Izakaya: Dinner at Uzu In Shizuoka City! (Winter 2012)

Kan sawara/寒鰆/Winter Spanish Mackerel Sashimi!

Service: Excellent and very friendly. Very Japanese atmosphere.
Facilities: Excellent washroom facilities. Great cleanliness overall
Prices: reasonable.
Strong Points: Great sake from Shizuoka and Japan Great Shochu. Home-made umeshu. Mainly local products, especially organic vegetables.

Izakaya are the best places to visit in Japan if you wish to know and taste local food and products.
Naturally they come at different prices and levels, but here in Shizuoka it is a true embarrassment of choices!
We are lucky to have recently moved near arguably the best izakaya in Shizuoka Prefecture, Uzu, so it is only a question of visiting it regularly for a dinner of Shizuoka (and elsewhere) specialties!

It is located away from the busy center of town and not easy to find, although really famous!
The day’s specialties are always announced in calligraphy outside!

Some of the great sakes waiting for you inside!

Uzu!

A beautiful noren/暖簾/entrance curtain!

The snack coming with the first drink!
For once we sat at the counter in front of the kitchen!

While the Missus had her wine I ordered a 5-sake sampling set! You can choose your sakes when ordering such a set!

Most of the earthenware used for serving are locally made!

likewise for individual plates and bowls!

The sashimi is always superlative in Uzu.
So what did we order?

Kan sawara/寒鰆/Winter Spanish Mackerel Sashimi!
This is a difficult fish to find in Shizuoka Prefecture and Uzu serves one a year. We were surely lucky!

For a closer look!
It was served slightly seared for more savors!

Rainbow Trout from Kunugi Rainbow Trout Farm in Fujinomiya City!

For a closer look!
So tender and served with grated wasabi from Umegashima, up the Abe River in Shizuoka City!

After the sashimi it was time to sample some meat!
Mangenton pork cutlets with plenty of chopped leeks!

The pork from Sanoman Co in Fujinomiya City is served as deep-fried cutlets!
I know a lot of friends abroad who would jump in the sea for that!

Uzu always serves extraordinary local organic vegetables: Giant burdock (oura gobo) roots chips salad!

This burdock comes from Matsuki Bio Farm in Fujinomiya City!

We followed this with a vegetable of the sea: Mozuku/水雲、海蘊 、藻付、海雲/an edible weed that comes by the name of Cladosiphon okamuranus

A very thick variety from Okinawa!!

We were still a bit hungry and opted to order the Giant Hokke!
Hokke/法華 goes by the unusual name of Arabesque Greenling and comes from Hokkaido! Ours was a truly enormous sample!

Grilled to perfection, it is savored with grated daikon, soy asuce and lime!
It certainly needed the two of us to finish it!

To be continued…

UZU
Shizuoka City, Otowa-cho, 3-18
Tel.: 054-249-6262
Business hours: 17:00=23:00
Closed on Mondays and first Tuesday
Reservations recommended
Credit cards OK
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Cruise finds Fukushima pollution: Good News-Sea radiation levels near Fukushima are not harmful, by Jonathan Amos of the BBC!

Just found this article written by Jonathan Amos for the BBC

Marine organisms were collected for evaluation

Radioactive elements from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant have been detected in seawater and marine organisms up to 600km from Japan.

But the scientists who made the discovery stress the natural radioactivity of seawater dwarfs anything seen in their samples.

The results come from a research cruise in June last year led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

The initial findings were presented to the biennial Ocean Sciences Meeting.

“Just because we can measure radioactivity doesn’t mean it’s harmful,” WHOI’s Ken Buesseler told the gathering in Salt Lake City.

“There’s a pretty good news story in here – that the levels [of radioactivity] offshore are not of significance to human health in terms of exposure, or even if you were to eat the seafood offshore,” he added.

CONTINUE HERE>>>

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Weird Japan (11): Acid Milk!

A few years ago we used to see those big ads in Japan for “Homo Milk” standing for “Homogeneous Milk”. That is, until someone pointed out this might mislead some people into the wrong conclusions…

I found this truck in front of a kindergarten this morning on the way to my classroom.
After some investigation I found out (with the help of my Japanese student), that yoghurt is also called fermented milk in Japanese!
Acid Milk simply stands for Yoghurt!
Even so, it might be a good idea (but I suppose it is too late!) to think of a change of name, unless some people (again!) think of an even worse possibility! LOL

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Weird japan (10): Airy Blossom?

Found this today in Cenova Department Store in Shizuoka!

The Japanese reads:
“Like a flower, let’s change our clothes to light Spring garments”

Any comments?

