.
Fry until the sweet potatoes have softened. Do not let them change color then.

Take sweet potatoes out and shake oil off.
Bring the oil to 180 degrees.
Fry the sweet potatoes again until they attain a nice brown color.

While the sweet potatoes are frying pour the water and sugar in a separate pan and heat on a low fire.
Let sugar dissolve completely.
When the rim of the water changes color keep heating gently shaking the pan around. You may use a spatula but proceed gently.
When the syrup has attained a light brown color switch off fire.

Take sweet potatoes out of the oil once cooked. Shake off oil well. Drop the potatoes into a separate bowl.
Add the ground white sesame seeds.
Mix well, taking care not to damage the potatoes.

Coat the potatoes with syrup while hot and let cool down completely inside a recipient slightly coated with oil.

Serve and enjoy!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

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Vegan Japanese recipe: Fried and Marinated Eggplants with Paprika

Vegan cuisine can be a very easy concept making the best out of simple and tasty ingredients!
here is another simple way to accomodate eggplants the Japanese way!

INGREDIENTS: (for 2~3 people)

Eggplants: 3^4
White wine vinegar (or Japanese rice vinegar): 1 tablespoon
Paprika powder: as much as you want!
Salt: 1/2 teaspoon

RECIPE:

Clean the eggplants. Wipe them and cut them into one bite pieces.

In a pan pour olive oil. Heat the pan over a low fire.
Throw in all the eggplants.
Fry until heat has penetrated the eggplants well. Add teh vinegar.
Cover with a lid and cook over medium fire until the greater part of water/sauce has disappeared.

Transfer into a recipient Let cool down. Keep inside therefrigerator.
Serve chilled sprinkled with plenty of paprika powder!
Naturally you can add color and taste served topped with fresh herbs!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Vegan Japanese Recipe: Japanese-style Cold Eggplants & Tomato Antipasti

Japanese and Italian influences can be found in this simple antipasti recip!

Japanese-style Cold Eggplants & Tomato Antipasti

INGREDIENTS: (for 3 people)

Eggplants: 3 (400 g)
Tomato: 1 large
Small leek: 1 finely chopped
Ooba or large shiso/perilla : 4 leaves finly cut

For the dressing:
Ground white sesame seeds: 1 very large tablespoon/30 g
Sesame oil: 1 and a half tablespoons
Soy sauce: 3 tablespoons
Sugar: 1 tablespoon
Japanese sake (if not available dry white wine):
Finely chopped fresh ginger: 1 teaspoon
Grated fresh garlic: a ;ittle or as appropriate
Red chili pepper: 1/2, finely chopped

RECIPE:

Cut eggplants in half. Then cut off part of the skin 8to make them easier to eat. Cut each half lengthwise in atrips 5~8 mm thick.

Wet the the eggplants in water. Put them inside a cooking cellphane/vinyl pouch. Fold the pouch so as to have the opening ath bottom. You could also wrap them in cellophane paper.
Cook in microwave oven at 600 W for 1 minute and 30 seconds.
You could also cook them inside a steamer.

Let cool down completely and then chill them inside refrigerator.
If you want to chill them quickly bind the pouch closed and dip it in a bowl full of water and ice.

Put all the sauce ingredients into a bowl. Cover it with cellophane paper and cook in microwave oven for 50 seconds. Let it cool completely and then chill it.

Serving for one person.

Arrange the eggplants on serving dish. Put the tomato thinly sliced and formed into a rose on top.
decorate the eggplants and tomato with chopped leek and thinly sliced shiso.
Pour sauce over the whole as shown in top picyure.

Serve and enjoy with a great beer, cold sake or chilled white wine!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Vegan Japanese Recipe: Japanese-style Sweet & Sour Eggplants

Eggplants or Aubergines or Nasu/茄子 in Japanese are a very popular vegetable in Japan whose people have many recipes of their own that would satisfy many vegans and vegetarians worldwide.
These recipes are simple and the ingredients should be easy to obtain!
Sweet & sour sauces basically originate from China but Japan has its own versions, albeit lighter in texture and taste!

Japanese-style Sweet & Sour Eggplants

INGREDIENTS: (for 2 people)

Eggplants: 2~3
Freshly grated ginger: 1 tablespoon
Green shiso/perilla: 5 leaves
Soy sauce: 2 tablespoons
Sugar: 1 and a half tablespoons
Salad oil: 1 large tablespoon and a little
Golden sesame seeds: as appropriate

RECIPE:

Take off stem part and cut eggplants lengthwise in four. Clean under running cold water. Wipe off all water with kitchen paper.

In a skillet pour the oil and fry the eggplants until they have attained a nice color.

In a large bowl drop the soy sauce, grated ginger and sugar. Mix well. Add the shiso leaves finely cut in thin strips. mix quickly.

Add the fried eggplants in the bowl. Stir them gently as to cover them completely. Let soak them in for at least 5 minutes. The fact that the eggplants are hot will melt the sugar and help them absorb the sauce.

Place the eggplants in a dish. Pour all the sauce on top and sprinkle sesame seeds on top.
The Japanese eat such a dish in summer at room temperature.
Great snack with beer!

Here is a variation with the same ingredients with mini tomatoes and shishito hot chilies added for more color and presentation. And taste, of course!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in kanzai by Nevitt Reagan!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Japanese Gastronomy: Vegan Japanese Simmered Egg Plant

Egg plants or aubergines, originating from India, are very popular in Japan and chefs have come up with many simple and succulent recipes in this country!

Here is a very simple one to satisfy the priorities of a vegan or vegetarian.
It makes for a great snack with your drink!