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Japanese Antiques for your Dining Room: Tansu/Japanese Chests

Japan is still a very good country to prospect for antiques in spite of its devouring modernity.
When it comes to antique or even more homey tansu/箪笥, one should keep both eyes open as these Japanese-style chests can become extremely useful in any home because of their practical shapes and sturdy material, not to mention their aesthetic qualities.
Even if you are here for a short stay or plan to leave soon, they can easily be filled with your belongings actually helping with the ever tiring chore of removal.

Fine, Sir, but what is a tansu?Sorry, my good friend, I ought to have explained that a bit earlier!
Tansu is the word for chest, chest of drawers or cupboard, all in one word in Japanese. It is often used in the West, notably in the antique business, to refer to traditional Japanese chests, handcrafted and made of fine wood. The latter is important when it comes to pricing. Most popular woods are Hinoki/檜 or Japanese cypress, Keyaki/欅 or Japanese elm, Kuri/栗 or Chestnut,, Sugi/杉 and Kiri/桐 or Paulownia.
After all, it is a very vague term to describe a whole range of chests, but many collectors focus on finding antique Tansu. There are many workshops (especially in Shizuoka or other prefectures with a good supply of wood) in imitation of the classic antiques. Some are made of excellent reclaimed wood causing the new Tansu to retain a more aged look that some people seek. Make sure to ask first if the antique tansu is authentic or an imitation.
But my bet, that is if you have the time, is to look around in farms and in the country where there are not only authentic, but cheap and serviceable. Moreover, people tend to be happy to get rid of them!

Now, before you go prospecting, it always a good idea to acquire a little basic knowledge. One way to conduct a successful bargain!

Main types of Tansu:
-Choba-dansu/著場箪笥/Merchant Tansu. Used by merchants, they display elaborate metal hardware and were used in shops to impress customers. They come in many sizes depending on trade plied by their owners: sewing supplies chests, sea chests, merchant chests, futon chests or kitchen equipment chests. They could either open from a single side or be accessible from both sides.
-Kusuri-dansu/薬箪笥 were and still are apothecary/medicine chest. They were used to store herbs, especially at medicinal herbs/kanpoyaku/漢方薬 traditional pharmacists. They are often made of paulownia wood and have many small drawers. They make for the perfect chest for jewels, spectacles or other small collection object storage, or even display.
-Kaidan-dansu/階段箪笥, or step-chests are another very popular collection item, although their initial purpose was of a totally different nature. They were actually used to avoid taxation on other areas of a home when taxes were levied based on the size of one’s home! When the tax collectors appeared on the horizon, home-dwellers quickly moved those chests under the stairs away from their eyes! When small, they make for great display chests at homes and shops. When big, their aesthetical and practical qualities can be combined to save space.
-Katana-dansu/刀箪笥. These were used to store swords.They are long and low and often made of palownia to keep sword from rusting.
-Mizuya-dansu/水や箪笥 or Daidokoro-dana/台所棚 used in kitchens for the storage of plates, utensils and food items. They usually include many sliding doors and drawers of full plain wood, or adjourned wood, the latter coming with mesh or bars.

-Sendai-dansu/仙台箪笥. These are used to store kimomo and clothing. Originally made from the Sendai region, they are often made of zelkova wood with drawers lined in cedar. They usually come as one long top drawer with three slightly smaller drawers underneath. Some are true antiques as they were commissioned from former sword makers after the Samurai were disbanded in the Meiji era.
-Cha-dansu/茶箪笥. They were used to store tea ceremony implements. This is one type of antique chest that can still be found in homes or in the country!
-Funa-dansu/船箪笥. They were ship chests, used a scontainers from the Edo period to the Meiji Era. They came in three basic designs:
Kakesuzuri/かけすずり, a small chest with a single swinging door and multiple internal drawers inside.
Hangai/半外, a small chest for clothing storage.
Cho-Bako/庁箱, or account box.. This last comes in many more types, a pleasure for collectors!

Many regions of Japan made tansu. Check where the former castle towns on the posts roads stood and you will have a good chance to make a discovery. Look for the ironware and quizz their owners! Wood and lacqyuer types are also clue to the origin of some pieces.
The elements of antique tansu hardware were created from forged iron, and sometimes with copper. Search for design elements engraved or inlaid. Incidentally, black finish on the iron was created by applying rapeseed oil to the hot metal.

Recommended Books:
Traditional Japanese Furniture by Kazuko Koizumi
Japanese Cabinetry/The Art & Craft Of Tansu by David Jackson & Dane Owen

Recommended website:
Jtansu at: http://www.jtansu.com/Japanese-Tansu-s/1.htm
David Jackson: Tansu Restoration & Conservation at: http://www.tansuconservation.com/

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Eel Restaurant “Atsumi” in Hamamatsu City!

Shiroyaki Unagi

Service: traditional and friendly
Facilities: old-fashioned but clean
Prices: Slightly expensive (“real” eels are expensive anywhere in Japan!)
Strong points: True traditional Japanese eel restaurant.

Hamamatsu City is famous all over Japan for some of its large companies (Yamaha, Kawai, etc) but it also known all over the country for one of its gastronomic specialties, eel, or unagi/鰻!
Eels have been a favorite food in that City for untold ages to the point that they have developed different competing “schools” as pertains to its preparation!

One of the most celebrated restaurants is Atsumi in Naka Ku, the downtown area.
Even in freezing weather customers form a queue a long time before they open for lunch!

It was first opened in 1907!
The English and Japanese noren/entrance curtain proves it is also popular with expats!

Be it downstairs or upstairs, it looks venerable indeed!

Only the signs are modern!

Very traditional surroundings. Old fashioned but clean, the more for it that the establishment is entirely non-smoking!

These critters will end up in our plates and bowls!

The Missus ordered “Kabayaki/蒲焼 style” set. The eels are dipped into “tare/sauce” while being grilled over charcoal.
The tare makes the difference, and it is a good indication of the proficiency of the chef!

The Missus ordered it with some tare on the rice, too.

I ordered the “shiroyaki/白焼き lunch set”.
Shiro stands for white, and yaki for grilled.
Shiroyaki means that no tare was applied on the eel while being grilled.

But I ordered it on top of rice seasoned with tare for perfect balance!

The great thing about shiroyaki style is that you can season each piece of eel with grated garlic, ginger, onion or wasabi before savoring it!

The liver/kimo” of the same fish is served in a clear and delicious soup!

And they always serve a Shizuoka fruit for dessert!
In this case muskmelon!

Eel Restaurant ATSUMI
430-0934 Hamamamtsu Shi, Naka Ku, Chitose Machi, 70
Opening hours: 11:30~13:40, 17:15~19:30 (could close earlier if run out of eels!)
Closed on Wednesdays (with two more holidays either on Tusdays or Thursdays. Reserve beforehand anyway!)
Reservations highly recommended
Credit Cards OK
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)
Entirely non-smoking!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Sansai/Edible Wild Japanese Mountain Vegetables (2012 edition)

tomii-veg31

“Sansai/Wild Mountain Plants” are around the corner so I thought it might be a good idea to draw people’s attention back to them for easier reference! They also include wild fruit that can be eaten both as vegetables and fruit with various preparations.
Some can be boiled, others fried, prepared as tempura, cooked in soup, prepared as pickles or jam, etc.

As it would become far too big (already massive, but inexhaustive) a posting if I wrote everything, please pick up one item at a time if you want more explanations and I will write an individual article for your pleasure!
But some have added some since the last time I wrote about them and I added some facts!

Here we go:
(No particular order)

ainu-negi-alium-victorialis
AINU NEGI: ALIUM VICTORIALIS
Also called: GYOUJA NINIKU/VICTORY ONION/ALPINE LEEK

High in Vitamin B1

akebi-chocolate-vine
AKEBI: CHOCOLATE VINE

High in Potassium, Vitamin B1, B2, B6, C and vegetal fibers.
Provide great stamina!

amadokoro-polygonatum-odoratum
AMADOKORO: POLYGONATUM ODORATUM

azami-thistle
AZAMI: THISTLE

fukinoto-giant-butterbur
FUKINOTO: GIANT BUTTERBUR/FLOWER CLUSTER

High in Vitamin A Beta carotene, B1, B2, b6, C, vegetal Fibers and Potassium.

hamaboufuu-glhnia-littoralis
HAMABOUFUU: GLEHNIA LITTORALIS

hangonsou-senecio-cannabifolius
HANGONSOU: SENECIO CANNABIFOLIUS

hasukappu-lonicera-caerulea
HASUKAPPU: LONICERA CAERULEA/HASCUP

hikagehego-flying-spider-monkey-tree-fern
HIKAGEHEGO: FLYING SPIDER MONKEY TREE FERN

irakusa-urtica-thunbergiana
IRAKUSA: URTICA THUNBERGIANA

itadori-japanese-knotweed
ITADORI: JAPANESE KNOTWEED

katakuri-dogtooth-violet
KATAKURI: DOGTOOTH VIOLET

Flowers are also edible.