Japanese Simmered Egg plant/Nasi no Ni Komi/茄子乃煮込み

INGREDIENTS For 3 egg plants

Egg plants: 3 shortish and round
Soy sauce: 2 tablespoons
Sugar: 3 tablespoons
Dry short chili (鷹の爪): 1
Sesame oil: as appropriate

RECIPE

1)
Take/cut off the sepals and puncture the egg plant with a tooth pick in dozen places.

2)
In a wok or saucepan drop the egg plants and add soy sauce, sugar and chili. Switch the fire on to hot.
Rool the eggplant in the juices regularly.

3)
Once the liquid has reduced to half, turn the fire down to medium.

4)
Once the liquid has been absorbed by the eggplant add the sesame oil and roll the eggplants in them.
Switch off fire and serve!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India
Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London
Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Tomato & Eggplants Stew

Aubergines or eggplants/eggplants and tomatoes are the vegetables of the summer!
They come in cheap, are aplenty and very healthy.
The French have “invented” ratatouille to accomodate them together.
This recipe is a cross between the French and Italian concept.
Vegans should forget the bacon and adopt this simple recipe!

Tomato & Eggplants Stew!

INGREDIENTS: For 4 people

-Eggplants: 4
-Tomatoes: 2
-Bacon: 60g
-Garlic: 1 clove
-Parsley/finely chopped: 1 tablespoon
-Flour: as appropriate
-Olive oil (EV): as appropriate
-Salt & pepper
-Frying oil

RECIPE:

-Peel the eggplants partly along their length in 4~5 spots for design. Cut lengthwise in 4 and cut across to obtain 2 cm thick pieces.

-Cut the tomatoes in 2 cm side cubes.

-Cut bacon in 8 mm wide strips/pieces.

-Cut the garlic clove in two halves and take out core (indegistble!). Cruch the garlic.

-Coat the cut eggplants with flour. Shake off excess flour before deep-frying them at high temperature (170~180 degrees Celsius). Once fried, lay on kitchen paper to take off excess oil, then transfer into bowl. Sprinkle them with a little salt.

-Pour some olive oil in a frypan. Heat it and fry bacon in it. When the bacon becomes crispy, add the tomato cubes and garlic. Fry until most water/liquid is gone. Season with salt and pepper.

-Throw in the eggplants and check taste and add salt and pepper if necessary. Add chopped parsley and a little more olive oil before serving.

Very easy and adaptable, isn’t it?

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow, Bread + Butter, Zoy Zhang, Hungry Neko, Think Twice, Frank Fariello, Mangantayon, Hapabento, Elinluv Tidbit Corner, Tokyo Terrace, Maison de Christina, Chrys Niles,Lexi, Culinary Musings, Wheeling Gourmet, Comestiblog, Chronicles Of A Curious Cook, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Palate To Pen, Yellin Yakimono Gallery, Tokyo Terrace, Hilah Cooking, More than a Mount Full, Arkonite Bento, Happy Little Bento; 5 Star Foodie; Jefferson’s Table; Oyster Culture; Gourmet Fury; Island Vittles; Good Beer & Country Boys; Rubber Slippers In Italy; Color Food daidokoro/Osaka;/a; The Witchy Kitchen; Citron Et Vanille, Lunsj Med Buffet/Estonian Gastronomy (English), Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Chrisoscope

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

Vegetarian Japanese Cuisine: Egg Plant/Aubergine & Yoghurt Paste

Aubergines or egg plants were introduced from India to Jpan a very long time ago.
The Japanese since then have adopted them in their gastronomy and lore. Interetingly enough, it has become the symbol of both male virility and utter stupidity! (In Frnce they are a surname given to lady traffic wardens!).

Aubergines are a very versatile vegetable which can be easily cooked/prepared into vegetarian cuisine.
Here is a simple recipe reminiscent ofTurkish gastronomy to enjoy as a snack on freshly toasted bread!

Egg Plant/Aubergine & Yoghurt Paste!

INGREDIENTS: For 2 people

-Egg plants/aubergines: 4 (organic if possible!)
-Garlic: 1 clove (grated)
-Yoghurt: 2~3 cups/400~600 cc/ml
-Olive oIl (EVA): 2 tablespoons
-Salt: 1/2 teaspoon
-Lemon juice: To taste

Optional: spices to taste

RECIPE:

-Grill the egg plants/aubergines directly over the flame on a grill.
Doing it in the oven is fine, too.

-Once the the egg plants/aubergines have been evenly grilled and become soft inside, peel them completely.

-Mash them finely with a knife.
Do not use a food processor as the the egg plants/aubergines will become a messy juice!

-Pour the mashed egg plants/aubergines in a large bowl. Add grated garlic, olive oil and yoghurt.
Mix well.
Season with lemon juice, salt and spices (optional). Check taste and rectify if needed.
The taste might a bit bland to some, so season it to your preferences.
You may add some parmegiano cheese for example.

In Turkey they don’t always include garlic. Actually recipes vary greatly in that country.
The Japanese will sometimes add sesame oil.
Nuts paste or ground sesame seeds are also a great alternative!

Enjoy it on your favourite toasted bread!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES
Not-Just-Recipes, Bengal cuisine, Cooking Vegetarian, Frank Fariello, Gluten-free Vegan Family, Meatless Mama, Warren Bobrow, Wheeling Gourmet, Le Petit Cuisinier, Vegan Epicurean, Miss V’s Vegan Cookbook, Comestiblog, To Cheese or not To Cheese, The Lacquer Spoon, Russell 3, Octopuspie, Bread + Butter, Pegasus Legend, Think Twice, The French Market Maven

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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