kiboushi-plantain-lily-hosta-fortinei
KIBOUSHI: PLANTAIN LILY HOSTA FORTINEI ( a variety of Hosta Montana)

kogomi-ostrich-fern
KOGOMI: OSTRICH FERN (exists as green and red)

Great plant as it needs no special procees to erase tanginess.
High Carotenes, Vitamin C, Amino acids and vegetal fibers.

koshiabura-ascathopanax-sciadophylloides
KOSHIABURA : ASCATHOPANAX SCIADOPHYLLOIDES

kuko-chinese-wolfberry
KUKO: CHINESE WOLFBERRY

kusagi-harlequin-glory-bower-peanut-butter-shrub2
KUSAGI: HARLEQUIN GLORY BOWER PEANUT BUTTER SHRUB

matatabi-silver-vine
MATATABI: SILVER VINE

mitsuba-japanese-honeywort
MITSUBA: JAPANESE HONEYWORT

nirinsou-anemone-flaccida
NIRINSOU: ANEMONE FLACCIDA

nobiru-alium-macrostemon
NOBIRU: ALIUM MACROSTEMON

High in Vitamin C, Carotenes, Calcium, Potassium and vegetal fibers.

oyamabokuchi-synurus-pungens
OYAMABOKUCHI: SYNURUS PUNGENS

ryoubu-clrthra-barbinervis
RYOUBU: CLERTHRA BARBINERVIS

sarunashi-actinia-arguta
SARUNASHI: ACTINIA ARGUTA

seri-japanese-parsley
SERI: JAPANESE PARSLEY

suberiyu-common-purslane
SUBERIYU: COMMON PURSLANE

takenoko-bamboo-shoots
TAKENOKO: BAMBOO SHOOTS (SPROUTS)

tanpopo-dandelion
TANPOPO: DANDELION

tara-no-me-aralia-elata
TARA NO ME: ARALIA ELATA

High in Potassium, Vitamin A Beta Carotenes, B2 and vegetal fibers.

tsukushi-horsetail
TSUKUSHI: HORSETAIL

High in Potassium, Magnesium, Carotenes and Vitamin E.

tsuroganeninjin-adenophora-triphylla
TSUROGANENINJIN: ADENOPHORA TRIPHYLLA

udo-aralia-cordata
UDO: ARALIA CORDATA

High in Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, Vitamin B1, C, Pantotene acid.
Helps combat human body acidity.

yamaudo
YAMAUDO: same as UDO (above)

urui-hosta-montana
URUI: HOSTA MONTANA

Can be eaten raw.
Great in salads. Have become a common vegetable in Japan.

warabi-pteridium-aquilinum
WARABI: PTERIDIUM AQUILINUM/BRACKEN

High Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Vitamin B2, C, E and vegetal fibers.

yamabudo-crimson-glory-vine
YAMABUDO: CRIMSON GLORY VINE

yamawasabi-wild-horseradish
YAMAWASABI: WILD HORSERADISH

zenmai-osmunda-japonica
ZENMAI: OSMUNDA JAPONICA/ROYAL FERN

High in Potassium, Vitamin A Beta Carotenes, B2, B6, C and vegetal fibers.


FUKI:JAPANESE BUTTERBUR/GIANT BUTTERBUR

High in Potassium, Calcium, Vitamin B2 and vegetal fibers.

—————————
Still have to find the English names for the following ones!

aiko
AIKO

akamizu
AKAMIZU/ELATOSTEMA UMBELLATUM var. NAJUS

Found the name!

aomizu
AOMIZU

inudouna
INUDOUNA

shidoke
SHIDOKE

ITADORI


HONNA/Also called SUPPON


YOMOGI/MUGWORT

Not to be confused with absinthe!


NOKANZOU


YUKINOSHITA/BEEFSTEAK GERANIUM

Found the name!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

Pierre.Cuisine, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, 47 Japanese Farms Through The Eyes of Its Rural Communities, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento,Adventures in Bento Making, American Bent, Beanbento, Bento No, Bento Wo Tsukurimashou, Cooking Cute, Eula, Hapabento , Happy Bento, Jacki’s Bento Blog, Kitchen Cow, Leggo My Obento, Le Petit Journal Bento & CO (French), Lunch In A Box,
Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, The Herbed Kitchen, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Cooking Cute, Timeless Gourmet, Bento Bug, Ideal Meal, Bentosaurus, Mr. Foodie (London/UK), Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Good Beer & Country Boys, Another Pint, Please!
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery